Maura Murray

General Category => Evidence => Topic started by: MauraMurrayEvidence on November 29, 2019, 02:50:05 pm

Title: Newspaper Articles
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on November 29, 2019, 02:50:05 pm
Status
We actually have 285 articles. Some of the articles span over a number of posts

If you want to view or print out a particular article on its own - you can accomplish this it one of two ways:

1. Go to the Newspaper Index: https://mauramurray.createaforum.com/indexes/printed-media-index-newspapers-transcriptions-other-part-1/
...and click on the link of the particular article

or

2. Click on the name of the post and and make note of the message number in the link.

Example: https://mauramurray.createaforum.com/evidence/newspaper-articles-57/msg389/#msg389 ...change the above link by removing msg389/#msg389 and adding ?message=389 to the end of the link. In this example, the link will end up being changed to: https://mauramurray.createaforum.com/evidence/newspaper-articles-57?message=389 At that point you can print out the particular article. 

Potentially Missing Articles

There are at least 19 Patriot Ledger that I can't find, but I know exist, but can't find, listed below. There are also 4 from the Valley News (White River Junction) that I haven't looked for yet and 1 from Concord Monitor - also listed below. A few potentials from old forum and elsewhere, not all listed below.

Remaining known items not in...I suspect some are duplicates...


Possibly more?
Check Nancy Grace Transcript
Check the three part article, is it in order?...
Title: Newspaper Article #1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 04:27:43 pm
The Caledonian-Record February 12, 2004

Haverhill - Police Ask For Help Finding Missing Woman

Gary E. Lindsley

Haverhill police officials have issued a plea for the public's help in locating a missing 21-year-old Massachusetts woman.

The woman, Maura Murray of Hanson, may be suicidal, according to a press release by Police Chief Jeffrey Williams.

Police began their search after they responded to a one-car accident on Wild Ammonoosuc Road in Woodsville, Monday.

When officers arrived at the scene of the accident, they found an abandoned, black 1996 Saturn bearing Massachusetts plates.

A search of the area for Murray by local police, New Hampshire State Police and emergency medical services personnel came up empty.

Witnesses who saw the accident told police they had seen a lone woman. They also said that it didn't appear that the woman had been injured in the accident.

When asked if she needed help or the police, she reportedly said, "No." She left the scene before police and EMS arrived.

Murray was last seen wearing jeans and a dark colored coat. She is a white female with brown, shoulder-length hair and blue eyes. She is 5 feet, 7 inches tall and weighs about 120 pounds.

Police say an intensive search is under way and is being conducted by the Haverhill Police Department, Troop F and New Hampshire Fish and Game.

A New Hampshire State Police helicopter also is taking part in the search.

Police are asking anyone who may have seen a woman matching Murray's description Monday near the accident scene at about 7 p.m. to contact them.

Additionally, anyone seeing her since the night of the accident should call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.

Police believe Murray may be headed to the Kancamagus Highway area.
Title: Newspaper Article #2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 04:28:27 pm


New Hampshire Union Leader

February 12, 2004

Search under way for missing woman

By Lorna Colquhoun

HAVERHILL -- A search is under way for a Massachusetts woman who has not been seen since a car accident Monday night in a remote area of Woodsville.

Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams said foul play is not suspected, but there is concern about the whereabouts of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass. She is described as "possibly suicidal."

Yesterday, local and state police, including the state police helicopter, as well as Fish and Game conservation officers, searched the area in which Murray was last seen, but had not located her.

Just before 7 p.m. Monday, Haverhill police responded to a report of a single-car accident on the sparsely populated Wild Ammonoosuc Road, where Route 112 follows the Wild Ammonoosuc River.

By the time an officer arrived, Murray's 1996 black Saturn sedan with a Massachusetts registration was abandoned.

Murray is 5-foot-7 and 120 pounds, with shoulder-length brown hair and blue eyes. She was last seen wearing jeans and a dark coat.

Haverhill police are asking anyone who might have seen Murray at any time since about 7 p.m. on Monday to call 787-2222.

Title: Newspaper Articles #3
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 04:57:41 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

February 13, 2004

Family searches northern NH for woman

By Lorna Colquhoun

Haverhill, NH -- A worried family fanned out across northern New Hampshire yesterday in search of a young woman who vanished after a minor car accident Monday night.

Maura Murray, 21, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, has not been seen since her car went off Route 112 Monday in the Wild Ammonoosuc area of Woodsville. Witnesses called police after the accident, but she disappeared before an officer arrived. A search followed that night, but there was no sign of Murray.

On Wednesday, local and state police, including the state police helicopter and Fish and Game conservation officers, searched the remote area of Route 112, but found no sign of her.

“This is very unusual" said Fred Murray, her father. “It's not like her to just take off."

Family members, including her brothers and sister, as well as her boyfriend, Bill Rausch, who flew in from Oklahoma when she was reported missing, fanned out from Haverhill to Lincoln, across the Kancamagus Highway to Conway and Bartlett, putting up flyers along the way, in the hope that someone may have seen her in the days since Monday.

Their search has been concentrated in the White Mountains, since Murray and her family have vacationed in the Lincoln and Conway areas for years.

"We went to every spot we thought she might go to hotels and motels and put up flyers," Bill Rausch said.

But so far, their efforts have come up empty.

The only thing they do have to go on is a call Bill Rausch received on cell phone after he flew back to Massachusetts late Tuesday.

There was just someone breathing on the other end, and the number was unknown, said Bill Rausch, who is planning to ask Murray to marry him. “I tried calling the number back, but it turned out to be a (number for a) phone card."

Police were attempting to track down from where the card may have come, he said.

Haverhill police Chief Jeff Williams said Wednesday that there doesn't appear to be foul play involved. Her family surmises that since there was a lack of footprints near her car, she may have taken a ride with someone.

Fred Murray said he wants to tell his daughter that whatever is troubling her, it's nothing that can't be worked out.

"I don't know what the matter is, or the trouble you think you might be in,he said, but it isn't anything we can't solve. It's me you can tell me. We will work it out until we solve it."

The family hopes that the hundreds of flyers they've put up in the past two days will provide some leads for them to pursue.

"We just want to spread the word around and ask anyone who may have seen her to please call us," Fred Murray said.

Murray is described as being 5-feet, 7 inches tall, 120 pounds, with shoulder length brown hair and blue eyes. She was last seen wearing jeans and a dark jacket.

Anyone with information is asked to call Haverhill police at 787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 4
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 05:00:57 pm
Boston Herald/Nashua Telegraph

February 13, 2004

Mass. woman missing after N.H. car crash

HAVERHILL, N. H. - Police were looking for a Massachusetts woman last seen Monday at a one-car accident. Police said Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., was last seen on Ammonoosuc Road in the Woodsville neighborhood of Haverhill, where she had crashed her car.

They said she appeared uninjured and left before emergency personnel arrived.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 5
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 05:02:56 pm
The Caledonian-Record

February 13, 2004

Family Members, Fiance Seek Help In Finding Woman

By Gary E. Lindsley

Fred Murray has issued a plea to his 21-year-old daughter to contact him so they can work together on straightening out what is troubling her.

Murray met with reporters in Bethlehem Thursday night after he and family members scoured parts of New Hampshire from Haverhill to Conway and Bethlehem for his daughter, Maura.

"Maura, this is me ... like always, we will solve this," he said in a plea to his daughter through the media.

Maura, who is 5 feet, 7 inches tall and weighs about 120 pounds, was involved in a one-car accident on Wild Ammonoosuc Road about 7 p.m. Monday night.

When officers arrived at the scene, they found an abandoned black 1996 Saturn bearing Massachusetts plates.

Police determined the car belonged to Maura Murray and searched the area, but were unable to turn up anything.

Witnesses who saw the accident told police they had seen a lone woman. They also said it didn't appear the woman had been injured in the accident. When they asked if she needed help or the police, she reportedly said, "No." She left the scene before police and EMS arrived.

Police said Maura may be suicidal and headed toward the Kancamagus Highway area.

Fred Murray said he doesn't understand what prompted his daughter to leave the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, where she is a nursing student, to drive to New Hampshire.

He said it's very unusual for her just to take off. He said he had seen her Sunday afternoon and didn't suspect anything was wrong.

"I don't know exactly what you think is the matter," Murray said, again pleading to his daughter. "It isn't anything that can't be easily solved."

Murray did say Maura was upset about something that had happened over the weekend. He also said whatever it was wasn't a big deal.

Shivering in a light coat as he spoke about his daughter, Murray said he didn't know she was missing until another one of his children, Kathleen, called him Tuesday from Maura's apartment.

Haverhill police officers, he said, had called Maura's home. He made the trip to Haverhill, N.H., in the middle of the night.

Joining Murray in speaking with reporters in Bethlehem Thursday night was Bill Rausch, who is a second lieutenant with C Battery, 119th Field Artillery at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla.

Rausch said he flew out first thing Wednesday morning. When asked how he is connected to Maura, he said, "Well, her father didn't know this, but we are engaged to be engaged."

Rausch said they have been dating for several years. He also said he had spoken to Maura Sunday and as recently as Monday morning. She did not seem to be upset about anything when he spoke to her. "Everything seemed fine," he said.

While he was at the airport waiting to catch a flight out of Oklahoma, Rausch said he received a call on his cell phone in which all he heard was someone breathing. The call, he said, was traced to a calling card.

"We have talked to the chief," he said, referring to Haverhill Police Chief Jeffery Williams, "and he said they have no leads. They have stopped the search."

That bothers both Murray and Rausch. They have been told police are waiting for another lead. "Our concern," Murray said, "is getting the word out from one police department to another police department. In the meantime, we are trying to spread the word."

And that doesn't mean just law enforcement agencies in New Hampshire. They both believe Vermont and New Hampshire police agencies should be working together on this.

"That community lies right on the border," he said, referring to Haverhill. "Vermont could be helping out."

When Murray was asked why Maura had driven up to New Hampshire and may be headed toward the Kancamagus Highway area, he said the family had been visiting the area for several years to camp. "It's very familiar," he said.

Rausch and Murray spent Wednesday and Thursday handing out dozens of flyers with a picture of Maura and information describing her.

They are asking anyone who has seen Maura to contact the New Hampshire State Police at 603-846-3333 or 603-271-1170. People can also call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.

Rausch and family members plan to extend their search into Vermont Friday.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 6
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 05:04:55 pm
Boston Herald

February 14, 2004

Page: 17

Relatives searching for college student missing after crash

By Eric Convey

Relatives of a missing Hanson college student are descending on the area around Swift Water Village, N.H., to help find the one-time star athlete who disappeared after crashing her new car into a snowbank Monday.

"This is very unusual," said Fred Murray, father of Maura Murray, 21. "It's not like her to just take off."

Meanwhile, Haverhill, N.H., police said they have ended the search of the area where Murray crashed the car but continue to investigate her disappearance. A witness said she emerged from her car uninjured and disappeared when the witness left to call police.

"We are concerned for her personal welfare. There is no evidence of foul play," police Chief Jeff Williams said yesterday.

"Our concern is that she's upset or suicidal, something the family was concerned about," Williams said.

Murray's family and her Army lieutenant boyfriend have been passing out fliers with information about her in New Hampshire and in Vermont.

The area is one she knows well, having vacationed there many years with her parents.

A standout athlete in high school, Murray studied at West Point before leaving the military academy and pursuing nursing studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 7
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 05:14:46 pm
The Boston Channel

February 14, 2004

Missing Woman Mystery

HAVERHILL, NH -- There still is no sign of the young Massachusetts woman last seen in northern New Hampshire on Monday.

Friends and relatives of 21-year-old Maura Murray of Hanson, Massachusetts, have plastered the Haverhill area with posters, hoping for a tip to lead them to the woman.

The woman was last seen Monday evening after being involved in a minor car crash. Police say they have no reason to suspect foul play.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 8
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 05:16:56 pm
Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise / New Hampshire Union Leader / Lowell Sun / Nashua Telegraph / Boston Globe / Valley News

February 13/14, 2004

Notes:

Lowell Sun has different heading and additional summary in italics

Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise and Nashua Telegraph has additional text in bold, but the Nashua Telegraph adds a sentence in italics and omits the last paragraphs.

Boston Globe's headline in large bold.

The New Hampshire Union Leader ends before the Boston Globe's additional information.

The Valley news uses the words "an accident" in place of "crash" (regarding Amherst accident).

Hanson woman, 21, missing after crash

Missing person investigation for Hanson woman continues

Search for missing woman continues

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) — A missing person investigation continued Friday for a young Massachusetts woman, who disappeared earlier this week after her second car crash in three days.

Haverhill police Chief Jeff Williams said the search of the area where Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., crashed her car into a snowbank last Monday has ended, but the investigation continues. He said the hope is she will contact a family member or friend, or someone else might see her and call, he said.

“We are concerned for her personal welfare. There is no evidence of foul play,” he said.

“Our concern is that she’s Upset or suicidal, something the family was concerned about.”

Murray’s family along with her boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch, and his family have flown into the state to help. The family has been passing out fliers with her picture on both sides of the border, hoping someone might have seen her.

“This is very unusual,” said Fred Murray, her father. “It's not like her to just take off.”

Police using dogs and a helicopter and Fish and Game officers searched the immediate area of the accident and found nothing. Murray disappeared after a resident in the area went out to help her, and called police, though she asked him not to. When police arrived, she was gone, leaving behind her car, which was [undriveable.] Boston Globe variation: [which could not be driven due to the accident.]

The accident occurred on Route 112 about one mile from the Swift Water Village, and about five miles from Wells River, Vt., across the Connecticut River.

Additional Information in Nashua Telegraph: She was familiar with the area because her family vacationed in the Lincoln and Conway areas for years.

Sharon Rausch, the boyfriend’s mother who flew in with her husband, Bill, from Marengo, Ohio, to help said she had been told Murray “had made arrangements to be away from work for a week.”

She worked at an art gallery while going to nursing school at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, where she is a junior, Rausch said.

----------------------------------------------------------End Nashua Telegraph---------------------------------------------------------------------------

She said Murray crashed her car two days after wrecking her father’s car in [a crash] [an accident].

“She’s extremely responsible, an extremely frugal girl. I think she wanted to get away and get her head on straight,” Rausch said.

“We have no reason to believe she was running away.”

“She’s a jewel of a girl,” she said.

-------------------------------------------------------------Boston Globe Additional--------------------------------------------------------------------- She said Murray left an e-mail message with her son on Monday afternoon that said she wanted to talk to him.

Murray and her son met at the US Military Academy at West Point, where both were students, Rausch said. She left after 1 1/2 years. Rausch said Murray is an outstanding athlete who ran in high school and college.

-----------------------------------------------------------End Boston Globe Additional-------------------------------------------------------------------

AP FILE PHOTO

Maura Murray, of Hanson, Mass., was last seen Monday on Ammonoosuc Road in the Woodsville neighborhood of Haverhill, N.H., where she had crashed her car.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 9
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 05:18:52 pm
Boston Globe

February 15, 2004

A student vanishes, and none knows why - Woman who left crash had planned a getaway

By Peter DeMarco

Six days have passed since college student Maura Murray crashed her car on a rural highway in northern New Hampshire and disappeared without a trace. But as family, friends, and investigators continue their search for the 21-year-old Hanson native, two questions continue to baffle them: Where was Murray going, and what was she running from?

A junior in the University of Massachusetts at Amherst's nursing program, Murray was doing well in school. She had a dedicated boyfriend, a loving family, and close friends. Her father, Frederick, had just told her he wanted to buy her a new car.

But on Monday, Murray apparently decided she needed to get away from life for a while. In short order, she withdrew a few hundred dollars from an ATM machine, packed her cellphone wall charger and her favorite stuffed monkey into her Saturn, e-mailed her professors to tell them she wouldn't be in class all week, and headed north for the White Mountains.

Whatever her intended destination was, she never made it there in her car.

At about 7 that night, while taking a sharp turn on Wild Ammonoosuc Road in Woodsville, N.H., Murray lost control and slammed into a snow bank. Shaken by the accident, and apparently intoxicated, Murray told a witness she didn't need help, local police said. The witness went to call the police and by the time they arrived Murray was gone.

Using tracking dogs, helicopters, and trained searchers, local and state police, as well as state fish and game officials, covered nearly 20 miles along Route 112, but found no trace of Murray's footprints in the snow. The tracking dogs lost her scent within 100 feet of the accident, leading investigators and her loved ones to believe she either hitched a ride and continued on her way, or was abducted.

"We're all under the assumption that since the trail sort of falls off someone picked her up. We really hope she doesn't quite understand how many people have been looking for her," said high school friend Carly Muise. "Maybe if she doesn't realize that, the person who gave her a ride will and will come forward." Murray, a former top student and track star at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, is described by friends and family as a responsible, attractive young woman who is very close to her family, in particular her father, who spend yesterday checking bus stations in New Hampshire and Vermont for any signs of her.

A self-reliant woman, Murray toughed out three semesters as a chemical engineer at the US Military Academy at West Point before deciding the Army wasn't for her. Since transferring to the University of Massachusetts, she has been a successful student in the nursing program, said dean Eileen Breslin.

"Nursing students are very responsible. That's part of her character," said Breslin.

If Murray was troubled by something, family and friends said, it might have been a small car accident she got into last Saturday night, when she damaged her father's new Toyota.

The day after the accident, she called her boyfriend, Army Lieutenant Bill Rausch, who is stationed in Oklahoma, in tears. A day later, on Monday, she got into her Saturn and headed north.

Rausch, who got a leave of absence from the Army, arrived in New Hampshire on Thursday. Joined by his parents, who drove from Ohio, and by Murray's father and some of her siblings, Rausch has spent the past few days driving across both New Hampshire and Vermont, stopping at local gas stations, bus stations, and police headquarters, asking whether anyone has seen Murray.

Yesterday morning, Rausch and his father were told that Murray might have been at a McDonald's in St. Johnsbury, Vt. They drove there, but no one had seen her.

"Obviously, we're hoping for the best. If I just got some news, although I guess no news is good news," Rausch said.

Rausch said Murray fled with a backpack, but left many of the other items she'd packed, including the stuffed monkey he gave her and her favorite book, "Without Peril," behind in her car.

A witness told local police Murray appeared to have been intoxicated at the time of the crash, and Rausch said that there was an open bottle of alcohol in the car. However, he said he'd never known Murray to drink and drive, and guessed she might have fled out of fear she'd broken the law.

Breslin, UMass's nursing dean, said Murray had e-mailed a professor on Monday indicating she needed to take time off because of a "family problem" and will return to class this week.

Her family and friends, have since spend hours plastering missing posters and calling news agencies to get her picture and story out.

"I'm hoping someone will see her and call someone to let us know she's all right. We're just sitting on eggshells waiting for that," said Laurie Murray, Murray's mother, a nurse at the Samuel Marcus Nursing Home in Weymouth.

New Hampshire State Police have posted her photo on national missing persons databases, and have promised to follow any leads. So far, they have none.

"It's a difficult one," said Sgt. Robert Bruno, detective supervisor. "I wish I has more to tell you."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 10
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:34:25 pm
Boston Herald

February 16, 2004

Page 4

Missing woman's dad: Searchers waited

By Marie Szaniszlo

Police in New Hampshire waited 36 hours before launching a full-scale search for a University of Massachusetts nursing student who vanished last week after crashing into a snowbank, according to the woman's father.

"I'm getting more scared by the hour," Maura Murray's father, Frederick, said yesterday from a motel near the Vermont state line. "Time could be running out for her. People just don't vanish."

Haverhill police and paramedics looked for the 21-year-old Hanson, Mass., native shortly after 7 p.m. Feb. 9, when an elderly couple reported that a car had crashed near their home on a sharp turn on Route 112.

But it was not until two days later that a state police helicopter, search-and-rescue dogs and New Hampshire Fish and Game officials began an intensive search because Haverhill police assumed she was likely a drunken driver who had left the scene, they told Frederick Murray. A witness whose help she declined told police she appeared to be intoxicated, and a bottle of alcohol was found in her car.

Tracking dogs ultimately lost her scent within 100 feet of the accident, leading investigators to believe she hitched a ride.

Since then, Murray's family, her boyfriend and his parents have driven from New Hampshire to Vermont to Maine, distributing fliers with her photograph and a plea for anyone with information about her whereabouts to call state police.

Until then, why she left remains as much a mystery as where she went. A star athlete who majored in engineering at West Point for three semesters, Murray transferred in 2002 to UMass-Amherst, where she regularly made the dean's list.

Last Thursday, she received an "upsetting" phone call at the art gallery where she worked, her father said, but he did not know what it concerned. That Saturday, she got into an accident with his car, and called her boyfriend Sunday in tears.

The next day she sent three e-mails: one to her boyfriend saying she wanted to talk and the others to a professor and the gallery saying she would be away for the next week to resolve some "family concerns."

Then she withdrew a few hundred dollars at an ATM and left for the White Mountains.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 11
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:35:48 pm
WCAX

February 16, 2004

Search Continues For Missing Woman

Family, Friends Find No Sign Of Woman Missing For Week

Bath, N.H. -- Family and friends continued to search Monday for a Massachusetts woman missing for one week after a car accident.

Maura Murray, 21, was last seen following a car accident in Woodsville, N.H. Police said there is no evidence of foul play, but they are treating it as a missing-person investigation and said they have no new information.

Murray was last seen on Route 112, and as her father searched the roadway Monday, he said that he needs to stay focused on finding her.

"I don't want to go back without her," Fred Murray said. "I can't face the ride going back in an empty car."

Maura Murray's boyfriend, Bill Rausch, was also searching again Monday. Her family and friends said they don't know what else to do. They've covered a 50-mile radius from Woodsville with posters, but police said there is still no sign of her. Her father believes she's no longer in the area.

"I think she accepted a ride at the scene of the accident, which would enable her to get closer to public transportation, and she got out by bus," Fred Murray said.

Family members can't say why Murray would have wandered away. She left her University of Massachusetts dorm last Monday, e-mailing her professors that she'd be gone for a week. She didn't tell her parents or boyfriend what she planned.

"If she could've, she would've contacted me, so I think she's being held against her will," Fred Murray said. "I'm afraid to think of what could've happened."

Murray's relatives said they are not giving up hope and plan to stay in the area as long as it takes to find her. Police urged anyone who might have seen her to call them at (603) 846-3333.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 12
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:38:17 pm
The Patriot Ledger

February 16, 2004

Hanson woman, 21, still missing after crash

By Elizabeth Smallcomb

HANSON - Family members and friends are anxiously awaiting news about the whereabouts of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, who disappeared after her car crashed in northern New Hampshire.

‘‘I haven't heard a word,'' her mother, Laurie Murray, said yesterday after talking to police in New Hampshire.

Maura Murray, a junior nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was in a single-vehicle accident last Monday on Route 112 in Woodsville, N.H. She refused help and walked away from the accident scene.

Friends and family describe Murray as intelligent and responsible, and they say it is uncharacteristic for her to have no contact with family.

Elizabeth Drewniak of Hanson, a close friend, said that after talking with Murray's family and boyfriend, all indications are that something made Murray decide she needed to get away.

Murray's father, Frederick; her brothers, Frederick and Kurtis; her sister, Kathleen; and her boyfriend, Army Lt. William Rausch of Oklahoma, are distributing fliers in New Hampshire near the Vermont border.

Police in New Hampshire called off their search after three days without any leads. They are investigating cell phone and debit card records, hoping they lead to Murray.

Haverhill, N.H., Police Chief Jeff Williams said last week that no evidence of foul play was found.

Maura Murray was an honors student and one of the top cross-country and track-and-field runners in the state during her years at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, from which she graduated in 2000. She continued running at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where she studied for three semesters before transferring to UMass to study nursing.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 13
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:40:12 pm
CNN - American Morning

February 17, 2004

Mystery Disappearance

SOLEDAD O'BRIEN, CNN ANCHOR: The disappearance of a Massachusetts nursing student has her family, her friends and police now searching for answers. Twenty-one-year-old Maura Murray was last seen a week ago, after her car crashed on a rural highway in northern New Hampshire. Despite a frantic search, Maura's trail seems to have vanished.

Joining us this morning from a motel in Wells River, Vermont, which has now become a home base for the searchers, Maura's father, Fred Murray, and her boyfriend, Army Lieutenant Bill Rausch.

Thank you for joining us, gentlemen, both of you. I appreciate it. I know this is such a strained and difficult story.

Lieutenant Rausch, I'd like to start with you. The details are bizarre. Maura disappeared on Monday under very strange circumstances. Why don't you describe what you know about what happened?

LT. BILL RAUSCH, U.S. ARMY, MISSING WOMAN'S BOYFRIEND: Well, as far as we know, we are not exactly sure what did happen. However, I did receive a phone call from Maura as well as an e-mail Monday afternoon that said that she wanted to talk with me and for me to call her back.

I received Tuesday morning last week right after the accident another voice mail, a chilling voice mail that was what I believed to be Maura whimpering and crying in the background.

O'BRIEN: Did she say anything in that message, anything specific? Or was it only what you can hear was crying?

RAUSCH: I could only hear breathing, and then towards the end of the voice mail I heard what was apparent to be crying and then a whimper, which I'm certain was Maura.

O'BRIEN: Mr. Murray, let's back up a little bit. Maura had taken some money out of the ATM, had e-mailed her professor saying that she was going to miss some classes because of a family situation, and gotten in her car and headed north. Does anyone have any idea where she was headed, where she was going?

FRED MURRAY, FATHER OF MISSING STUDENT: We think because of the general direction she was traveling that she was going to an area that she's familiar with, which would be up in the White Mountains where we used to camp and hike. But the whole thing came on so suddenly that I know the night before she had no such plans. I spoke to her, and she was due to talk to me Monday night, but I don't think she was able to.

O'BRIEN: Was it typical at all for her to throw stuff in a car and say, hey, you know, I'm going to get out of town for a couple of days and just, you know, make a snap decision like that overnight? Or would that be very unusual for her?

MURRAY: She had never done it before, and no one that knows her can explain it. She's a very dependable kid, and she follows through on what she says she's going to do. And, again, I don't think that she was able to in this case.

O'BRIEN: She called you on a voice mail, Lieutenant Rausch, after this accident, and a local person stopped to help her, and she kind of waved them off. They say maybe she had been drinking even, but waved them off and said, no, no, no, I'm fine, I'm fine. She had sort of plowed into a little bit of a snow bank. Give me a sense of what the locals have been able to tell you about what happened after that, the last person who saw her, because other people saw her around the car, isn't that right?

RAUSCH: Yes. In fact, according to the local authorities, as well as eyewitnesses, Maura was seen at the vehicle not more than a minute before the authorities arrived at the scene, which leads us to believe that she was either picked up by an individual immediately after eyewitnesses saw her, or she walked up the road and was picked up then. The police themselves conducted a very thorough search with the Fish and Game folks here in the area, and with a dog scent leading only a few hundred feet from the accident and abruptly stopping, which again suggests that someone did, in fact, pick her up.

O'BRIEN: So, with her professor saying that nursing students are notoriously reliable young people, what do you think has happened? Do you think that there has been foul play at all? Do you think, especially in light of this phone message that you have of crying and whimpering, do you have any theories on what might have happened to Maura?

RAUSCH: Well, we're uncertain obviously of exactly did happen. But as Fred said, this is completely out of character in regard to her not being able to contact us. She had planned to call Fred that evening, her father. She had planned on calling me, wanted me to return her phone call. And if she were able to do so, we are 100 percent certain that she would have done exactly that.

O'BRIEN: Well, we're showing her picture, and we're certainly hopeful that if anybody has seen her or anyone has any information about Maura Murray that they will get in touch with you immediately. Obviously lots of people are worried about the status of this young woman.

Thank you for talking with us this morning. We certainly we wish you the best of luck in your search.

RAUSCH: Thank you.

MURRAY: Thank you.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 14
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:42:05 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

February 17, 2004

Search for missing Mass. woman goes on

HAVERHILL (AP) -- There still is no sign of the young Massachusetts woman last seen in northern New Hampshire on Feb. 9. State police said they have received many new leads, but they have turned up little information.

Friends and relatives of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson have plastered the Haverhill area with posters, hoping for a tip to lead them to the woman.

Murray withdrew $280 from a Massachusetts ATM early last week, and e-mailed professors saying she wouldn't be in class all week to attend to a family problem.

The woman was last seen after being involved in a minor car crash. Police say they have no reason to suspect foul play.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 15
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:43:49 pm
Boston Globe

February 17, 2004

With no word from missing student, family's hopes dim - Kin of 21-year-old suspect foul play

By Ralph Ranalli

For all the questions torturing relatives of University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray, one thing is increasingly certain. The fact that she has not contacted them in more than a week since disappearing from a rural New Hampshire roadside, they say, means something is terribly wrong. Murray's father, mother, and boyfriend said yesterday they now believe and fear that the 21-year-old Hanson native is a victim of foul play.

"She is just a skinny, little girl, and I am getting more scared by the hour," Frederick Murray, Maura's father, said in a telephone interview from Woodsville, N.H., where his daughter disappeared Feb. 9 after crashing her Saturn into a snowbank.

Relatives have been searching in and around the small towns near the Vermont border where Maura Murray vanished, posting fliers and interviewing witnesses. As best they can determine, Murray got a ride from someone in a car shortly before police arrived at the accident scene on Wild Ammonoosuc Road, said her boyfriend, US Army Lieutenant William Rausch.

No one saw her do so, but residents on the street saw her standing on the road before police arrived, and search dogs lost her scent less than 100 yards from her wrecked car, Rausch said.

"It seems apparent that she most certainly jumped in a vehicle," Rausch said. "An older couple who lives here put her at [the Saturn] one minute before the police arrived."

Given the preparations Murray had apparently made for a trip, relatives had hoped for much of the last week that she may have wanted to be by herself or that she was too embarrassed to call home after crashing a second car in three days.

At the time she left Amherst, relatives said, Murray had been upset that she had crashed her father's car two days earlier. Before heading north toward the White Mountains, Murray withdrew a few hundred dollars from an ATM machine, packed her cellphone wall charger and her favorite stuffed monkey into her Saturn, and e-mailed her professors to tell them she would not be in class all week because of a "family problem."

But with each passing day, hopes that she abandoned her car, hitched a ride, and continued her journey are fading, her mother said. It would be out of character for her daughter not to call, her mother said. "She knows I'm a worrier," Laurie Murray of Weymouth said.

Also out of character, family members said, were reports from witnesses that Murray appeared to be intoxicated just after the crash. Murray, a former top student and track standout at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, is described by friends and family as a responsible young woman who is very close to her family, particularly her father.

She spent three semesters as a chemical engineer at the US Military Academy at West Point before transferring to the nursing program at UMass.

New Hampshire State Police have opened a missing-person investigation into Murray's disappearance and posted her photo on a national law enforcement database. A spokesman said yesterday there were no new developments in the case.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 16
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:46:02 pm
Massachusetts Daily Collegian

February 17, 2004

Missing student a mystery to police, classmates

Erica Lovley and Ferron Salneer

Police are investigating the disappearance of a University of Massachusetts student who was last seen at the site of a car crash on Monday, Feb. 9.

According to the Boston Globe, Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass. crashed her car into a snow bank last Monday in Haverhill, N.H. The accident was her second in three days; Murray had recently crashed her father’s car on Saturday of the previous weekend.

Murray disappeared from the site of the crash after a resident tried to help and who had called the police, despite Murray asking him not to, the Globe reported. Murray was gone upon arrival of police, her car left abandoned and undrivable, the Globe said.

Chief Jeff Williams of the Haverhill Police Department does not think foul play was involved.

“Our concern is that she’s upset or suicidal, something the family was concerned about,” he told the Globe on Friday.

The accident took place along Route 112, about five miles away from Wells River, Vt., and a mile away from Swift Water Village by the Connecticut River.

Police used dogs, a helicopter and Fish and Game Officers to perform an immediate search around the crash site area and found nothing. The search has since been called off.

Murray is a junior nursing major, a Dean’s List student who works in a local art gallery.

Two UMPD officers, Detectives Chris Thrasher and Brian Davies and two counselors from Mental Health Services visited a junior nursing class, Parent-Child Nursing, on Friday afternoon. Joan Cully, administrative director of the Office for the Advancement of Nursing Education and Eileen Breslin, dean of the school of Nursing were also present at the meeting.

In addition, an email was written by Breslin, and released to the UMass nursing community. According to the email, Murray sent an email to her faculty Monday afternoon at 1:24 p.m. indicating she was heading home for the week due to a death in the family and that she would contact everyone when she returned.

Lindsay Pemberton, a junior nursing major, has the same class schedule as Murray and was present for the meeting on Friday. Pemberton told The Massachusetts Daily Collegian that staff in the nursing department spoke to Murray’s family, and were told that there were no recent family deaths.

“Also, her dorm room was all packed up, like she was planning on moving out,” said Pemberton.

The email to the nursing community also stated that Murray called her boyfriend, Army Lieutenant Bill Rausch, Tuesday morning. At the Friday meeting police said that Rausch only heard someone breathing on the other line. The police were unable to trace the call.

According to Sharon Rausch, the boyfriend’s mother, Murray had e-mailed her boyfriend on Monday afternoon, saying she needed to speak with him.

Murray’s family, including Rausch, and his parents, have flown to New England and are passing out fliers along the New Hampshire-Vermont state boarder, hoping someone will recognize Murray.

“She was really quiet and didn’t hang out with any of us,” said Pemberton. “She was a sweet person, but she didn’t get personal with anyone.”

Murray and Rausch met at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. As of yesterday afternoon, the Haverhill police have had no leads in the case and hope that Murray will try to contact a friend or family member.

“The case is under investigation and we are not discussing it at this time,” said the Haverhill Police Department.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 17
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:47:04 pm
Boston Herald

February 18, 2004

Page 12

FBI offers to help search for missing woman in N.H.

By Marie Szaniszlo

The FBI has offered to help investigate the case of a University of Massachusetts nursing student who vanished in the White Mountains nine days ago. But local New Hampshire authorities so far have declined the bureau's help, the woman's family and friends said yesterday.

Gail Marcinkiewicz, a spokeswoman for the FBI in Boston, said the bureau has offered to help search for 21-year-old Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass., who disappeared after her car slid into a snowbank on Route 112 in Woodsville, N.H., on Feb. 9.

But friends who have spent the last week scouring two states for the former West Point cadet said Chief Jeffrey Williams, one of the Haverhill Police Department's two officers, said he would welcome the FBI's help - if he needed it.

"All we're asking is to find Maura," said Christine McDonald, who joined the search last week with her husband, a West Point professor. "And if the local authorities don't have the forces to work daily and with more than a couple of officers, the FBI has to get involved. It's been too long already."

Williams has not returned phone calls from reporters this week and has reprimanded Murray's family and friends for talking to the media and attempting to find her, searchers have said.

"We've been walking a tightrope not to upset these people," said one woman, who asked not to be identified.

Police waited until last Wednesday morning, 36 hours after she vanished, before launching a full-scale search. Dogs lost her scent 100 yards from her car.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 18
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:48:21 pm
Journal Opinion

February 18, 2004

Pages 1 & 12

Woman still missing after snowbank accident

WOODSVILLE -- It has been one week since Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, MA, crashed her car into a snowbank on Route 112 in Swiftwater and refused assistance by local residents. She has not been seen since.

Ar approximately 7 p.m. on Feb. 9, Haverhill Police Sgt. Cecil Smith responded to a reported one-vehicle accident on Wild Ammonoosuc Road (Route 112). He found the 1996 black Saturn abandoned by Murray. Witnesses who spoke to Murray reported that she appeared intoxicated but unhurt and refused assistance. She left the accident scene before police arrived.

A search of the area was conducted by the Haverhill Police Department, New Hampshire Fish and Game, New Hampshire State Police from Troop F and a state police helicopter. As of Feb. 14, the Haverhill Police had called off the search for Murray, but the investigation continues.

The Lincoln and Conway regions reportedly are well known to the Murray family and the missing girl. The family has vacationed in the area for years. Family Members from Massachusetts, Murray's boyfriend, Bill Rausch, from Oklahoma, and his parents from Ohio have searched the length of the Kancamagus highway in hopes of finding her.

They have posted fliers with Murray's picture at hotels and stores throughout the area. Family members are hoping that she took a ride with someone as there were few footprints near the car.

The father of the missing girl, Fred Murray, said he was concerned that the girl is troubled and possibly suicidal. A phone call to Rausch, on Feb. 10, is the only possible lead. When Rausch answered the call there was only breathing on the other end. The call made to Rausch's cell phone was dialed using a phone card. Police are attempting to track the origin of the card.

Murray is a white female with brown shoulder-length hair and blue eyes, approximately 5'7" tall and weighing 120 pounds. She was last seen wearing jeans and a dark-colored coat. The Haverhill Police Department asks that anyone who has seen Murray contact them at (603) 787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 19
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:49:57 pm
Burlington Free Press / Lowell Sun / The New Hampshire Union Leader / Portsmouth Herald / Caledonian Record

Wednesday, February 18, 2004

Note: The Portsmouth Herald adds the paragraphs in Italics, but omits the paragraph in bold. Its alternative headline is in Italics.

DISAPPEARED AFTER N.H. CAR ACCIDENT

Father: Search for his Mass. daughter stagnant

Father: Search for daughter has become stagnant

College student last seen after crashing car into snowbank

By J.M . HIRSCH

Associated Press Writer

The investigation into the disappearance of a Massachusetts woman last seen more than a week ago in northern New Hampshire has become stagnant, the woman’s father said yesterday.

“There’s no new leads, no new evidence,” Frederick Murray said of the search for Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student who disappeared after a car accident in Woodsville, N.H. “Its stagnant at the moment.”

He blamed the lack of leads on a shortage of resources, saying that though local police were working hard, he wished the small department had more help so it could broaden its search.

“Results are slow in coming. Like the bus stations. Did she leave from a local bus station? That hasn’t been investigated, so I did it myself,” Mr. Murray said, adding that his efforts turned up nothing.

“The police are good guys,” he said. “But there aren’t many of them.”

Authorities said Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student from Hanson, Mass., withdrew $280 from an ATM on Feb. 9 and emailed professors saying she wouldn’t be in class all week because of a family problem.

Around 7 p.m. that evening she crashed her car into a snowbank on Route 112 in New Hampshire several miles from the Vermont border. Police say a witness offered help, but that Murray refused and told the witness not to call police.

The witness, who later told police Murray appeared intoxicated but uninjured at the time, called authorities anyway. But by the time emergency workers arrived, Murray was gone. Most of her belongings were left behind in the car.

On Feb. 11 a police dog was brought to the scene, but was able to track her for only 100 yards, prompting her family to conclude that she got a ride. A police helicopter and ground search also turned up no evidence.

Mr. Murray said yesterday that his daughter may have been distraught at the time, in part because just two days earlier she had been involved in another accident. Police described Maura Murray as “endangered and possibly suicidal.”

Since then, Maura Murray’s family, her boyfriend and his family have come to area to help in the search and hand posters through out New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont.

Mr. Murray no longer believes his daughter is in the area, adding to his frustration that the police lack the resources to do more.

Mr. Murray is convinced foul play is involved, thought authorities have yet to find evidence of it. Still, he holds out hope that perhaps she just needed to get away.

He wants the FBI to get involved, but was told there needs to be evidence of foul play first.

**Burlington Free Press from below. **

"But you can't get evidence because you don't have the force enough to go out there and get it." he added "Do you wait until you have a body to have evidence and you can call the FBI in? Isn't is possible to expand a little and pound a little harder?"

A spokeswoman for the Haverhill Police Department which is handling the case, would not comment except to say that the investigation was ongoing.

"Just tell us you're OK," he urged her. "Don't come back if you don't want to. Just tell us you're OK. ... She would if she could but I don't think she is able to, for whatever reason that is."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 20
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:52:11 pm
The Caledonian-Record

February 18, 2004

Missing Woman

Police Chasing Regionwide Leads

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL NEW HAMPSHIRE - Haverhill police officers and detectives from New Hampshire State Police Troop F are receiving leads from all points in New England regarding a missing 21-year-old Massachusetts woman.

"This search has gone nationwide," Haverhill Police Chief Jeffery Williams said in a phone conversation late Tuesday afternoon.

Williams' four-person police department, which includes himself, has been investigating the disappearance of Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass. They, along with detectives from Troop F, have been receiving leads from all over New England.

Murray is 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighs about 120 pounds and has long dark brown hair and blue eyes, She was involved in a one-car accident about 7 p.m. Feb. 9.

Her car failed to negotiate a sharp curve and went off the road. Her father, Fred Murray, said it was a minor accident.

A resident who lives near the accident scene told police Murray was asked if she wanted police or emergency medical services called. She reportedly said no. That was the last time anyone has seen the young woman, who reportedly crashed her father's vehicle two days before she crashed her own car, a black 1996 Saturn bearing Massachusetts plates.

According to police, Murray was not injured in the accident. However, she was reportedly impaired due to alcohol consumption when she was seen by her car after her accident.

Williams said his department has received a number of calls in connection with Murray's disappearance, but he will not comment on them because of the ongoing investigation.

The person who saw Murray after the accident also was at the scene when officers arrived.

Williams wouldn't comment concerning what the witness had said about Murray's disappearance between the time of the accident and the time officers arrived.

"We don't know if someone picked her up," Williams said. "We are certainly concerned about that (possibility). We are getting leads from all over New England. It's a national investigation at this point."

Maura's father and her fiance, Bill Rausch, who is a second lieutenant with C Battery, 119th Field Artillery at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla., have been joined by relatives and friends in their search for the 21-year-old woman. She is a student in the University of Massachusetts nursing program at Amherst.

They have been scouring areas on both sides of the Connecticut River, hoping to find someone who may have seen Maura or have information as to what happened to her after the accident.

Williams said although a search for her was called off last week, the investigation is continuing. He said New Hampshire Fish and Game is in charge of searches. "I don't see a need for a search until we have a (solid) lead," Williams said.

In addition to officers from his department, and detectives, including Sgt. Bob Bruno from Troop F, Vermont State Police also are playing a part in the investigation.

Williams said information about Murray as been entered into the National Crime Information Center computer systems.

Anyone who has seen Murray is asked to contact the New Hampshire State Police at 603-846-3333 or 603-271-1170. People also can call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 21
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:55:07 pm
WCAX

February 19, 2004

Police Suspend Search for Missing Woman

Haverhill, New Hampshire - Police used a helicopter and scent dogs to search two square miles of the wooded area where 21-year-old Maura Murray was last seen. But still, no sign of the missing college student.

"We were not able to come up with any conclusive clues for us to continue,"said Lt. Todd Bogardus of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Police say Murray told her employer she'd be gone for a week to deal with some family issues. She drove to New Hampshire and crashed her car on this sharp curve on Route 112 in Haverhill. She told witnesses she did not want help and took off before police arrived, leaving her car behind.

"This is unprecedented. She's not irresponsible. For her not to call, means to me she is not able to call, and that frightens me," says Fred Murray, Maura's father.

Maura's family and friends have plastered her picture on 1,500 posters all over New Hampshire and Vermont, hoping someone has seen her.

"The way we're getting through is the same way we want Maura to get through, just not giving up. We're not giving up and we don't want her to give up," says Bill Rausch, Maura's boyfriend.

The search party has taken over a Wells River motel, looking for leads, waiting and hoping. They say they're frustrated Maura was last seen on February 9th, but police didn't start looking for her until February 11th, 36 hours later.

"This is a rural area, not many people, not much crime, so when something big comes up, it's a strain on the capabilities of the local police," says Fred Murray.

Police stress that even though their formal search has ended, this case is still very much open. They want to hear from anyone who may have seen Maura Murray.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 22
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:56:57 pm
Valley News

February 19, 2004

Family Searches for College Student Missing Since Feb. 9

Bob Hookway, Valley News Staff Writer

North Haverhill -- Fred Murray sat in his room at the Wells River Motel yesterday morning and recalled when his 21-year-old daughter, Maura, was a little girl in third grade, and he'd teach her and her friends to play basketball.

“I'd say, ‘Run over there and stop!' and she would. Then I'd say, ‘OK, now run back over here and stop on this mark!' and they all would,” he said, laughing as he remembered the little girls being so eager to do everything just right and learn the game properly.

Murray, a nuclear medical technician from Hanson, Mass., is trim and well groomed. It's easy to see the father of four usually doesn't look anywhere near his 61 years. But that’s not true this week. As the days pass with no word from his daughter -- a University of Massachusetts nursing student who vanished from Route 112 in North Haverhill on the night of Feb. 9 -- Murray is a very worried man. His face shows the strain. He's worried that Maura Murray got into the wrong car after she plowed her black, 1996 Saturn into a snowbank on a sharp curve and apparently decided not to stick around until police showed up to investigate the crash.

He's worried because police are virtually certain that she left the area in a vehicle. Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams said Tuesday there were no tracks in the snow around the crash site, and a state police search dog lost Maura Murray's scent quickly.

“It seems likely she got in a car. It could've been a good guy. It could've been a bad guy,” said Fred Murray, who is worried primarily that something bad has happened to his daughter to prevent the normally reliable former West Point cadet from contacting him, her boyfriend, her friends or any of the people she usually keeps in touch with regularly.

Two days before the North Haverhill accident, Maura Murray had smashed up her father's new car in an accident in Hadley, Mass., not far from the University of Massachusetts campus in Amherst where she's a junior.

Fred Murray said yesterday that he and his daughter's boyfriend, Bill Rausch of Marengo, Ohio, as well as her friends and siblings have been trying to figure out if her stress over the first accident would have been enough to cause her to withdraw $280 from her bank account and tell her employers at an art gallery that she'd be away for a week.

“She was upset because of the accident in my car. She felt she had disappointed me, let me down like any kid would. I don't think it was anything serious.”

He said Maura headed for the North Country because it was familiar territory for her.

The family had vacationed for years in the Lincoln, N.H., and Conway, N.H., area, he said, and liked to climb 10,000-foot peaks. Asked if there was one special place she might have headed for, her father said “Yes,” in Bartlett, N.H.

“I've checked. Nobody's been there,” he said.

He and his son, Fred Jr., 33, also of Hanson, Mass., have hit all the campgrounds they could find that their family used over the years. They were all locked down and snowed in.

Maura's boyfriend, Bill Rauch, 23, is an Army lieutenant stationed at Ft. Sill, Okla. He's in another room at the Wells River Motel.

Last night, he dropped in on his parents, Bill and Sharon Rauch of Marengo, Ohio, in their room there, and said he's dreading reporting back for duty some 2,000 miles away if Maura hasn't turned up by the weekend.

“We were just talking about the future the other day,” he said, during one of the regular phone calls he had with Maura.

Though not officially engaged yet, he said it was clear to everyone the couple planned to marry, and he was going to get out of the service so they could start a family.

New Hampshire State Police let family members retrieve Maura's belongings from the Saturn.

Bill Rauch is holding on to her favorite stuffed animal, “Joseph,” a monkey that she had in the car with her.

The Rauches said they're doing their best to remain upbeat and positive.

Sharon Rauch said she thinks often of Elizabeth Smart, the Utah girl who was kidnapped and was missing for months before police found her and brought her home.

“He misses her terribly,” she said of her son. “It's strange, but when I see her picture on the television, it's hard to believe we’re in the middle of this. Is this just a really bad dream, or is it real?” she asked.

Fred Murray and his son returned to the motel last night after spending much of the day combing the snowy woods in the White Mountains National Forest not far from the Haverhill site where Maura was last seen. Her father said he followed boot prints over about a half-mile of rugged terrain before he saw a clear enough print to determine that they had been made by boots larger that his daughter's size 8(e?) shoes.

Murray said his and Rauch's family members had, in the past week, papered the area with posters bearing his daughter's photos, from central Vermont to Fryeburg, Maine. and searched behind miles of roadside snowbanks.

No one could fail to see the “missing person” notices at the Swiftwater Stage Stop, a log-cabin style convenience store not far from the spot where Maura Murray vanished.

Owner Wini Matteson has them posted on her front door and at the checkout counter. She said yesterday that the disappearance has been a major topic of conversation among customers.

“Everybody has an opinion. There just isn't anything concrete. But the more time that goes by, the worse it looks,” she said.

Meanwhile yesterday, a school bus driver, Butch Atwood, whose home is within sight of the crash scene, said he was just about to park his bus on that Monday night at about 8 p.m. when he spotted a car nearly sideways on the road. He rushed down to see if he could help.

“She spun on the curve. She had no lights on, and it was a dark car. I could just about see it. I put my flashlight in the window. She was behind the airbag. All I could see was from her mouth up,” Atwood said yesterday as he stood in his driveway and pointed to the accident spot.

“I yelled in, and she said she was OK. She was shaking, as anyone would be if they'd just been in an accident,” the 57-year-old Atwood said. He described Murray's struggle to squeeze her way out through the driver’s door of the car that he said had sustained considerable front-end damage.

“I told her I was going to run up to the house and call the police. She said, ‘No, no, no, please don't! I already called triple A.' Well, under my breath, I said, that’s a lie. You can’t make a cell call from here,” Atwood said. Cellular reception is poor throughout the area.

Despite the young woman's protests, Atwood said he did summon police, but when he went back outside, she was gone.

“I guess I was the last one to see her. I heard a couple of cars go by when I was on the phone. But I didn't see her get in a car, and I don't know which way she went. We’re all just dumbfounded by this,” Atwood said.

A couple of drivers along Route 112 yesterday afternoon got a surprise when they took a curve then had to hit the brakes quickly as they encountered one tall police chief and two state troopers walking toward them in the roadway.

Williams and Lt. John Scarinza, the Twin Mountain troop commander, plus his second-in-command, Sgt. Tom Yorke, examined the crash scene and the surrounding area once again.

The Haverhill chief declined to say exactly what the three were doing.

But he did say, although there were no new developments yesterday, he was not ready just yet to go along with the fears of family members that Maura Murray has been the victim of foul play.

“If any Good Samaritan picked her up, please call us. If that's all it is, that person hasn't done anything wrong. She’s an adult, and if she wants to be missing, that's fine. We’d just like to know what happened,” Williams said.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 23
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 07:59:24 pm
The Boston Channel

February 19, 2004

Police, Family Search For Missing Woman

Woman Disappears After Car Crash

HAVERHILL, N.H. -- Police and relatives in Grafton County are searching for a Massachusetts woman who disappeared after a car crash.

Maura Murray, 21, hasn't been seen since Monday night, when she crashed her 1996 black Saturn on Route 112 in the Woodsville neighborhood of Haverhill. Police arrived at the scene to find her care but no sign of the University of Massachusetts student. A witness reported seeing Murray looking impaired the night of the accident.

"She might be afraid she might get in trouble, but we just want to let her know it is fine," said her sister, Kathleen Murray. "We just want her to come home." Police said they were able to find few clues at the scene of the accident.

"We did an intense search of the crash scene area for evidence that she may have walked into the woods, but nothing like that was uncovered," Police Chief Jeff Williams said.

Haverhill police have been working with state police and the Fish and Game Department to find Murray while her family and friends have been driving around the region posting signs hoping someone may give them a clue to where she is. "I feel badly for the family and hope that she is OK," resident Winnie Matteson said.

Searchers are canvassing an area from Haverhill along the Kancamangus Highway to North Conway. The area is like a second home to Murray. She has come to the region with her family since she was a child. Relatives said they believe Murray may have been upset about something.

"We love her. She is the best," Kathleen Murray said. "She has a lot of family and friends. We love her. We just want to see her come home safe."

Maura Murray is described as 5 feet, 7 inches, weighing 120 pounds, with shoulder-length, brown hair. She was last seen wearing jeans and a dark coat.

Anyone with any information on the case is asked to contact police at (603) 787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 24
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:01:46 pm
The Patriot Ledger

February 20, 2004

FBI seeking clues to disappearance from Hanson family

By Joe McGee

Boston FBI agents have joined in the search for Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student from Hanson who disappeared more than a week ago after an accident on a snowy New Hampshire road.

New Hampshire search and rescue teams, meanwhile, made one last attempt at searching the mountainous, rural area of Route 112 in Woodsville, N.H., where the 21-year-old was last seen on Feb. 9.

For reasons that remain unclear, Murray had driven to northern New Hampshire that day from the UMass campus in Amherst, where she went to school.

Authorities have suggested from the information they have that Murray may have run away and doesn't want to be found, while family members say she may have been kidnapped.

The terrain in the area where she was last seen is rough and wooded, and the National Forest Service has warned that anyone lost there in the winter cold could perish.

Police, however, said they still consider Murray a missing person, while they don't believe foul play was involved in her disappearance.

‘‘What we asked the FBI to do was to do a background investigation, talking to family members, so hopefully we can generate ideas as to what she was thinking or where she was going. Other than that, we're doing all we can,'' Lt. John Scarinza, commander of New Hampshire State Police Troop F, said.

According to police, sometime before Feb. 9, Murray downloaded directions to Burlington, Vt., from her dorm room computer. She sent an E-mail to her professors and place where she work saying she needed a week off because of ‘‘family problems,'' and left Amherst with $280 cash and a few personal items.

At about 7 p.m. on Feb. 9, the car she was driving hit a snow bank in Woodsville, a town near the Vermont border on Route 112, which locals call Wild Ammonoosuc Road. She refused help from bystanders and was gone when police in the rural town arrived.

At the accident scene, there were no footprints left in the snow and bloodhounds could not pick up her scent.

While there may be clues suggesting Murray wanted time alone and away from campus, family members believe someone picked her up from the accident scene. Running away isn't like Maura, they said.

‘‘She would've contacted someone, her boyfriend or someone. I can't see her running away. She knows how I worry,'' Lauri Murray, Maura's mother, said.

The only personal problem Murray had recently was that the accident was the second vehicle accident she had had in three days. Friends said little things like that might set off a focused person like Maura, a former standout athlete and honors student at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School who attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point for a year.

‘‘Top notch. She was one of my brightest students,'' said John Souther, Murray's advanced placement calculus teacher at Whitman-Hanson.

Souther offered to help family members search in New Hampshire this week, one of many who have called the family to lend their support.

Erin Devine, a George Washington University student and high school classmate of Maura's, said she is doing what she can from Washington, D.C.

‘‘I haven't lost hope. I've been working with a criminal psychology professor. We talked about it all day during class today and we're trying to do something about it. I called the police up there and even the U.S. Embassy in Canada,'' Devine said.

Although Murray's father has expressed concern that not enough has been done to help find his daughter, police said they have followed procedures normal to investigating a missing adult case.

Scarinza said search efforts began 36 hours after the accident. That may seem like a long time, but it was for good reason, he said. Witnesses reported that Murray was drunk and so it was thought she fled the scene to avoid arrest. A further complication, authorities have said, was that the vehicle was registered to her father, not her.

‘‘With all those facts, it's not unusual that the person wanted to leave and did not want to be found,'' said Scarinza.

Crews fanned out for three days in the mountainous region before the search was called off.

A dozen people resumed the search yesterday on foot and in a helicopter. Scarinza said that was more than enough manpower to scan the rural terrain.

It was likely the last time a search crew will venture into the woods. If Murray had wandered off the road, finding her would be easy because there is about 1½ feet of snow on the ground, Scarinza said. and it has not snowed since Feb. 9.

Anyone with information that might help investigators is asked to call state police at 603-846-3333, or Haverhill police at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 25
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:04:08 pm
The Brockton Enterprise

February 20, 2004

Investigators say Murray probably left in another vehicle

By Elaine Allegrini, Enterprise staff writer

HANSON The 21-year-old college student who disappeared after a minor car crash in New Hampshire last week probably left the area in another vehicle, investigators said Thursday after a search near the crash scene failed to produce evidence she had walked into the woods.

Police say they have considered that someone whom Maura Murray knew was traveling with her in another vehicle, but that remains unknown. She is a junior at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.

Meanwhile, the investigation into the Feb. 9 disappearance widened Thursday when the FBI joined the probe at the request of New Hampshire State Police. FBI agents spent Thursday morning interviewing Murray's mother, Lauri Murray, at her Hanson home.

"They want to talk to everybody that knows her, any clue," said a distraught Lauri Murray. "We're pushing, now, two weeks and there's not a word or a sign of this girl."

Maura Murray excelled in academics and sports at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, went on to the West Point military academy and left after a year and a half to pursue a nursing degree at UMass, where she was on the dean's list.

"She's a very academically talented, gifted student," said Jim Daley, Whitman-Hanson basketball coach and social-studies coordinator. "She's very organized, very diligent. She was a steady-eddy, very consistent, very focused, a lovely young girl.

"It's more than sad, it's tragic," added Daley, a Hanson resident who is hopeful Murray will let people know she is safe.

"She definitely was very responsible," said her boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch, a West Point graduate who has been in New Hampshire since last week with his parents and Murray's family.

From a small motel over the Vermont border, the families have been searching the area, keeping in touch with investigators and talking to the media.

Rausch said he cannot explain Murray's disappearance in the rural area where she has climbed mountains and vacationed with her family.

Her father, Fred, of South Weymouth, and older brother, Freddy, also searched the woods along Route 112 in the past week and have not found any footsteps to indicate she had been there, Rausch said.

The family has established a Web site with photographs of Murray, hoping someone will recognize her.

"She has that intense radiant smile in every photo," Rausch said. "She's such a radiant, happy girl that you just can't help falling in love with her."

He said his parents, who drove from Ohio to join the search, feel the same way.

Rausch said Murray was excited about the challenges she faced in a new semester at school after they spent the holidays together. Her desire to follow her parents into the medical field prompted her transfer from West Point to UMass, he said.

Although they are separated because of his military assignment in the South, Rausch said he and Murray spoke regularly, sharing a cell phone account.

"We talked about marriage quite a bit, when we were going to be engaged," Rausch said.

He said he received a voice mail from Murray on the afternoon of Feb. 9.

"Regardless of why she went up here, I'm certain that she wanted me to know," he said in a telephone interview from the Vermont motel. "She told me she missed me, she loved me."

She also asked him to call her or, if she did not hear from him, she would call him again, he said. The call never came.

Now, Rausch and Murray's family call her cell phone many times each day, but she does not answer. The calls go to voice mail. They also access the voicemail, but he said, there are no messages related to her disappearance or her whereabouts.

New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza said investigators are as frustrated as Murray's family and friends. He hopes the FBI will uncover some information to shed some light on her disappearance while New Hampshire state and local police continue their probe.

"We're trying to learn as much as we can about what Maura was thinking, who she may have for friends or why she may have headed north," Scarinza said Thursday.

He was in the area Thursday for the ground and air search of the area along Route 112 where Murray was briefly seen after crashing her vehicle and urging a witness not to contact police.

There are several houses along that stretch of the otherwise lonely road that Murray could have gone to for help, Scarinza said.

If she entered a vehicle to get away from the scene, as police believe, they wonder if she knew the driver or if she went with a stranger.

There is also new information indicating that Murray may have intended to leave school for longer than a week.

"Clearly, her intention was to leave school for, at this point, a destination unknown," Scarinza said. "Why she went through Haverhill is unknown."

Many of her belongings had been packed and left behind in her dorm room at the school, Scarinza said after talking to campus police.

The school newspaper, The Daily Collegian, also quoted a classmate who said Murray's room was packed like she was planning to move out.

Murray was believed to have a single room in the dorm, school spokesman Patrick J. Murray said.

She was also quiet and did not socialize with other students, according to a report published in the school newspaper.

On the day she disappeared, Murray e-mailed the art gallery where she worked and her teachers to say she would be gone for a week to attend to a family emergency, Scarinza said.

Although there have been reports that Murray may have been suicidal, that she had a family problem during the weekend before she disappeared, those close to the young woman said she was upbeat and did not have a history of depression.

She had crashed her father's car in Amherst on the Saturday night before she disappeared, but Rausch said it was nothing serious, that she skidded on ice. Police, however, said it was a significant accident.

A witness at the New Hampshire crash site said she appeared to be impaired by alcohol. Police have not provided information to support that, but Lauri Murray said she believes there was some wine in her daughter's car, though she is unsure if it was open or broke when the two airbags deployed in the crash.

That is not an issue, Lauri Murray said, as she tries to cope. Her son Curtis, 15, remains with her at the family home after spending several days searching the New Hampshire woods last week.

Police have scaled back the ground search after making a third and larger sweep through the area Thursday, Scarinza said.

"That's not the case for the rest of the investigation," he said.

The search for Maura Murray will continue in New Hampshire and in Massachusetts, both on an official and personal basis.

"If Maura is not contacting us because she's unable to, we most certainly don't want her to give up," Rausch said. "We won't give up. Our mission right now is to find her."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 26
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:06:30 pm
New Hampshire Union Leader

February 20, 2004

Ground search ends for Bay State woman

By Lorna Colquhoun

HAVERHILL -- A second search of a rural part of Swiftwater for a woman who vanished from there after a car accident 10 days ago will be the last one, at least for now.

State police, Fish and Game conservation officers, three search dogs and a helicopter fanned out across a two-square-mile area along the Wild Ammonoosuc River and Route 112 yesterday in search of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass.

But, officials said, the woods gave no clues as to what happened to the woman, who was last seen Feb. 9 at about 7 p.m., after she had a minor car accident in the area of the Weathered Barn on Route 112.

"Ground teams checked trails and roadways . . . there are no conclusive clues to continue," said Fish and Game Lt. Todd Bogardus at a news conference yesterday.

It was disappointing news for the family of Murray, who have vigorously searched throughout the area for the past 10 days, traveling as far as Conway and Bartlett to put up posters asking for information about the woman, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

"She loved her family and friends, and there is no way she would put the two most important people in her life -- her father and my son -- through this nightmare," said Sharon Rausch, the mother of Murray's boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch.

Her son must report back for duty in Oklahoma tomorrow, she said, and other family members who have put their lives on hold must also return to their homes. But, she said, that does not mean they are giving up trying to find her.

"There are countless friends clamoring to help," Rausch said.

Authorities are not going to stop trying to locate Murray, either, said State Police Lt. John Scarinza.

"We understand the family's frustration in not being able to find Maura," he said. "At this point, we do not see anything on a search on the ground, but it does not mean we are not searching for her. It's more appropriate now to look elsewhere and gather information."

New Hampshire investigators, which include the Haverhill police department, state police and Fish and Game, also have been working with Massachusetts law enforcement, including the UMass campus police. The FBI also has been providing assistance in Massachusetts in developing a timeline of Murray's actions in the week before her disappearance.

But the case is puzzling. Murray had e-mailed her professors telling them she would be out of classes for a week, while she tended to some family business. Rausch said Murray was in contact with her son during the day on Monday, leaving him a telephone message that said, "I love you, call me," she said.

Murray, who had spent many family vacations visiting and hiking in the White Mountains, also had packed a suitcase.

She had a minor car accident on Route 112 that night. Witnesses said she asked them to call a wrecker, but not the police. Police were called and an officer was on the scene in less than 10 minutes after the emergency call, Scarinza said.

In that time, however, Murray vanished.

"How or why is unknown at this point," Scarinza said. "We are reasonably confident that she did not enter the woods near the accident scene -- that area was searched several times."

While Haverhill police conducted a search of the area when they responded to the accident scene, nothing was found. Scarinza said it was Tuesday before the police were able to determine and contact Murray's father, the owner of the car, who then discovered that his daughter was missing.

A search of the area began that Wednesday, but nothing was found. Because there has been no snow or other weather to radically change the landscape, the second search went over the same terrain yesterday.

The accident scene was in sight of several homes, although the area becomes remote after that. Scarinza said she did not seek help from any of the homeowners, so it may be that she accepted a ride somewhere, but, he said, "there is no indication that anyone picked her up."

There is no evidence of foul play, either, he said.

"There is absolutely no indication that any harm has come to her," he said.

After more than a week of heartbreaking days, Rausch said the family can only conclude that Murray is unable to contact them.

"It's been a very long 10 days, and we are very worried," she said. "We are all convinced in our hearts that she is somewhere and someone is preventing her from contacting us."

Scarinza said that despite the posters seeking information and media coverage of Murray's disappearance, there has been little public response. He would not say if any of her accounts have been active since the disappearance.

Rausch and her husband must return to their Ohio home on Monday, but she said their efforts would continue to find Murray.

"Maura, we love you," she said. "We are never going to give up hope and don't you give up hope. We'll bring you home."

Anyone with information can contact the Haverhill police department at 747-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 27
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:08:52 pm
Boston Globe

February 20, 2004

With no new leads, FBI joins search for missing student

By Peter DeMarco

The FBI has joined in the search for missing college student Maura Murray, but without a single lead in the nearly two-week old case, New Hampshire authorities said the additional investigators might not make a difference.

Murray, a 21-year-old Hanson native and nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, vanished the night of Feb. 9 after crashing her car into a snowbank on a rural road in Woodsville, N.H.

Police in helicopters and with their dogs searched the area for a second time yesterday, but with no evidence that Murray fled into the woods, her family and authorities believe she either hitched a ride and is on her own, or was abducted.

Missing persons cases are typically handled by local and state authorities unless a federal crime has been committed.

So far, investigators have found no evidence that Murray was kidnapped or taken across state lines.

Nevertheless, at the urging of Murray's father, Fred, New Hampshire State Police are now working with Boston-based FBI agents on the case, officials said.

Though police have questioned many of Murray's family members and friends, FBI agents will probably return to UMass-Amherst and Hanson for further interviews and background checks, said Lieutenant John Scarinza, commander of State Police Troop F.

"We're now at the phase where we need to learn more about the week before Maura headed north," he said. "If any friends or associates or classmates had any discussions with her about her wanting to come up north, or places she'd like to visit, or important destinations, we'd like to hear from them. Maybe that would help us understand where she went, or why."

Hours before she departed for New Hampshire on Feb. 9, Murray e-mailed a professor and her part-time campus job to say she was heading home for the week because of a death in the family, according to school officials and the Massachusetts Daily Collegian, a student newspaper.

Withdrawing $280 from an ATM, she loaded her Saturn with clothing, a book, and a stuffed toy monkey and headed to New Hampshire, where she had frequently hiked with her father. She told no one of her plans.

About 7 that evening, she lost control on a sharp bend on Route 112 in Woodsville. Unhurt, but appearing to be intoxicated, she refused help from a motorist who offered assistance and was gone when police reached her car about 10 minutes later, officials said.

Fearing that Murray may have been taken across state lines and unaware of any major issue she might have been struggling with, her family urged the FBI to get involved.

Woodsville is about 5 miles from the Vermont border and about a two-hour drive from New York, Maine, and Canada.

Fred Murray, who is scheduled to appear on ABC-TV's "Good Morning America" today to discuss his daughter's disappearance, said the FBI involvement is a good start, but not enough.

"They're saying the FBI is in, but that's a very limited scale," he said. "I'd like to see the best case scenario -- agents crawling all over the place up here."

Scarinza said investigators, including detectives at UMass-Amherst, share Murray's concerns. At the same time, he cautioned that people sometimes escape to the White Mountains without telling their family or friends.

"She's an adult. If you want to go on vacation for a few weeks, you have a right to do that. But even the FBI is not going to go to California to see if she's on vacation there," he said.

"Hopefully, by the close of [today] we will have talked to everyone at least twice within a reasonable radius of the area. We're talking 5 miles, give or take," he continued. "There's no evidence of a struggle near or around the car. No witness says there was an altercation. No evidence that any criminal offense has happened to her. Yes, she's missing. It's frustrating for the family. And law enforcement officials are frustrated too. We have no idea where she is."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 28
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:11:14 pm
The Caledonian-Record

February 20, 2004

Area Man Laments The Events Of Feb. 9 - Missing Woman Didn't Accept His Help

By Gary E. Lindsley

Butch Atwood wishes the events of the night of Feb. 9 had gone much differently for a missing 21-year-old Massachusetts woman.

Atwood was on his way home, about a mile from Swiftwater on Route 112 in Haverhill, when rounding the sharp left-hand curve by The Weathered Barn, he saw a black Saturn partially in the roadway and partially mired in the snow. It was about 7:30 p.m., he said.

The driver had failed to negotiate the sharp curve after passing the barn, gone off the road and struck a stand of trees on the right side of the highway. The car sustained extensive front-end damage.

Atwood, a school bus driver for First Student, was returning from dropping off students after a day of skiing at Wildcat Mountain.

He stopped the school bus by the Saturn to see if he could help. "She was still in the car," Atwood said, referring to Maura Murray.

Murray, who is from Hanson, Mass., and is a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has been missing since the night of the accident.

Atwood said the Saturn's lights weren't on. "I shined the light in (her car)," he said. "I said, Are you OK?' She said she was."

Atwood said he got a good look at her. She looked to be about 20 and had dark hair.

As a matter of safety, he told her to turn her car's lights on so no one would strike her vehicle coming around the curve.

"I saw no blood," he said. "She was cold and she was shivering. I told her I was going to call the police."

Murray, according to Atwood, told him not to because she had already called AAA.

"I said, OK. I will make a call to the police department and the fire department to check you out,'" he said. "I said, Why don't you come to my house? You can get warm and wait for the police and EMS.'" Atwood said she just told him to go.

He drove to his house, about 75 yards from the scene of the accident, and backed it his driveway before running into the house to call police.

However, he couldn't get through to the Haverhill Police Department and the Grafton County Sheriff's Department.

He called 911 and the operator couldn't either. Atwood said another 911 operator was able to get through.

While he was talking on his phone on his front porch, Atwood could see the road, but not Murray's disabled car. He saw several vehicles drive by, but couldn't tell any makes or models because it was so dark.

After about seven to nine minutes, he looked out and saw the Haverhill Police. Atwood believed the situation was under control and went to the school bus to tend to his paperwork.

The next thing he knew, Haverhill Police Department Sgt. Cecil Smith was banging on his bus window. Smith asked him if he had called in the accident and seen anyone at the scene. Atwood told Smith he had seen a girl about 20 with dark hair.

Smith said when he arrived, Murray was no longer with her car. In the seven to nine minutes between the time Atwood had left Murray to call for help and the time Smith arrived, Murray had vanished.

"I took a ride around the back roads," Atwood said. "I was gone about 15 minutes. Then I took a ride to French Pond."

He even drove about a mile down the road to the store in Swiftwater to check and see if she was there. She wasn't.

When he returned to the accident scene, a New Hampshire State Police trooper was there.

Atwood said they checked the woods in the immediate area to see if Murray had gone into the forest. There weren't any tracks.

He said there wasn't any way Murray could have driven the car after the accident. He said the radiator had been pushed back into the fan. The air bag also had been deployed.

However, he said it didn't appear Murray had been injured, just shaken up.

"I just wish I could have gotten her to come with me," he lamented. "But I am a big man, over 350 pounds. She may have gotten into a car with someone who was clean cut."

Atwood believes one of the vehicles which had passed his house could have stopped and picked her up. "She could be anywhere, absolutely," Atwood said.

He said whoever may have picked her up could have driven toward the area of Lincoln, or back to Route 302 and over to Vermont.

Anyone who has seen Murray is asked to contact the New Hampshire State Police at 603-846-3333 or 603-271-1170. People also can call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 29
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:13:36 pm
The Caledonian-Record

February 20, 2004

Air, Ground Search Futile - FBI Called Into Case

By Gary E. Lindsley

Nancy Lyon and her canine partner, a 3-year-old malinois, Quicklie, spent most of Thursday morning scouring a section of Route 112 for a missing 21-year-old Hanson, Mass., woman.

Lyon and Quiklie are members of the New England K-9 Search and Rescue group. They were one of three canine teams taking part in the search for Maura Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

They were unable to turn up any sign of the missing college student.

A ground and air search coordinated by New Hampshire Fish and Game failed to turn up any clues in Murray's disappearance Thursday.

Murray unexpectedly left her college and her job at an art gallery Feb. 9 and headed to New Hampshire in her black 1996 Saturn.

She was traveling on Route 112 around 7 p.m. in Haverhill when she failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve past The Weathered Barn and crashed into a stand of trees on the right side of the highway.

The front end of the car suffered extensive damage upon impact. The car's radiator was pushed back into the fan, making the vehicle inoperable.

Fish and Game Lt. Todd Bogardus, in a press conference at the Haverhill Police Department Thursday afternoon, said the three canine teams, two of which were part of the New England K-9 Search and Rescue group, and the other from the state police, were unable to come up with any clues. Two of the canines were air scent dogs.

"The results today were non-conclusive," Bogardus said. "We were unable to locate anything within a 2-mile square radius."

Between the air and ground searches, he said there weren't any conclusive clues to enable a continuation of the search.

"Tracks are prevalent out there, but none connected with Maura," he said. "So, now our ground search is suspended."

Lt. John Scarinza of New Hampshire State Police Troop F said police know Murray had e-mailed her employer she was taking a week off for a family emergency.

"How and why she ended up in Haverhill is unknown," he said.

However, Maura's father, Fred Murray, has said the family used to camp in the area and Maura was familiar with New Hampshire.

"We are reasonably confident she did not enter the woods near the crash scene," Scarinza said.

He also said police don't have any indication any harm has come to her.

"There is no indication someone picked her up," Scarinza said. "At this point, I have no reason to believe that (she was taken against her will)."

The FBI, he said, is now involved with the case and is conducting a background investigation in Massachusetts.

"We have not asked them to do that," Scarinza said, referring to checking her computer for any information which would help move the investigation along. "We have been working with the University of Massachusetts police at Amherst. They have been a tremendous help."

Police have checked bus companies and questioned bus drivers to see if Murray had caught a bus somewhere. Nothing has proven that was the case.

Authorities are also conducting background checks of "people of interest" in the area.

When asked why a second ground and air search was conducted Thursday, nearly a week and a half after the accident, Scarinza said, "We wanted to make sure we had done everything twice. We have a very good feeling we have done everything we can do at the crash site."

Police in the meantime have been tracking Murray's credit cards and bank accounts. But they aren't revealing anything they have learned.

Sharon Rausch, the mother of Bill Rausch, who is Murray's fiance-to-be and a second lieutenant with C Battery, 119th Field Artillery at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla., was present at the press conference.

"It's been a long, long 10 days," Rausch said. "We are very worried. We believe she is somewhere and someone is preventing her from contacting us.

"She loved her family and there is no way she would put her father and my son through this."

Rausch, who is from Marengo, Ohio, wanted to send a message to Murray.

"Maura, we love you," she said. "Don't you give up. We will never give up. We will find you."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 30
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:15:58 pm
WCAX

February 20, 2004

Search For Missing Woman Leads To Burlington

UMass Student Last Seen In Woodville, N.H.

Police are expanding their search for a missing woman to the Champlain Valley.

New Hampshire State Police say that before Maura Murray, 21, disappeared a week and a half ago, the missing University of Massachusetts student had been on her computer looking up directions to Burlington.

Murray was last seen in Woodsville, where she was involved in a minor car accident.

Thursday afternoon police scoured the area, as Murray's family kept their fingers crossed that they would come up empty.

"I hope they don't find anything," said Fred Murray, Maura's father. "I want them there, but I hope they're unsuccessful. I appreciate their efforts."

The search turned up nothing, and has been put on hold while investigators look into the map of Burlington found on Murray's computer.

Police say Murray also withdrew $300 from an ATM, and emailed professors saying she had to take a week off to deal with a family problem.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 31
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:18:20 pm
Boston Globe

February 21, 2004

Map clue spurs search for student in Vermont

By Peter DeMarco

Police are searching the Burlington, Vt., area for missing college student Maura Murray after a review of her personal computer revealed she used the Internet on the day she disappeared to obtain driving directions there.

Fred Murray, the missing woman's father, said University of Massachusetts at Amherst campus police discovered yesterday that the junior nursing student had used Mapquest.com to research directions to Burlington on Feb. 9. Hours later, she crashed her car into a snowbank in Woodsville, N.H., and vanished without a trace.

Murray's father said he also discovered a note card that mentioned Burlington among many personal belongings she had packed in her car. The two last visited the northern Vermont city on Columbus Day weekend, when they hiked nearby Camel's Hump Mountain and Mount Mansfield.

New Hampshire State Police -- who are investigating Murray's disappearance, along with Haverhill, N.H., police and the FBI -- notified authorities in Vermont yesterday to be on the lookout for the slender, 5-foot-7 Hanson, Mass., woman, who was last seen nearly two weeks ago.

"We mentioned to all the officers at roll call to be on the lookout for her," said Lieutenant Scott Davidson of the Burlington police. "We have her picture. The South Burlington police are looking for her, too."

New Hampshire State Police Lieutenant John Scarinza said yesterday that for several days police have been checking motels and hotels in several Vermont communities. Investigators know of no one Murray might know in the Burlington area, he said.

"Vermont State Police, Burlington police, and other local agencies have canvassed motels in Burlington, South Burlington, Colchester, Shelburne, and surrounding towns to see if she checked in anywhere around," he said.

Authorities used helicopters and dogs to search the area where Murray crashed last week and again on Thursday, but have found no indication that she fled into nearby woods or evidence of foul play. Nevertheless, her family and friends say they believe she was kidnapped.

What is clear is that Murray, a conscientious nursing student and former West Point cadet, was deeply troubled by something in the days preceding her disappearance.

On Thursday, Feb. 5, Murray was working at her campus job at a security desk in a UMass-Amherst dormitory when she received a phone call that made her cry, said her father and a high school friend, Andrea Connolly. She was so disturbed by the call that her supervisor had to escort her home.

Two days later, she damaged her father's car in a minor accident. Distraught over her fender-bender, she called her boyfriend, Army Lieutenant Bill Rausch, in tears the next day.

About 24 hours later, on Feb. 9, she lied to a professor and the campus art gallery where she worked, informing them through e-mails that she needed to return to her hometown of Hanson because of a death in the family, officials and family members said.

Murray then withdrew $280 from an ATM, packed all her belongings as if she were moving out, and took off with some of them in her Saturn.

A witness who offered Murray help after she crashed her car told police she appeared to be intoxicated, officials said. An open bottle of alcohol was found in the car, Rausch said.

By the time Haverhill police arrived at the accident scene, Murray, who had asked the witness not to call authorities, was gone.

Fred Murray said he had planned to talk to his daughter that night about filling out a police report in the earlier accident. In her car was a blank accident form from the Amherst police.

"I'm convinced she was going to call me Monday night and was going to make out the form," he said. "If she wasn't going to do it, why go to the Amherst police and get the form? That makes me think she was unable to make the call. That's why I think she's been physically harmed and is in danger."

New Hampshire officials, respectful of her family's concerns, caution that Murray may have simply gone away for a few days without informing anyone.

"I totally appreciate the family's frustration in not knowing where she is or what has happened," Scarinza said. "But it's also true that she was apparently leaving Massachusetts without telling her family or friends or her boyfriend. That indicates to me that perhaps she wanted to get away on her own."

Murray's family has offered a reward for information and has created a website, www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 32
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:20:42 pm
The Patriot Ledger

February 21, 2004

‘I want to talk to the last one to see her': Missing student's mother heads to N.H. to join search

By Joe McGee

HANSON - The mother of missing college student Maura Murray of Hanson was planning to travel to New Hampshire this weekend to question witnesses in Haverhill, where her daughter disappeared Feb. 9.

‘‘I want to talk to people on my own, face to face. It's my mother's intuition,'' Lauri Murray said Friday.

Authorities Friday expanded their search into western Vermont after learning Murray looked up directions to the Burlington area before disappearing.

Though police said they are not sure where the Vermont lead may take them, they are exploring all avenues in what has become a stagnant investigation. Police were unaware of anyone Maura knew in Vermont.

Vermont State Police and Burlington police were canvassing motels in Burlington, South Burlington, Colchester and Shelburne, hoping to find clues.

Murray was last seen on Wild Ammonoosuc Road on Route 112 in Haverhill, where she crashed her car into a snowbank.

It was thought she may have wandered into nearby woods, but search and rescue efforts were officially called off Friday.

New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza said police now believe Murray got a ride from the accident scene. There was no evidence, however, to suggest there was a struggle.

‘‘From that point on, it's destination unknown,'' Scarinza said.

Nobody is able to determine why Murray, a junior at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was in New Hampshire.

She left campus with some money, and had sent an E-mail saying she would be away to take care of unspecified family business.

Police said they found evidence that Murray was drinking inside her car. A witness said she appeared drunk, refused help and left the scene on her own.

But none of those clues make sense to those who know Murray. They said she is an overachieving student and athlete, and had no personal problems to the best of anyone's knowledge.

Lauri Murray has not left her home since Feb. 9. She said her emotions have changed from feeling sad and depressed, to the point that she is angry and wants to investigate her daughter's disappearance on her own.

‘‘I want to talk to the last one to see her. All the information we got was that she was walking up that road and just disappeared. Nobody just disappears like that, and as far as being picked up or that she ran away, I'm getting angry. She would not do this and she would've contacted someone. We're pushing 10 days now and somebody out there knows something,'' she said.

Lauri Murray said Pat Wilson and Lee Meehan, two of her co-workers at Samuel Marcus Nursing & Retirement Home in Weymouth, are arranging to take time off to drive her to New Hampshire. Murray is recovering from a broken ankle.

Lauri Murray's daughter Julie, an Army officer at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, is taking emergency leave and is expected to arrive on Sunday to help in the search.

Leave is up for Maura Murray's boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch of Oklahoma, who is heading back to his military post. Maura Murray's father Frederick and her brothers and sisters are still handing out fliers in Vermont and New Hampshire.

Lauri Murray said she plans on doing all she can to help find her daughter.

‘‘I can't sit here and just be in the dark. I know everybody is doing the best they can but I need to be up there,'' she said.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com
Title: Newspaper Articles # 33
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:24:19 pm
New Hampshire Union Leader

February 21, 2004

Search for missing Mass. woman expands to Vt.

By David Tirrell-Wysocki

Authorities expanded their search for a missing Massachusetts woman to western Vermont this week after learning she looked up directions to the Burlington area before disappearing in New Hampshire last week.

Officials know of no one Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., might know in the Burlington area, New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza said. He said for several days police have been checking motels and hotels in several Vermont communities, with no luck.

"Vermont State Police, Burlington police and other local agencies have canvassed motels in Burlington, South Burlington, Colchester, Shelburne and surrounding towns to see if she checked in anywhere around," he said.

Murray was last seen after a minor accident in northern New Hampshire on Feb. 9.

Searches, including a renewed search Thursday with dogs and a helicopter, turned up no sign that the woman wandered into the snow-covered woods.

Scarinza said police believe Murray got a ride from the accident scene.

"From that point on, it's destination unknown," he said.

Family members believe she would contact them if she could, so they believe she either is being held against her will or has been harmed.

But Scarinza said searchers found no sign of a struggle at the scene or any other evidence that she has been harmed.

"I totally appreciate the family's frustration in not knowing where she is or what has happened," he said. "But it's also true that she was apparently leaving Massachusetts without telling her family or friends or her boyfriend."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 34
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:27:04 pm
The Caledonian-Record

February 21, 2004

Search For Missing Woman Extended To Vermont Nothing Turned Up

By Gary E. Lindsley

The search for a missing 21-year-old Massachusetts woman has shifted in a different direction, at least for the moment.

New Hampshire State Police Troop F Commander Lt. John Scarinza said a search of Maura Murray's computer in her dorm room at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst revealed the missing woman had searched for directions to Burlington, Vt.

Law enforcement authorities, as well as family members and friends, scoured the Burlington, Shelburne, East Burlington and Colchester areas Friday, a day after New Hampshire State Police and New Hampshire Fish and Game suspended a one-day air and ground search in the Haverhill, N.H. area.

Murray, who is a nursing student at UMass at Amherst, left the university Feb. 9 and headed toward New Hampshire in a black 1996 Saturn.

About a mile east of Swiftwater on Route 112, Murray failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve and her Saturn went off the right side of the highway, striking a strand of trees.

Butch Atwood, who lives just up the road from the site, offered her help. She refused. However, he went to his house to call police and EMS.

When Haverhill police arrived about seven to nine minutes later, Murray was no where to be found.

Scarinza said police detectives with the UMass campus police department searched Murray's computer and learned she had used the Mapquest Web site to search for directions to Burlington, the day before she had her accident in Haverhill.

"We have contacted Vermont State Police and Burlington police," he said. "They have canvassed all of the hotels. She also had looked at hotel (Web) sites."

Scarinza said color photos of Murray have been distributed in the Burlington area, as well as in Colchester, Shelburne and East Burlington.

"No one has seen her," he said.

Scarinza speculated Murray had searched for directions to Burlington because she and her father, Fred, had been to the area and had hiked Mt. Mansfield and Camel's Hump.

Murray said he and his daughter had hiked Mt. Mansfield and Camel's Hump on Columbus Day weekend and had had a great time.

"She loved it," he said. "Especially the area downtown where you can walk."

The search in Vermont comes a day after police conducted and suspended a combined air and ground search for Murray, the second such search since she disappeared Feb. 9.

Although three dog search teams did not come up with any hits Thursday, a canine team did hit on Murray's scent when a search was conducted Feb. 11.

Scarinza said a canine tracked Murray for about 100 yards east of where Murray's car went off the road.

He said the trail ended in the general area of Atwood's residence.

Because the trail came to an end, Scarinza believes it is an indication she left the area in a car.

"It's very frustrating," he said, referring to the lack of any information coming in about where Murray can be.

Scarinza said UMass campus police have been interviewing people, including professors and students, since Murray left the university for unknown reasons. She'd e-mailed her professors telling them she would be away for a week because of a family emergency.

"It has become pretty clear, she hasn't told anyone she was leaving," he said. "In reality, she had planned to go (to Burlington)."

However, Murray was headed in an entirely different direction, toward Lincoln, N.H., when she had her crash. She was familiar with the New Hampshire White Mountains as well.

Anyone who has seen Murray is asked to contact the New Hampshire State Police at 603-846-3333 or 603-271-1170. People also can call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 35
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:29:26 pm
The Caledonian-Record

February 21, 2004

Family, Friends Not Giving Up Efforts

Seeking Outside Help

By Gary E. Lindsley

Family and friends of Maura Murray have been in the area of the crash site conducting massive foot searches for Maura Murray since Feb. 11.

Friday, their attention turned to Vermont where they distributed more fliers to hotels and police agencies in Burlington.

Sharon Rausch and her husband, Bill, have been helping Fred Murray search for his daughter since Feb. 11.

So has the Rausch's son, Billie, who is Murray's fiance-to-be and a second lieutenant with C Battery, 119th Field Artillery at Fort Sill, Lawton, Okla.

They have been going non-stop in their search for Murray, including walking trails and roads, distributing fliers and knocking on doors in the area of the accident.

Family members and friends are at times upset about the lack of information or difference in information obtained by police investigators and what they have been able to glean from knocking on doors and asking questions.

Last week, they were told by investigators it was believed Murray had headed toward the Rausch's home in Marengo, Ohio, because she was having family trouble.

Sharon Rausch said although she didn't believe that, she had one of her children, who had stayed behind, put notes on the door for Murray and left the home unlocked.

However, Murray has not turned up in Ohio. Nor have signs of her surfaced in Vermont. And the only hint of a sign of her in New Hampshire was Feb. 11 when a canine tracked her scent from her car to about 100 yards east of the accident site, in the area of the Butch Atwood residence.

The 5-feet, 7-inch-tall brunette, who weighs about 120 pounds and has blue eyes, reportedly e-mailed her employer she would be gone for a week and took about $280 from her checking account.

Family members have said it was not like Murray to just up and leave the campus without telling anyone.

Rausch said a dorm mate saw her leave the campus about 4 or 4:30 p.m. Feb 9. She said Murray's father and her son went through Maura's stuff again and found an index card with the Mapquest directions for Burlington, Vt.

Rausch said the Saturn was having mechanical problems, possibly only running on three cylinders, when Murray set out for Burlington. She said, possibly, because the car was running poorly, she decided to leave Interstate 91 and pick up Route 302 and head toward the Lincoln area.

And Rausch discounts any thoughts Murray would have just walked away from her family, boyfriend and friends because she loved them too much.

She and Fred Murray said Maura wouldn't have picked up insurance forms for her father to fill out if she had not planned to return home.

"I hope we can get more help...in Vermont," Murray's father said. "We need to look elsewhere. I will take all the help I can get from anywhere."

Family members and friends are hoping the FBI will take a more thorough and active role in the search for Murray since three states are involved.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 36
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:31:48 pm
Lowell Sun / The New Hampshire Union Leader / Foster's Sunday Citizen / Nashua Telegraph

Wednesday, February 22, 2004

Notes: The Nashua Telegraph ends where indicated below. Foster's Sunday Citizen has additional text in italics, below.

Dad of missing Mass. woman now suspects foul play

Father of missing woman frustrated with search

By Kate McCann

Associated Press Writer

CONCORD, N.H. — The father of a missing Massachusetts woman said he wants police to start treating the search like a criminal investigation.

Since 21-year-old Maura Murray vanished after a car accident in northern New Hampshire two weeks ago, police have repeatedly said they do not suspect foul play.

Searchers found no signs of struggle at the scene, and it appears Murray was planning a getaway. She lied to professors about a death in the family, and said she would be gone from class for the week and then packed her belongings as if she was moving out.

New Hampshire investigators have been working with Massachusetts law enforcement, including campus police at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, where Murray is a nursing student.

Police said it appears she was leaving Massachusetts without telling anyone and wanted to get away on her own, and she may not know about the search if she’s not in New England.

But her family is starting to suspect otherwise. Her father, Frederick Murray, believes his daughter was given a ride from a person who won’t come forward since he helped her leave the scene of an accident, or a person who gave her a ride and then abducted her.

“To take a break or start a new life, she would need money,” Murray said in a telephone interview. “She hasn’t used her ATM card, she hasn’t used her cell phone, she hasn’t spent a dime.”

Searches, including a renewed search Thursday with dogs and a helicopter in northern New Hampshire, turned up no sign that the woman wandered into the snow-covered woods.

Police called off the ground search in that area. Frederick Murray said he is afraid the search is slowly grinding to a halt.

“We should think of it in term s of a criminal investigation,” Murray said. “It sounds like it would be the key to expanding it. Let’s grab the bull by the horns and call it foul play.”

Vermont state police, Burlington police and other local agencies were combing area motels yesterday, after a check of Murray’s computer found she had looked up directions to Burlington the day she disappeared.

----------------------------------------------------------End Nashua Telegraph---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Police and family members are also trying to gauge the significance of a phone call that reduced Murray to tears while working her campus job at UMass-Amherst on Feb. 5. She was so disturbed by the call her supervisor had to take her home.

Police are also investigating a message on Maura’s phone from a friend she talked to the day before she disappeared.

Authorities said Murray withdrew $280 from an ATM on Feb. 9. Around 7 o’clock that evening she crashed her car into a snow bank several miles from the Vermont border.

A witness, who told police Murray appeared intoxicated but uninjured, called authorities against Murray’s wishes. By the time emergency workers arrived, Murray had gone, leaving most of her belongings in the car.

Maura’s father and his 33-year-old son were searching along the Kancamagus highway in northern New Hampshire on Saturday, where the family goes camping every summer.

"Time’s running out. Somebody must have seen something, somewhere," Fredrick Murray said. "One tip from anybody, you could be the person who saves this girl’s life." An award fund for any information about Murray is now more than $20,000.

Sharon Rausch, the mother of Maura’s boyfriend, said Duke University basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski has donated an undisclosed amount to the fund. Rausch said the coach met Maura at Madison Square Garden over the holidays. Krzyzewski’s daughter is friends with Maura and her boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 37
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:34:10 pm
Journal Opinion

February 25, 2004

(Not an article, but a copy of the missing person flier)

Page 18

MISSING

02/09/04

Maura Murray

Age: 21

height : 5' 7" weight 120lbs.

curley brown shoulder length hair

Last seen wearing jeans & dark coat

Click to see picture with flier

Contact Haverhill Police Dept.

603-787-2222
Title: Newspaper Articles # 38
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:36:32 pm
Boston Globe

February 27, 2004

Footprints in the snow

By Brian McGrory

Haverhill, N.H. -- They say the hardest thing that any parent can ever be called upon to do is bury their child.

But standing amid the glorious scenery of the White Mountains this week, where an uneven layer of snow coated the meadows like vanilla frosting on a homemade cake, I had to think there might be something even worse. And Fred Murray is living it right now.

Murray is from the South Shore. His daughter, Maura, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, vanished into the thin air of the northern New Hampshire wilderness this month. She had a minor car accident along a pitch black stretch of rural road on Feb. 9, and in the 10 minutes it took police to respond, she was gone.

Her cellphone hasn't been used since. Her credit cards haven't registered any purchases. She left most of her clothing in a suitcase in the back of the disabled car. And her father, her sister, her brothers, her friends have no idea what they're supposed to do now.

Immediately, they descended upon this hamlet en masse. They scrambled through the dense woods nearby. They drove a hundred miles in every direction, tacking fliers to telephone polls and bulletin boards of local stores. They stopped at bus stations in hopes that someone might have seen something. "I followed footsteps through the snow," Fred Murray said this week. When he saw a set of prints, he took off after them.

This much is known: At UMass, Maura received a call on the evening of Feb. 5 that reduced her to tears. A couple of days later, she told professors she'd be gone for a week for a family emergency. On Feb. 9, she left her boyfriend of three years, an army lieutenant in Oklahoma, an e-mail and voice mail in which she indicated nothing wrong, packed her car, and headed north.

The next time she was seen was in this tiny valley town, by Butch Atwood, a 58-year-old local school bus driver who passed her car as it sat in the snowbank. He said he stopped and asked if she needed help. She declined. He drove the 100 yards to his house and called the police. When they arrived, she was gone.

Authorities sent a heat-seeking helicopter along the treetops as recently as yesterday. They used dogs to try to trace her steps away from the accident scene. They dispatched cadaver-sniffing canines into the forest, all to no avail.

Eventually, life continues, bills need to be paid, and last weekend Fred Murray had to get back home. "The worst part was driving home alone," he said. "Then I stopped in her room at UMass, and that was pretty awful."

The two were uncommonly tight since she was a young girl. Both avid runners, they trained together. They hiked regularly in New Hampshire. "I was looking for some hint that she might have left for me, something that I'd understand that would say goodbye," he said of her room search. "But there wasn't anything."

"We weren't strangers; we were very close. I can't see her not saying goodbye to me. That's why I suspect foul play."

Her father acknowledges that she was fleeing school for reasons that he said are still unclear. He also believes that once she crashed, only two scenarios remain: She was picked up on the road by someone who wanted to help her or by someone who hurt her. If it was the former, they would have already come forward to let authorities know where she went.

Butch Atwood, the last witness to see her, has been questioned several times by police. Worried that he should have helped more, he told me outside his cabin this week, "I have some sleepless nights now."

If Maura Murray is alive and well, she ought to know that hearts are broken. She should know that no mistake is insurmountable. People forgive. Time and attention heal feelings and wounds.

These days, when Fred Murray's phone rings, he jumps. Minutes drag like hours. Shady psychics and gumshoes keep offering help. "I just want to get my little girl back," he said.

Hopefully, there's a happy ending. It's just tough to see it now.

Brian McGrory is a Globe columnist. He can be reached at mcgrory@globe.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 39
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:38:54 pm
The Caledonian-Record

February 27, 2004

Seeking Outside Help

Family, Friends of Maura Murray Upset With Investigation

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL, NEW HAMPSHIRE - Family and friends of 21-year-old Maura Murray believe someone picked up the University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student after she was involved in a one-car accident in Haverhill, N.H., Feb. 9.

They have hired an outside investigator to find out what happened to her.

It has been more than 2-1/2 weeks since Murray's car failed to negotiate a sharp curve near The Weathered Barn on Route 112 and crashed into a stand of trees about one mile east of Swiftwater.

"With all the attention from the media, if a good person had picked her up, he would have come forward," said Sharon Rausch, mother of Bill Rausch, Murray's boyfriend. "It leads us to believe a bad guy picked her up."

"I just wish they would treat this as a criminal investigation. If they treated it as such, the FBI could become more involved."

The "they" she is referring to is New Hampshire State Police Troop F and the Haverhill Police Department.

Rausch said her son Bill, Murray's father, Fred, and Murray's siblings, Freddy, Kathleen and Julie, are all frustrated with the lack of leads and the apparent belief by law officials that Murray's disappearance is nothing more than a person not wanting anyone to know where she is.

They believe Murray would have fought anyone trying to abduct her.

Family members and friends are also frustrated with conflicting information in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

Murray, who is 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighs about 120 pounds and has brown hair and blue eyes, was last seen on the UMass campus between 4 and 4:30 p.m. Feb. 9.

Packed Up Her Dorm Room

UMass Police Department Detective Brian Davies said Murray had packed up all her belongings in her dorm room and appeared to be moving out and not returning.

Murray also had notified her professors she was going to be gone for a week because of a family emergency.

A search of Murray's computer by UMass detectives turned up evidence she had conducted a Mapquest search on the Internet for directions to Burlington, Vt.

Murray may had been having trouble with her black 1996 Saturn.

Rausch said she understood the vehicle was not running on all of its cylinders. Believing that, Murray may have left Interstate 91 and exited onto Route 302. She then picked up Route 112 and was headed east when her accident occurred.

She reportedly is familiar with the White Mountains region because of family camping trips.

Accident Scene

After Murray's accident, Butch Atwood said he was returning from taking students skiing when he spotted Murray's car half in the road and half off the road without its flashers on at about 7:30 p.m.

Others near the scene said the car's emergency flashers were on.

Atwood, who drives a First Student school bus, stopped his school bus by the Saturn to see if he could help. Murray was still in her car.

Atwood said she looked to be about 20 and had dark hair.

"I saw no blood," he said. "She was cold and she was shivering. I told her I was going to call the police."

Murray, according to Atwood, told him not to because she had already called AAA.

Atwood said he invited the woman to wait at his house, nearby, but she declined. He said he then went home to call 911.

After about seven to nine minutes, he looked out and saw a Haverhill police cruiser by the Saturn. A short time later, Haverhill Police Department officer, Sgt. Cecil Smith, notified Atwood that when he arrived at the crash scene, Murray was no longer with her car. Between the time Atwood had left Murray and her vehicle to call for help and the time Smith arrived, Murray had vanished.

State police arrived and checked the woods in the immediate area to see if Murray had gone into the forest. There weren't any tracks.

Atwood said Murray didn't appear to be intoxicated, despite police having said a witness indicated she had appeared to be impaired due to alcohol.

He lamented the fact Murray had not accepted his offer for help. He noted school bus drivers have to go through extensive background checks.

Police Delay Search And Press Release

Family members and friends are upset because police did not issue a press release seeking people's help in locating Murray until two days after the accident.

They also are upset because a thorough search of the area wasn't conducted until two days after the accident.

On Feb. 11, a canine team tracked Murray from the crash site east for about 100 yards.

Troop F Commander Lt. John Scarinza this week said investigators are still treating Murray's disappearance as a missing person investigation.

Scarinza says there is absolutely no evidence foul play has been involved, and that people living in the area of the accident scene have been interviewed several times.

A search of nearby homes by a canine team as well as forensics experts would require a search warrant. And a search warrant would require probable cause.

Rausch said family members were told by at least one person living near the accident site a man was seen in Maura's car after the accident.

Scarinza said investigators are using all the tools they have available to them to locate Murray.

Rausch said despite the appearance of Murray's dorm room, she and family members don't believe that's the case.

She said Murray, on the day of the accident, had picked up insurance forms related to an accident she'd had on Feb. 7. Murray was going to call her father the night of Feb. 9 to have him help her fill out the insurance forms.

Those forms, according to Rausch, were found in Murray's car along with school books, clothing and expensive jewelry.

The insurance forms and school books indicated to Rausch that Murray was going to return to Massachusetts and the university and was planning to study while she was away.

Family members and friends also are upset with no information coming from someone who placed a calling card call to Bill Rausch's cell phone as he was waiting to fly out of Oklahoma Feb. 11 to come search for his girlfriend.

Calling Card Call

Bill Rausch said he heard what he believed to be whimpering and crying.

However, Scarinza said that angle has been eliminated because investigators traced the calling card to the American Red Cross officials who had been attempting to contact Bill Rausch.

There also is the mysterious phone call Murray received while working as a security person at a residence hall at the UMass Amherst campus Feb. 5.

The call reportedly reduced Murray to tears and her supervisor had to take her home because she was so distraught.

UMass Detective Davies said his department has been able to track the phone call.

"We know the location," Davies said. "We have not been able to identify to whom she was speaking. Her friends have no idea who called her."

Sharon Rausch said, "It's obvious to us something has happened to distress her."

She said Murray had called Bill Feb. 8 and was crying because of the previous Saturday accident, though he didn't feel that was it.

"He told her on a scale of 1 to 10, it was only a 3 or 4," she said. "He had to talk to her a long time to calm her down. We are convinced something happened at school and her Amherst friends know."

Rausch speculated that what happened at the college has nothing to do with what happened to Murray after the accident on Route 112 in New Hampshire.

Because family and friends have been frustrated with the way the investigation has been carried out, they have brought in a private investigator to help them find Murray.

R.C. Stevens of PSII Inc., a Northampton, Mass., private investigation agency, is digging into what has happened.

A retired state trooper of 22 years, Stevens' firm handles high profile cases.

"Hopefully, we are going to do something soon," he said.

Murray's family and friends have started a pledge for reward fund. Rausch said donations aren't being accepted. However, pledges for a reward are, in the event information is provided which leads to Murray's return.

People can make pledges to the fund by sending an e-mail to mauramissing@hotmail.com.

Rausch said Duke University Blue Devils basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski and his family have pledged an unspecified amount of money to the reward fund.

Krzyzewski met Murray and Bill Rausch around Thanksgiving time and provided them with basketball tickets during the Christmas holiday basketball tourney.

Anyone who has seen Murray is asked to contact the New Hampshire State Police at 603-846-3333 or 603-271-1170. People also can call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 40
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:41:17 pm
The Caldedonian-Record

Saturday February 28, 2004

Relatives May Have Found A Clue

By Gary E. Lindsley

Haverhill, New Hampshire -- Relatives of Maura Murray have found what may be a clue in her disappearance.

Kathleen Murray found a pair of white, women's underwear lying on the snow near French Pond Road in Haverhill, Thursday.

Murray said she does not know if they are connected to the disappearance of her sister, who has not been seen since the night of her car accident on Route 112, about a mile east of Swiftwater.

Maura was driving a black 1996 Saturn Feb. 9 when her car failed to negotiate a sharp, left curve past The Weathered Barn and went off the road. Maura is a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Kathleen and her brother, Freddy, have been scouring the area around the accident site every day.

"I have been making my way down (toward the French Pond Road area)," Kathleen said. "We have been tracking through quite a bit of snow."

She turned the underwear over to Haverhill Police and said it will be about two weeks before DNA results come back.

"Hopefully, they will turn out not to be hers," Kathleen said. "Maybe it was just teenagers having fun. The area is pretty secluded."

Kathleen does not believe Maura has just taken off and doesn't want to be found.

"I know my sister," she said. "We were really close. If she were in trouble, she would have called me. I am extremely worried."

Kathleen is hoping to hold some type of fund-raiser to help boost the pledge reward fund established to help find Maura. It currently stands at about $30,000. Family and friends have sought the assistance of a private investigator.

R.C. Stevens of PSII Inc., a Northampton, Mass., private investigation agency, is looking into the disappearance.

Anyone who has seen Maura or may have information, is asked to contact the New Hampshire State Police at 603-846-3333 or 603-271-1170; or the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.

She is 5 feet, 7 inches tall, weighs about 120 pounds, has brown hair and blue eyes, and was last seen wearing a dark coat and jeans.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 41
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:43:39 pm
The Patriot Ledger

February 28, 2004

A family waits and wonders: What happened to Maura?

Joe McGee

WELLS RIVER, Vt. - Kathleen Murray scatters the belongings on a motel room floor like pieces of a puzzle. The bag of stuff is what her sister, Maura Murray of Hanson, left behind when she was last seen Feb. 9 in Woodsville, N.H. - clothes, CDs, makeup and a copy of Not Without Peril," journalist Nicholas Howe's story about people who died hiking New Hampshire's Presidential Mountain Range.

For Kathleen Murray, the book is unnerving because it talks about the rural region of northern New Hampshire where Murray was last seen.

My father gave it to her. I don't know what it could mean," the Hanover resident said.

The conditions couldn't have been worse for 21-year-old Murray when she disappeared. It was dark and freezing on the stretch of Route 112 that runs along the Wild Ammonoosuc River near the Vermont border. Police believe Murray was on her own. Nobody knew she left the campus at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst where she was a junior studying nursing.

Then she crashed. The only roadside help was a 350-pound man named Butch Atwood, an imposing figure whose presence wouldn't be that welcoming to a young woman in the dead of the night, according to his wife.

Murray's family has lived in a nearby motel ever since, trying to piece together the mystery of her disappearance. After two weeks, there are few good leads. All they have are the bag of items she didn't take with her, wherever she went.

I know she was up here on her own will, but something altered her plans along the way and it could've been foul play. Nothing else makes sense," said Fred Murray of Hanson, Maura's brother.

The scene of the accident in the Woodsville section of Haverhill, N.H., is at a sharp bend of Route 112, which is marked by an old red barn that at one time was a gift shop for summer travelers visiting the White Mountains. Police believe Murray left UMass that afternoon, possibly upset over cracking up her father's car days earlier, or for some other reason nobody knows about.

It's not certain if she was going west on Route 112 toward Vermont, or east into New Hampshire, but the car went off the road into some brush at about 7 p.m.

The accident couldn't have been that bad. One little nick on a tree is all that marks the scene other than the missing" posters family and friends stapled up. Damage to the Saturn sedan was minimal, but Murray's head cracked the windshield. The front of the car was pushed in.

Bus driver Butch Atwood was coming around the bend in his school bus after dropping off a group of skiers who had been in North Conway for the day. He stopped, offered Murray help, and kept going when she said she had called AAA. Atwood parked the bus at his home, about 100 yards up Route 112, walked inside and told his wife Barbara what happened.

Another neighbor called police, who arrived within minutes. They found the bag, some bottles of alcohol, and that was it. Maura Murray was gone.

Police searched the area for days but there were no obvious clues. There were no footprints and a bloodhound lost a scent on the road near the Atwoods house. Ever since, Fred and Kathleen Murray and other family members have been staying at a motel in Wells River, a town just over the border from New Hampshire.

Police are treating the disappearance as a missing persons case, and a stagnant one at that. The only significant lead turned up in Burlington, Vt., but it went nowhere. Authorities said Murray had downloaded Internet directions to Burlington. Fred and Kathleen Murray say they're growing frustrated but won't give up.

The chapter of Howe's book titled "A Question of Life or Death" is book-marked with a Hallmark card and a photograph of Maura's brother Kurtis in a Little League uniform. Kathleen Murray got emotional looking it.

"We have to find something just to get this going again. We need every lead followed up," she said.

For the family, trying to find the clue that will escalate the search is literally like trying to find a needle in a haystack in such an open, rural area. Every morning Murray family members search snowmobile trails, snowy fields, general stores and frozen ponds to look for footprints, and people to talk to. They're looking for anything.

It's all anyone's talking about these days around the area, and everybody has a theory.

"Without fail, everybody who comes in here asks, "Have they found her yet?' One kid came in telling me, "They found her in Berlin (N.H.).' I would've known that if they did," said Bill Matteson, owner of Swiftwater Stagestop, a general store on Route 112, close to the accident scene.

"Many people who live in this part of the state are immigrants" from Massachusetts, who came here to get away from stuff like this," said Jeannette Wrigley, a Dorchester native and manager of the McDonald's in Haverhill.

"Personally, I think somebody picked her up," Wrigley said.

Butch and Barbara Atwood are from Raynham and Taunton, respectively. They consider Haverhill much safer than where they grew up in Southeastern Massachusetts.

"I might be afraid if I saw Butch. He's 350 pounds and has this mustache," Barbara Atwood said.

But she said there would have been no reason for Murray to fear anyone in an area where people know and look out for each other.

Said ice fisherman R.O. Richards of Lisbon, N.H., in his ice shanty on French Pond in Haverhill, "We have some thieves that might steal the teeth off a billy goat, but maybe that's it."

Matteson said people know not to mess with each other" in this part of rural New Hampshire. Nearly everyone has a gun, he said. Matteson said he thinks that Murray walked away on her own, and got lost in the woods. It has happened before, according to locals.

An armed society is a safe society, that's why we have no crime," Matteson said.

In my opinion, it's a numbers game. On a Monday at 7 at night, maybe three cars went by here, at best. What are the odds that one is a predator?" he said.

Locals are conditioned to deal with the weather, but wandering off could be fatal for a tourist. This week it was considered mild, even though the temperatures were below freezing and even colder with fierce winds. Without a good jacket and supplies good luck," log cabin builder Mark Hesseltine said.

Not if you're not from around here, no way you're going to survive," Hesseltine said.

New Hampshire State Police and FBI agents in Massachusetts are now focusing on Murray's reason for leaving school. Nobody is thinking harder about Murray's state of mind than her sister Kathleen, one of her closest confidantes. The Saturday before Murray left school, she and her father, Frederick Murray of Weymouth, were shopping for a new car in Amherst because her Saturn was running on three cylinders.

It is also known that Murray got a phone call the Thursday before she left that disturbed her to the point that she needed to be escorted to her dormitory room by a supervisor. Friends in Amherst told the family they don't know what the call was about. Her father didn't think she seemed upset that weekend.

Looking at her sister's personal effects, Kathleen Murray wondered what went wrong.

She always told me everything. At school she had a few friends, but the people she was closest to was her boyfriend, or me, or my sister Julie. We would've known," Kathleen Murray said.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 42
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:46:01 pm
Boston Herald

March 2, 2004

Page 16

Missing woman's sister finds underwear near crash site

By Marie Szaniszlo

The sister of a University of Massachusetts nursing student who vanished three weeks ago after crashing her car on a New Hampshire road discovered a pair of women's underwear a few miles from the crash scene.

Kathleen Murray found the white panties lying on the snow Thursday near Fresh Pond Road in Haverhill, N.H. The spot was about four miles from the spot where her sister Maura skidded into a snowbank on Route 112, Sharon Rausch, the mother of the missing woman's boyfriend, said yesterday. Kathleen Murray turned the clothing over to Haverhill police for DNA testing.

Her sister, a 21-year-old former West Point cadet who transferred to UMass-Amherst, packed her room and e-mailed university staff Feb. 9 that she would be out for a week. As an excuse, she said there had been a death in her family.

Haverhill police waited 36 hours after the crash to begin a full-scale search, and waited more than a week to ask for the FBI's help on a limited basis. Frustrated by the delays in the investigation, the Hanson family has begun consulting with a private detective.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 43
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:48:23 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Boston Globe / Nashua Telegraph

March 2, 2004

Investigator joins search for woman

A private investigator is assisting in the search for a missing Massachusetts woman who was last seen three weeks ago following a minor car crash in northern New Hampshire. R. C. Stevens of PSII Inc., a Northampton, Mass., private investigation agency, is helping to look into the disappearance of 21-year-old Maura Murray, who was last seen the night of Feb. 9. It appears that Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was planning a getaway. She lied to professors about a death in the family, said she would be gone from class for the week, then packed her belongings as if she were moving out. Her family and friends believe she was given a ride and want police to treat her disappearance as a criminal investigation.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 44
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:50:45 pm
Boston Globe

March 2, 2004

Where could Maura be?

By Brian McGrory

The mystery continues to deepen around Maura Murray, the nursing student who vanished in New Hampshire three weeks ago after she slammed her car into some trees on a dark, rural road.

Investigators have determined the origin of an unusual telephone call that Murray received a few nights before she fled the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. The conversation upset her so much that she had to be escorted from her job to her dorm room.

The call, according to UMass police Lieutenant Robert Thrasher, came from one of Murray's two sisters. But Thrasher said police have yet to receive an explanation of what was so upsetting.

Yesterday, Fred Murray, the girls' father, said he was told that Maura's sister called her to talk about a "monstrous" fight with a boyfriend. "But I don't think that would upset her all that much," Murray said.

The more details are revealed, the more baffling the case becomes, police acknowledge. Yesterday, Thrasher said that Maura had fastidiously packed all her belongings into boxes before she left school, even removing the art from her dorm room walls. Meanwhile, one UMass friend has seemingly withheld information from police, saying she didn't want to get Maura "in trouble."

UMass investigators, who have interviewed dozens of potential witnesses and combed through Murray's computer, shared an in-depth time line that preceded the disappearance. Murray received the call on Thursday evening, Feb. 5. On Saturday, Feb. 7, Maura and a girlfriend had dinner with Fred Murray, who was visiting Amherst. Afterward, the father returned to his hotel, and the two young women attended a campus party.

At 3:30 a.m. Feb. 8, Maura crashed her father's new Toyota into a roadside post. She told her father about the accident later that morning. Just after midnight on Monday morning, Feb. 9, she conducted a Map Quest search of the Berkshires and Burlington, Vt., on her personal computer.

At 3:40 p.m. Monday, she withdrew $280 from an area ATM, then stopped at a liquor store. Surveillance cameras at the bank machine and in the store show that she was alone.

Maura was next seen at 7 p.m. in the White Mountains hamlet of Haverhill, N.H., an area where she had hiked and camped with her father. School bus driver Butch Atwood came across her car in an embankment, he said, and stopped to ask if she needed help.

When she declined, he drove the 100 yards to his cabin and summoned police. By the time authorities arrived seven to 10 minutes later, she was gone. Her bank card, credit cards, and cellphone have been dormant since.

Authorities are exploring four scenarios, all of which they say contain flaws.

Least likely is that she committed suicide. She left no note. Her grades were excellent. Her medical records showed no issues, and her relationships appeared sound. One investigator characterized her ongoing e-mail exchange with her boyfriend, an Army lieutenant in Oklahoma, as "sappy."

Second unlikeliest is that, intoxicated, she ventured into the woods and was overcome by the elements. But dogs couldn't trace her scent, there were no footprints in the fresh snow, and helicopters equipped with heat-seeking devices were no help.

Third is that in the brief window of time, she was picked up by someone who abducted or killed her. But authorities believe the odds of a violent criminal coincidentally coming across her on the rural road are as remote as the location itself.

Fourth is that she was picked up by a passerby, taken to a bus station, and fled the area, possibly with little idea of the anguish she has left behind.

This may have started innocently, with a confused young woman needing a break from the pressures of student life. But it isn't ending well. Maura, if you're alive, if you're able, come home.

And if she's not, there's someone, somewhere who has some idea of what happened that night.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 45
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:53:07 pm
The Patriot Ledger

Wednesday, March 3, 2004

Leads fruitless, police stalled in Murray probe

By Joe McGee

Police investigating the disappearance of Hanson native Maura Murray have discovered that the disturbing phone conversation Murray had four days before leaving the University of Massachusetts at Amherst was with her sister.

According to her family, Murray called her sister, Kathleen Murray of Hanover, at about 10 p.m. Feb. 5, four days before she packed her belongings and headed north to New Hampshire. But what was said should not have upset the 21-year-old, Kathleen Murray said.

We didn't really talk about much. I had been fighting with my fiance', and we talked about that, but I don't know why she would be upset about that, Kathleen said.

Maura Murray's Saturn sedan crashed on Route 112 near Haverhill in northern New Hampshire at about 7 p.m. Feb. 9, hours after Murray left campus. She was gone when police arrived about 10 minutes later.

There were no footprints in the snow, and search dogs could not pick up her scent.

With the investigation well past the search-and-rescue phase, police are at a standstill trying to determine why Murray, a promising student and athlete, appears to have walked away from her college life.

A number of fresh leads have developed during the past three weeks, but none have proved fruitful, according to New Hampshire State Police Sgt. Bret Beausoleil. Nobody knows if Murray wandered into the woods and perished or if she was kidnapped.

The more time that goes by, the more concerned you get, but there is nothing we have found to point one way or the other, Beausoleil said.

Murray left UMass on the afternoon of Feb. 9. She cleaned out her dorm room as if she were leaving for good; did a MapQuest search for directions to Burlington, Vt.; took $280 in cash out of her bank account; and E-mailed her bosses and professors to say she would be away for personal reasons.

Kathleen Murray said she talked to her sister regularly to chat. Like all of their phone conversations, the one on Feb. 5 was about regular stuff, just-trying-to-get-through-the-day' kinds of things, she said.

When I heard she was crying after that, I couldn't understand why, especially because it's not like her to cry, she said.

Last week, Kathleen Murray and her brother Fred found a pair of women's underwear on a roadside in Haverhill. DNA testing had not been completed as of yesterday.

Sgt. Beausoleil said another tip, from a woman who was walking on Route 112 in Bath, N.H., on Feb. 9, also could not help investigators develop a criminal case.

The woman reported a suspicious man in a red pickup truck with Massachusetts plates eyeing her near the Stage Stop general store in Bath at about 7 that night.

According to the woman, the man left when she went into the store and headed east toward the accident scene. Ten minutes later, the woman saw Haverhill police go by in the same direction, responding to the accident.

She didn't have a license plate number, so that doesn't give us anything, Beausoleil said. We don't feel confident it's connected.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 46
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:55:29 pm
The Boston Channel

March 4, 2004

Family, Friends Pray For Woman's Safe Return

Maura Murray Last Seen Feb. 9

DUXBURY, Mass. -- Family and friends of a missing Hanson woman say they will not give up the search for the college student.

University of Massachusetts student Maura Murray, 21, disappeared in New Hampshire nearly one month ago.

NewsCenter 5's Pam Cross reported that Murray's family, frustrated by police efforts to find her, say they plan to search on their own in northern New Hampshire.

In Duxbury Thursday, a small group of Murray's mother's friends held a Mass to pray for her safe return.

The simple service, led by a priest, was small, prayerful and emotional. Murray's mother and grandmother sat in front.

Murray was last seen Feb. 9. After she left her UMass dorm, she had a car accident in Haverhill, N.H. But before police arrived to help, she disappeared, leaving her car behind.

With no evidence of foul play, authorities say it's a missing person case, but her family disagrees.

"She was abducted. She would have called. She would have called. She didn't run away. She was abducted," said Murray's mother, Laurie.

A week ago, Murray's sister found women's underwear a few miles from where Murray's car was left. The underwear is being tested for DNA. This weekend, Murray's brother and sister will search again.

"I don't like them taking the investigation in their own hands, that scares me, too. Because my daughter was out walking in the woods by herself," said Laurie Murray of her other children.

Friends say there is little they can do, except offer support to the family.

"We have no idea. We are not giving up hope. We hope Maura is found and we are praying for her safe return," said family friend Maureen Walsh.

Murray's mother feels strongly that her daughter has not stayed away of her own free will. But with few clues to go on, she said she found comfort and hope in Thursday's service.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 47
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 08:57:51 pm
The Patriot Ledger

Tuesday, March 9, 2004

Mysterious Miss: Closest friends say missing UMass student kept deepest feelings to herself

By Joe McGee

AMHERST - Kate Markopoulos considers herself one of Maura Murray's closest friends and yet knows she had a mysterious side.”I really didn't know (everything) about her, so now I don't find it so hard to believe'' Murray's disappearance from the University of Massachusetts, she said. She is struggling these days to figure out why Murray packed up her dormitory room a month ago today and took off for New Hampshire. Murray, a Hanson native, crashed on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., that Monday night and hasn't been seen or heard from since. Theories include that she is hiding out, was kidnapped, or wandered away disoriented and perished in the rugged, snowy woods. But what made her leave campus in the first place? She took care of stuff on her own. That's Maura,'' said Markopoulos, a senior history major from upstate New York who ran track with Murray for a year.

Murray, an excellent student and athlete at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, enjoyed challenges like hiking in the White Mountains. When she scored 1420 of a possible 1600 on her SATs, everyone knew she was headed for big things. After graduating in 2000, she was accepted to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where her older sister was a cadet. She had excellent marks and was a great runner,'' her boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch, said. Rausch met Maura through Julie Murray, his classmate at West Point. She was a top student, in great shape and, of course, extremely beautiful,'' Rausch said.

For Murray, life appeared good at West Point. Things change at West Point. Then one day things changed. Military life wasn't for Maura, after all. Rausch said West Point does that to people. His class started with 1,200 and finished with 900. That's the great thing about West Point. It forces you to grow up quick and figure out exactly what you want,'' he said. To Murray's father, Fred Murray of Weymouth, it was a surprise but not a total shock that she wanted to pursue a nursing degree at UMass. He graduated from the school and Maura's mother, Laurie, is a nurse. The decision to leave West Point after her freshman year wasn't a rash one, Rausch said. The couple researched the transfer and it was a smooth transition. The couple figured that making new friends at UMass would be hard for Murray. After all, she would be entering her sophomore year and social cliques were already set. One day, UMass track coach Julie LaFreniere introduced Murray to her teammates. Markopoulos remembered it as the typical, awkward group introduction. At first, she noticed Murray was quiet and at times elusive.''

Planning marriage, starting career Their birthdays are 11 days apart. Their friendship blossomed last year when they turned 21. Then a new Murray came out - someone who could be somewhat flirtatious'' when she drank. All along, however, she was focused on settling down with Rausch and starting a career, said Markopoulos. She held two jobs so she could fly to Oklahoma, where Rausch is stationed at Fort Sill. She planned to move there after graduation. When Rausch visited Amherst during vacations, they'd do what many couples do on the weekends: hiking in the mountains, shopping for antiques and visiting book stores in Western Massachusetts. Basically, any time together was time well spent,'' Rausch said. Their life together was beginning to take shape. We really considered ourselves engaged. We actually were looking for rings over Christmas break,'' Rausch said.

On the afternoon of Feb. 9, Murray acted like she wanted to drop everything she worked hard for in life. She packed up her belongings in her room on the fourth floor of the John F. Kennedy residence hall, including wall decorations. She left messages for professors and bosses, lying about a death in the family. Then she loaded her Saturn sedan, a car that friends said she hadn't started in weeks, and took off. Her dorm mates didn't even notice she was gone. I didn't even know she lived here,'' said Kelli Martinson, a freshman from Hull who lived five doors down from Murray.

Can't figure out what went wrong. Even after four weeks, E-mails continue to go back and forth between friends from Hanson and friends at UMass, trying to figure out what went wrong. Nobody has been able to offer frustrated investigators much about their friend's background. Katie Jones, Murray's childhood friend and a student at Western New England College in Springfield, said although they've lived a few miles apart, they never visited each other at school. She was a very secretive person,'' Jones said. She never even told us about transferring to UMass until after it happened. Sometimes we think there might be more to that story than we know,'' she said.

Sophomore Sara Alfieri is just as puzzled. She and Murray met while working at art galleries on campus, drawn to each other because of their sarcastic attitudes and love of things ironic. Kept biggest problems to herself. She was so funny. She loved the web site The Onion. Her favorite movie is. Bottle Rocket,'' Alfieri said.

Despite being so close, Murray never talked about her friends at home, a group of seven girls at Whitman-Hanson who Jones said were inseparable. Murray kept even her biggest problems to herself. She didn't say a word to Alfieri about getting into an accident in her father's car the day before she left Amherst. The accident happened only an hour after they were hanging out in Alfieri's dorm.

Alfieri said Markopoulos, Murray and a few friends were drinking into the late-night hours of Feb. 8. Fred Murray was staying in a hotel on Route 9 that weekend. He was in town to help his daughter find a new car. Father and daughter ate dinner at the Amherst Brewing Co., a popular watering hole, that night. Then Markopoulos showed up for a drink. After about an hour, they left, the girls dropped Fred Murray at his hotel, and headed to Alfieri's dorm.

Everyone's left wondering. At about 1 a.m., Alfieri said she was passed out from drinking. Markopoulos was still up with Murray and they were talking about going home at about 2:30 a.m. But Murray wanted to go to her father's hotel, according to Markopoulos.

I told her just to go back to her room and meet him in the morning, but she wouldn't listen,'' she said. About an hour later, Murray cracked up her father's Toyota Corolla on Route 9. Alfieri found out the next week from news reports about her friend's disappearance. I thought that was so weird. I talked to her that day and she didn't even say anything,'' said Alfieri Now everybody is wondering about what they don't know about Maura Murray. If she can't figure it out after three years of friendship, Markopoulos said nobody might ever know.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 48
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:00:13 pm
The Caldedonian-Record

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

Missing Woman Investigation

Potential Evidence Discounted

By Gary E. Lindsley

Maura Murray's friends and relatives were breathing a bit easier Tuesday after learning underwear found off a road in the town of Haverhill did not belong to her.

Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, turned up missing the evening of Feb. 9 after she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill. The accident scene was about one mile east of Swiftwater.

"The DNA (tests) came back yesterday ... negative," Sharon Rausch said. "We are very glad. We are very hopeful." Rausch is the mother of Billie Rausch, Murray's fiance-to-be.

Murray's sister, Kathleen, found a white pair of underpants lying on top of the snow on a secluded trail off of French Pond Road Feb. 26.

Kathleen turned them over to the Haverhill Police Department who in turn handed it over to the New Hampshire State Police.

Maura's hair brush and a toothbrush were provided to the state police crime lab in Concord along with the underwear for testing.

Although it turns out the underwear did not belong to Murray, and that provides a glimmer of hope, Rausch said the family is also realistic. "None of us believe she is willfully in hiding," she said. "But we are hopeful."

Rausch said Murray has money in her bank account. However, that money has not been touched. Her credit cards have not been used. Nor has her cell phone since the accident at around 7 p.m. Feb. 9.

Rausch said she will never give up hope. She said she was praying on her way home from work Tuesday that something would help lead them to Murray.

She recalled the miraculous story of how Elizabeth Smart had been found and returned safely to her family in Salt Lake City, Utah, in March 2003 after being held captive by a couple since June 5, 2002.

"I lost my father when I was 9," Rausch said. "My mother died when I was 31. Both of those events were very hard. But nothing has been as hard as this."

Although Murray and her son had not yet married, Rausch, with her voice quivering, said Murray's disappearance is even more difficult because she is like a daughter to her.

Whenever Murray enters a room, she said, her big, dazzling smile just brightens it up.

According to Butch Atwood, a First Student school bus driver who lives about 100 yards from where Murray lost control of her 1996 black Saturn after rounding a sharp left-hand curve near The Weathered Barn on Route 112, Murray refused help from him when he stopped.

In a renewed effort to get the word out about Murray's disappearance and jog people's memories, Rausch said 15,000 8- by 10-inch color posters of the 21-year-old have been made up.

Bethlehem Fire Chief Jack Anderson, who is also the president of the Twin State Mutual Aid Fire Association, tentatively has agreed to have firefighters throughout the twin states help distribute about 1,000 of the posters. "We will try and help through our 26 towns," Anderson said. "It's a good cause. We have to find that girl." He said he feels for Murray's family and friends.

Rausch said she also has enlisted the help of Beth Drewniak of Hanson, Mass., to help distribute the posters. She said Drewniak's daughter grew up with Murray. "We are hoping $40,000 will (jog) someone's memory," she said.

The posters show a picture of Murray with her classic big smile and dimples. It says $40,000 will be paid for any information leading to her safe return.

She is 5 feet, 7 inches tall, weighs 115 pounds, has blue-green eyes and curly brown hair.

People with any information should call the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636. Anyone who may have see Murray can also call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 49
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:02:35 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

March 26, 2004

Effort to find missing woman continues

HAVERHILL (AP) -- In a renewed effort to find a Massachusetts woman missing in northern New Hampshire, family and friends have begun distributing thousands of new posters and have announced a larger reward.

Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., disappeared Feb. 9 after a minor accident in Haverhill.

Her family has printed 15,000 new posters carrying her photo and has announced the reward leading to her whereabouts has risen to $40,000.

Firefighters in 26 Vermont and New Hampshire communities in the Haverhill area are being enlisted to help distribute the posters.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 50
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:04:57 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

March 28, 2004

Murray's father wants FBI to help

CONCORD (AP) -- The father of a missing University of Massachusetts nursing student has asked Gov. Craig Benson for help to get the FBI involved in the case.

Fred Murray of Weymouth, Mass., wants the governor to urge New Hampshire State Police to call in the FBI for help in finding Maura Murray.

She has been missing since the evening of Feb. 9 after a minor accident in which she failed to make a curve on Route 112 outside Haverhill.

"The finest resource in the world is available and you, sir, should direct" state police to seek FBI help, Murray said in his letter. "There are corollary cases in Vermont also and this entire situation begs for central coordination and investigation by an agency which is not bound by the confines of configuration of Grafton County and the Connecticut River."

Murray referred to Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., who disappeared after she left work late on March 19. Her car was found about one mile from the restaurant in Montgomery, Vt., where she worked.

Murray said the FBI offered its assistance during the week of his daughter's disappearance, but state police declined the offer.

State police Lt. John Scarinza has said state police have enough resources to conduct the investigation.

Benson's office released a statement that said he "has complete faith in the efforts of the New Hampshire State Police in the manner in which this case is being handled."

The office included a letter from state police Col. Frederick Booth that said investigators have contacted Massachusetts police, Vermont State Police, FBI and many surrounding county and local police agencies.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 51
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:07:19 pm
The Caledonian-Record

March 29, 2004

Vermont Woman Turns Out Missing After Car Crash

By Gary E. Lindsley

Another young woman has turned up missing after a car accident on a dark, rural highway - this time in Vermont.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., has disappeared after being involved in a one-car accident late at night on the East Berkshire Road in northern Vermont.

This comes on the heels of the disappearance of Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has not been seen since she was involved in a one-car accident on a dark stretch of rural Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., Feb. 9.

Maitland was working at the Black Lantern in Montgomery March 19, when she clocked out at 11:20 p.m. and headed to her friend's house in Sheldon, where she was living. She had even left her friend a note saying what time she would be home from work.

She never made it.

Her car was found by police early the morning of March 20, with its rear end in an abandoned building. The car was about a mile from the Black Lantern, where Maitland is a dishwasher.

However, Maitland's parents were not notified about the accident although the car is registered to the mother, Kellie.

It wasn't until Tuesday, March 23, when Brianna's friends contacted the Maitlands, that they became aware something was wrong.

"They asked us if Brianna had moved back in with us," Bruce Maitland said. It was the first he and his wife had heard she was missing.

The Maitlands contacted state police in St. Albans to file a missing person's report. Troopers told them an all points bulletin would be put out about Brianna and her 1988 Oldsmobile.

State police did not draw any connection between Brianna and the car, until Thursday morning, nearly a week after the accident. The Maitlands were called about the Oldsmobile. Bruce Maitland said it was her car.

The Maitlands don't understand why state police did not call them after finding the car because the car is registered in Kellie's name.

"That was a huge error on their part," Bruce Maitland said. "I asked why we weren't notified. They said the telephone number did not match the address. All they would have had to do was look in the telephone book."

He said the state police have been very leery about sharing information with the family. "I gave them a good lead, the only one they have," he said. He did not want to publicly divulge what it was because he didn't want to compromise the investigation.

The Maitlands have also turned something else over to state police, a woman's jacket found near the accident scene. "It had a wallet with a woman's name and credit cards," Bruce Maitland said.

He said it appeared the woman was from California and had recently moved to Vermont. It also appeared she was a certified ski instructor.

With his daughter missing, as well as Murray, now finding this woman's jacket, Maitland is worried there may be someone in the area preying on young women.

Kellie Maitland is upset because state police have said they believe her daughter just took off.

She said a co-worker supposedly told troopers Brianna had said she was going to take off on a short trip.

Kellie Maitland does not believe that because she said her daughter was doing really well. She had recently passed her GED with flying colors, and worked at the Black Lantern and as a hostess at KJ's Diner in St. Albans.

"Her jobs are going well," Kellie Maitland said. "She has been upbeat. Everything seemed fine."

She also doesn't believe her daughter hit a patch of ice and slid off the road into the building. "I saw the pictures (of the accident scene)," Kellie Maitland said. "I know it was not her doing."

And she also does not believe Brianna just took off. "There weren't any keys in the car," she said. "And her two paychecks were on the front seat untouched."

Also, her ATM card, medication, makeup, clothes and contact lenses were still at her friend's house.

"She is very pretty," Kellie Maitland said. "I saw her earlier in the day (March 19). I had taken her shopping to get her dress slacks. She had a good time."

Brianna is 5 feet, 4 inches tall, weighs 105 pounds, has hazel eyes and medium length brown hair.

She also has a nose stud in her left nostril and a faint scar in her left eyebrow.

Kellie Maitland said her daughter, if she were planning a trip, would have come to her for money. She doesn't understand why state police are treating this as a young woman taking off.

"I don't want anyone else going through what Maura's family is going through," Kellie Maitland said.

State police in Vermont have not been available to talk about the Maitland investigation. Detective Sgt. Heidi Glynn was unavailable for comment Friday and Sunday.

When Sharon Rausch heard another young woman has turned up missing, under similar circumstances, and that state police are treating the case as a missing person rather than a criminal investigation, she was upset.

"It's like living it all over again," said Rausch, whose son, Billie, is Maura Murray's fiance-to-be. "I feel so sorry for her."

New Hampshire State Police had not heard about Maitland's disappearance in Vermont.

People with information about Maitland should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 52
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:09:41 pm
The Caledonian-Record

March 31, 2004

VSP Forensics Team Studies Missing Teen's Car

By Gary E. Lindsley

A forensics team from the Vermont State Police lab in Waterbury began poring over a missing teenager's car Tuesday to obtain possible evidence, including whether foul play may have been involved in her disappearance.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, has been missing since she left the Black Lantern in Montgomery at 11:20 p.m. March 19. Her 1985 Oldsmobile sedan was found partially ensconced in an abandoned building off of East Berkshire Road, about a mile from the Black Lantern where she worked as a dishwasher.

Lt. Thomas Nelson, who is in charge of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation at the St. Albans barracks, said the forensics team began its investigation around 2 p.m. Tuesday.

Nelson said one of the things the team will be looking for is any sign of a struggle which may have occurred the night Maitland disappeared.

"The initial investigation did not show there was a violent struggle," he said. "We hope it's not a crime."

The Oldsmobile was discovered by a neighbor around 1:22 a.m. March 20, according to Nelson. The vehicle had sustained minor damage.

"It looked like it had been backed into the building," he said. "It did not look like a regular accident."

Kellie Maitland, Brianna's mother, also believes her daughter was not in an accident. She believes someone else was involved and forced the car into the building.

Maitland, and her husband, Bruce, are upset because they were never notified the car had been found, although Kellie is the registered owner.

The Maitlands were told by Brianna's friends March 23 she was missing and they filed a missing person report. State police did not mention anything about the car being found.

It wasn't until Thursday, nearly a week after Brianna's disappearance that investigators made a connection between the car and Brianna's disappearance, according to the Maitlands.

Nelson said he cannot say why the Maitlands were not notified March 20 when the car was found.

The reason could have been, according to Nelson, that the car was on private property and it didn't look like it had been involved in an accident.

"Oftentimes, people do leave their cars beside the road because maybe they had too much to drink," he said.

Also, it wasn't apparent to investigators Brianna had been the last person to drive the vehicle. However, the Maitlands said Brianna's paychecks were in the car.

Nelson said a couple of ground and air searches have been conducted of the area around the accident scene, although the area between the accident scene and the Black Lantern has not been searched. The searches have involved K-9 units and a helicopter from the Vermont National Guard.

"Troopers have done walks through the fields," Nelson said. "The search has been concentrated." So far, he said, nothing has turned up.

Regarding a woman's jacket which the Maitlands found in the area near the accident scene, Nelson said he does not believe there is any connection to Brianna's disappearance. However, he also said investigators haven't located the owner of the jacket yet.

When asked if investigators were looking at a possible connection between Brianna's disappearance in northern Vermont and the Feb. 9 disappearance of 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray, Nelson said they have not made any direct connection between the two cases.

"We never rule anything out," he said. "We will talk to (New Hampshire State Police)."

Murray, who is a resident of Hanson, Mass., disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after she had a car accident on a dark stretch of Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., about a mile east of the hamlet of Swiftwater.

Murray failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve past The Weathered Barn.

In another development, the Klaaskids Foundation, which was established in 1994 after Polly Klaas was abducted and murdered, has offered the Maitlands assistance searching for their daughter.

The foundation's search center director Brad Dennis has spoken with them about how he can assist them.

Dennis said the foundation also is working on contacting news groups nationally to help with finding Brianna.

Nelson said he would be more than willing to talk with people from the foundation's search center.

People with any information about Brianna, who is 5 feet, 4 inches tall, weighs 105 pounds, has hazel eyes and medium length brown hair, should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Brianna has a nose stud in her left nostril and a faint scar in her left eyebrow.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 53
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:12:03 pm
The Caledonian Record

Friday, April 2, 2004

K-9 Teams To Search For Murray

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL NEW HAMPSHIRE - Family and friends say they have not given up hope that 21-year-old Maura Murray, of Hanson, Mass., will be found.

Although an official air and ground search was declared concluded by New Hampshire Fish and Game and Troop F State Police officials in February, K-9 teams from the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association will resume their search of the Haverhill area this weekend.

Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Murray's fiance-to-be, said she, her son and Murray's family have not given up hope she will be found and safely returned.

However, Rausch said they also know a lot of time has elapsed since Murray's black 1996 Saturn was found off the road near The Weathered Barn along Route 112, about a mile east of the hamlet of Swiftwater, Feb. 9.

This weekend, like last weekend, K-9 teams from the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association will conduct a search of the area surrounding the accident site.

Rausch said one of the teams is Marilyn Greene, a team trainer and private investigator, and her K-9, Buddy, from Guilderland, N.Y.

Fred Murray, Maura's father, said he was impressed by the teams when they searched the area last weekend. He will be returning to the accident scene this weekend to search areas not being searched by the K-9 teams.

On another front, Rausch is enlisting the help of University of Massachusetts at Amherst officials. Maura was a junior nursing student there.

Rausch is asking them to send an e-mail message to the university's 40,000 students through a blind e-mailer between April 15 and 20.

The e-mail will read, "Please help us find Maura. Please forward this to all the contacts in your address book."

The e-mail will contain information about what Maura looks like as well as information about the accident which she was involved in the night of Feb. 9.

"It will literally (reach) hundreds of thousands of people," Rausch said.

She is holding off sending out the e-mail right now because about 15,000 posters are being distributed in Vermont and New Hampshire, as well as at UMass.

Rausch also wants to do something special for Maura's 22nd birthday May 4. Initially, she wanted to have balloons released.

However, she said the family and friends will ask people to tie blue ribbons around trees as well as to their car antennas.

The following message also will be released May 4: "Maura's family prays for her safe return on her birthday."

Maura is 5 feet, 7 inches tall, weighs 115 pounds, has blue-green eyes and curly brown hair.

She is soft-spoken and is an avid runner, logging between five and six miles daily.

People with any information should call the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636, or the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 54
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:14:25 pm
Pittsfield Berkshire Eagle / Portsmouth Herald / Boston Globe / The New Hampshire Union Leader

April 4, 2004

Note: The Portsmouth Herald has additional paragraphs and some alternative wording in italics and the New Hampshire Union Leader has some additional words in italics as well.

More searches set for Mass. woman

Family still hoping to find missing woman

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) — Family and friends continued their search this weekend for a Massachusetts woman who disappeared after a car accident in northern New Hampshire in February.

"I'll never give up hope,” the missing woman’s mother, Laurie Murray, said through tears yesterday.

Although state officials ended their search weeks ago, K-9 dog teams from the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association resumed searching the Haverhill area for any sign of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson. Mass.

Police have said there is no evidence of foul play and are treating the disappearance as a missing person investigation.* Numerous searches, using dogs and helicopter, turned up no sign that Murray wandered into the snow-covered woods and led police to sat Murray may have wanted to get away on her own for a while.*

Searchers found no signs of struggle at the scene, and it appears Murray was planning a getaway. She lied to professors about a death in the family, and said she would be gone from class for the week. Then she packed her belongings as if she was moving out. Police said Murray may have wanted to get away for a while.

Her mother said she doesn’t buy it.

From her home in Hanson, Mrs. Murray said she doesn't buy it.

“Two months, and there have been no clues, nothing. Isn't that odd." she said. Laurie Murray, whose daughter attended the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, said she planned to travel to the Haverhill area today to deliver a message to police.

The distraught mother/Mrs. Murray said she planned to travel to the Haverhill area on Sunday to deliver a message to police.

Mrs. Murray said she also wants to help distribute new fliers announcing that the reward for information leading to Maura Murray has risen to $40,000 Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Murray's boyfriend, said she her son and Murray’s family have not given up hope she will be found and safely returned.

“She's not a runaway,” she said. “ She was abducted. She would never not call her family."

Fred Murray, the missing woman’s father, said he was impressed by the teams when they searched the area last weekend. He was returning to the scene this weekend to search areas not being searched by the K 9 teams.

Meanwhile, Rausch is enlisting the help of University of Massachusetts at Amherst officials. Murray was a junior nursing student there Rausch is asking them to send an e mail message to students this month reading: “Please help us find Maura. Please forward this to all the contacts in your address book." The email will contain a description of Murray and information about the accident on the night of Feb. 9. "It will literally (reach) hundreds of thousands of people," Rausch said.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 55
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:16:47 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 8, 2004

America's Most Wanted Producers Decline To Profile Missing Woman Case Seventeen Magazine To Publish Story

By Gary E. Lindsley

The television show "America's Most Wanted" will not profile the case of a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student who disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after she was involved in a one-car crash on Route 112 in Haverhill.

Maura Murray, a resident of Hanson, Mass., and a junior at the UMass Amherst campus, was driving a black 1996 Saturn at about 7 p.m. when she failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve and went off the right side of Route 112 after driving past The Weathered Barn.

Jeremy Cohen, managing editor for "America's Most Wanted," says Murray's case will not be profiled on the Fox network's TV show.

"I know about the case," Cohen said. "I have been aware of it since it happened. Unfortunately, we can't do many missing cases at all."

He says the show devotes most of its missing people air time to cases involving children.

"As for adults," Cohen said, "we only do it when there is clear evidence of a crime."

Unless it's clear to the show's producers a crime has been committed, a case won't be aired.

"It's been our experience when we can't tell our viewers what to look for, we don't get a response," he said. "We save our space on our show (for a case) only if it would be successful. Unfortunately, we turn down a lot of cases."

While "America's Most Wanted" officials are refusing to profile Murray's case, Seventeen, a magazine geared toward 12- to 24-year-old girls and young women, is very interested.

Members of the magazine's staff have been interviewing Murray's friends and family members. Elizabeth Dye, a spokeswoman for Seventeen, said there isn't a run date yet for the story, though she feels it should resonate among the magazine's subscribers.

"We feel like other young women can learn from circumstances from everyday situations," Dye said. "We also believe there is a community of readers out there who may be able to help."

She said Seventeen's readers will be able to identify with Murray.

Dye said Seventeen's circulation is 2.1 million readers, but she estimates the magazine actually reaches about 14 million people through its presence in doctors' offices, libraries and other venues.

Fred Murray, Maura's father, has been searching the area where his daughter had her accident every weekend since he was notified. He was not happy with the decision of "America's Most Wanted."

"I am really disappointed," Murray said. "It has an extensive audience and is so influential."

Lt. John Scarinza of New Hampshire State Police Troop F and Haverhill Police Chief Jeffery Williams both have said they, too, would welcome the TV show profiling the case.

If the show did profile Maura's disappearance, he said, maybe someone somewhere in the country, who may have been traveling through the Haverhill, N.H., area the night of Feb. 9, may recall seeing something. Or they may remember having seen her get on a bus somewhere.

"It's just the national scope of it," he said. "Plus, it would put pressure on the state police to call in the FBI. You have two close to one another, geographically and chronologically."

Murray was referring to not only his own daughter, but also to Brianna Maitland, 17, who has been missing since leaving work late the night of March 19. Maitland's car was found with its rear end in an abandoned building about a mile from the Black Lantern in Montgomery, Vt., during the early-morning hours of March 20. She hasn't been seen since.

Murray, though, is happy Seventeen magazine will be profiling his daughter.

"I will take any help I possibly can get," he said. "Everything helps."

Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Maura's boyfriend, is also glad Seventeen is interested.

"I am thrilled," Rausch said. "This has been in the works for awhile."

She said the magazine had sent an e-mail to Maura Murray's Web site, www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html, leaving a message they were interested in publishing a piece.

Maura is 5 feet, 7 inches tall, weighs 115 pounds, and has blue-green eyes and curly brown hair. Anyone with information should call the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636, or the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 56
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:19:09 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 9, 2004

Vermont, N.H. State Police Rule Out Connection Between Disappearances - Search Resumes For Vermont Teen

By Gary E. Lindsley

Vermont and New Hampshire state police say there isn't a connection between the disappearances of two young women within the past couple of months.

They say both disappeared after their vehicles were involved in motor vehicle accidents, but that is the extent of the similarity.

Maura Murray, a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student from Hanson, Mass., has been missing since she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., has been missing since she left work at the Black Lantern in Montgomery the night of March 19. Her car was found the next morning with its rear end partially inside an abandoned building about a mile from the Black Lantern on the East Berkshire Road.

"We have been in contact with Vermont State Police several times," said Lt. John Scarinza of New Hampshire State Police Troop F.

He said there aren't any similarities other than Murray and Maitland disappeared after accidents.

Lt. Thomas Nelson of the Vermont State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation at the St. Albans barracks, also said there isn't a connection.

Bruce Maitland, Brianna's father, said the family and friends will be conducting another search for her this weekend.

Maitland said a command center will be set up at the East Franklin Store. A search will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday. The phone number at the store is 802-933-4100.

The family received help with a major search last weekend from Brad Dennis of the Klaaskids Foundation Search Center. The foundation was established in 1994 after Polly Klaas was abducted and murdered.

Maitland said the experience was invaluable and will help the family conduct another search this weekend.

During the search last weekend, duct tape and clothing were found and turned over to state police. However, Nelson says none of it was connected to Brianna's disappearance.

Maitland said a lot of tips have been received. He praised VSP for doing a good job, although he believes they made mistakes in the beginning.

On the other hand, Fred Murray, Maura's father, is upset with the response of New Hampshire State Police in its investigation into his daughter's disappearance and what he says is law enforcement's reluctance to get the FBI fully involved.

Murray is going to be speaking with Scarinza today to appeal to him to bring the FBI in. He also is asking for the public's help.

"I am appealing to the public," he said "I want people to walk their fence lines and their property. Get help if you need it."

"She could have ducked up a driveway and around a house," Murray went on to say. "And I am not just appealing to people in New Hampshire. I am also appealing to people in Vermont, especially since a young girl in Vermont is missing."

When members of Maura's family searched her 1996 black Saturn after her disappearance, they found information indicating Maura may have intended on going to the Stowe and Burlington areas in Vermont.

People with information about Maitland should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007
Title: Newspaper Articles # 57
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:21:32 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 10, 2004

Murray's Family Enlists Help From Psychic Profiler

By Gary E. Lindsley

Maura Murray's family has enlisted the help of a nationally known psychic profiler to help them find her.

Murray, a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student from Hanson, Mass., has not been seen since she was involved in a one-car accident in Haverhill, N.H. Feb. 9.

Carla Baron of Los Angeles, Calif., has come up with a theory about what happened to Murray the night her car failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve after driving by The Weathered Barn.

Baron, along with Maura's father, Fred, want to reserve some of the information so New Hampshire State Police can have a chance to act on it.

She believes Maura was picked up by someone passing through the area where the accident occurred.

"I believe she is no longer with us," Baron said.

She has told Maura's father she believes Maura met with foul play.

Baron, a psychic profiler who helped lead police to finding the body of a man who had committed suicide in a cornfield in the Midwest, has provided Fred Murray with a description of the person who picked her up as well as the type of vehicle.

She has also told him in what kind of an area Maura can be found.

"I have been in touch with Maura," Baron said.

Maura met with foul play the same night as the accident, she said.

What really concerns Murray, is what else Baron has told her. She has told him there is another woman who can be found near Maura who has fallen victim to the same person. And, Baron also told him there have been others.

Murray does not want too many details released right away to the public until the state police have had time to analyze the information and search possible locations.

Baron has been able to obtain somewhat of a description about the man as well as where she can possibly be found by talking twice with Maura's father via the telephone for a total of about 21/2 hours.

"It's called remote viewing," she said, referring to how she obtained the information about what happened to Maura by talking to her father.

Murray said he spoke with Lt. John Scarinza and others from New Hampshire State Police Troop F Friday.

"I gave them my theory that someone picked her up," he said.

He asked them, again, to bring in the FBI and make a direct appeal to the public for any information they may have in helping find his daughter.

"I asked him if he would accept help from a nationally known psychic," Murray said.

He said Scarinza mentioned they had been contacted by other psychics.

"They said they would accept help from a psychic," he said.

Murray is hoping state police and Baron talk soon.

Baron has appeared in episodes of "Psychic Detectives" on Court TV and will be seen in a segment of ABC's "Primetime" at 10 p.m. Thursday.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 58
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:23:54 pm
Boston Globe

April 11, 2004

Missing student's kin skeptical of psychic

By Peter DeMarco

Maura Murray's parents have reacted with skepticism to a nationally known psychic profiler who believes the missing college student was abducted and murdered after vanishing from a rural New Hampshire road on Feb. 9.

"I don't believe her," said Laurie Murray, of Hanson, whose daughter disappeared without a trace after crashing her car into a snowbank in Woodsville, N.H. "I don't believe in [psychics] at all."

Murray's father, Fred Murray, of Weymouth, said he was not sure whether to believe California profiler Carla Baron, who said she has had psychic visions of his daughter's abduction and death.

But with law enforcement officials at a loss to explain his 21-year-old daughter's disappearance, Fred Murray said he is willing to listen to anyone offering help.

"About five or six psychics have contacted me. I have no idea whether they know what they're talking about or not," he said. "If they're wrong, they're wrong. It's worth a try, [as] the police seem to be out of ideas and there's no information coming forward."

Murray, who believes his daughter was abducted, said he contacted Baron a few weeks ago after being told of her strong track record with missing persons cases. The California psychic said she has helped dozens of police departments with homicide and missing persons cases over the past 20 years.

Baron said yesterday that after speaking with Fred Murray on the phone, she saw visions of Maura Murray and received messages from her in the form of thoughts.

Baron said she believes Murray hitched a ride with "a clean-cut looking man" in a truck following her car accident the night of Feb. 9. The man then sexually assaulted her and buried her body in a sparsely wooded area that may be a construction site, Baron said.

Her assailant, Baron added, has killed at least one other woman whose body is buried close to Murray's. "He happened to be driving by her. It was an opportunity. That's the thrill for him -- he never knows where the thrill will be," Baron said.

Baron equated her visions to snippets of a movie film, in which she perceives some details but not others. She could not say where Murray was picked up by her assailant, or whether Murray had hitched previous rides.

The psychic said she also was not sure why Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and former college track star, abruptly packed her belongings the day she disappeared and drove to New Hampshire without telling any friends or family members of her plans.

Fred Murray said he met with New Hampshire State Police on Friday to inform them about Baron's psychic reading. At his urging, Baron said, she left her contact information with investigators.

Baron, who was featured with psychic John Edwards on the 2003 Court TV program "Psychic Detectives," and has made several television and radio appearances, acknowledged that her readings are often met with skepticism.

While in some instances she has led invesigators directly to victims, she said, on other occasions her input is merely a starting point for an investigation.

"Hopefully we can start talking," she said. "Even if there is one little piece of information I have that can assist them in finding where she is, it's [worth it]."

New Hampshire State Police have said they have yet to find evidence of foul play in Murray's disappearance. The lead investigator on the case, John Scarinza, could not be reached yesterday.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 59
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 10, 2019, 09:26:16 pm
Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise / The New Hampshire Union Leader / Nashua Telegraph / Portsmouth Herald / Lowell Sun

Sunday, April 11, 2004

Note: The Lowell Sun includes additional detail, in bold at the bottom.

Missing UMass student’s family turns to psychic

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) — The family of a Massachusetts woman missing in northern New Hampshire for two months turned to a psychic to try to get some answers — and they didn’t get good news.

The psychic said she believes the young woman is dead, the victim of a serial killer.

University of Massachusetts nursing student Maura Murray has not been seen since she was involved in a one-car accident in Haverhill on Feb. 9.

Police have said there are no signs of foul play, but her family, and now nationally known psychic Carla Baron say they believe someone picked Murray up after the accident and harmed her.

Baron, of Los Angeles, believes Murray was picked up by a man passing through the area.

“I believe she is no longer with us,” Baron said.

Baron, a psychic profiler who helped lead police to finding the body of a man who had committed suicide in a cornfield in the Midwest, has provided Murray’s father, Fred, with a description of the person she believes picked up the woman, as well as the type of vehicle.

Fred Murray said Baron also told him there is another woman’s body near his daughter’s — a victim of the same person. And, Baron told him there have been others.

Murray told the Caledonia Record he does not want too many details released right away so police have time to analyze the information and search possible locations.

He said he spoke with Lt. John Scarinza, who has been in charge of the case, on Friday.

He asked police, again, to bring in the FBI and make a direct appeal to the public for any information they may have in helping find his daughter.

He said Scarinza mentioned police had been contacted by other psychics.

Meanwhile, Vermont and New Hampshire state police say there is no connection between the disappearances of Murray and a young woman over the border in Vermont.

Both disappeared after the next being involved in traffic accidents, but police say that is with its rear where the similarities end.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., has been missing since she left work in Montgomery, Vt., the night of March 19. Her car was found the nest morning with its rear end partially inside an abandoned building about a mile away.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 60
Post by: fulkstop on December 10, 2019, 09:30:35 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise

April 12, 2004

Parents skeptical of psychic’s analysis

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) — The parents of a Massachusetts woman missing in northern New Hampshire for two months reacted with skepticism to a psychic profiler’s belief that the young woman was abducted and killed. Maura Murray’s father, Fred, contacted the California psychic and is unsure if he believes her, but the missing woman’s mother says she is disregarding Carla Baron’s belief that Maura Murray was the victim of a serial killer.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 61
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:39:13 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 14, 2004

Family, Friends Warned About Trespassing - Missing Woman

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL, NH - The investigation into the disappearance of 21-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student Maura Murray has encountered an odd twist.

Fred Murray, Maura's father, has been warned that he, other family members, friends and canine search teams face possible arrest if they trespass on private property in an area surrounding the site of Maura's accident.

Maura, a Hanson, Mass., resident and junior at the UMass Amherst campus, disappeared after she was involved in a one-car accident the night of Feb. 9 on Route 112 in Haverhill, about a mile east of Swiftwater. Fred Murray received a letter, dated April 2, from Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams warning against trespassing.

Williams states in his letter his department has received a written request from area residents complaining about repeated trespassing and parking problems on their properties.

"While they are sympathetic with the cause to find Maura, the right to quiet enjoyment of their personal property has been repeatedly and blatantly disregarded to the point that they now must insist that absolutely no one has permission to trespass on their properties," Williams wrote Murray.

The property owners, according to Williams, are specifically excluding the following from their parking lots and properties: Murray family members, friends and relatives of Maura Murray; volunteer searchers and canine handlers; private investigators; members of the press; and anyone else seeking clues or searching for Maura Murray.

"The Haverhill Police Department will honor their wishes to remove unwanted vehicles and/or ask trespassers to leave immediately," Williams wrote in his letter. "Repeat offenders will be arrested." Thank you for your understanding and cooperation in this matter." Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Maura's boyfriend, was flabbergasted when she learned about the letter.

"I am amazed!" Rausch exclaimed. "He gets a written note, not a phone call, that he will be arrested. It's callous. I think it's callous to put something like this in writing."

Murray said if residents living in the area of Maura's accident have been offended by people searching for his daughter, he is certainly sorry. "I have not tried to cause any problems," he said.

However, Murray believes the true intent of Williams' letter is police are trying to discourage any independent searches for Maura. He also believes it is an attempt to reduce the amount of publicity Maura's disappearance has been receiving. "We have all the interviews we have wanted to do," he said. "I think it's an overreaction on the part of the police department."

If people are upset because of the search for his daughter, though, Murray said he will personally apologize to them. It's much to do about nothing," he said. "We are not worried. We will continue to act responsibly and look for my daughter."

Williams, when contacted Tuesday, would not say when the complaints were filed nor would he divulge how many were submitted to the police department.

The past several weeks of police reports from his department have not indicated there were any trespassing complaints in the area of Maura's accident. Williams said none were noted because he didn't want the people's names known.

"They have been through enough," he said, referring to property owners. "If people are caught on people's properties they will be asked to leave. We will follow the law."

In addition to trespassing, he said people have been blocking vehicles in private driveways. As law enforcers, Williams said police are forced to protect property owners.

"If my daughter was missing, I wouldn't be happy until she was found," he said. "I understand their frustration. Hopefully, we will get to a successful conclusion where Maura is alive."

When asked if he would contact Los Angeles, Calif., psychic profiler Carla Baron regarding any information she may have regarding the case, Williams said, "We don't deal directly with psychics. We deal in evidence."

He did say, though, if she has information regarding Maura, his department will follow up on it.

Baron has claimed she believes Maura "is no longer with us" and may have fallen victim to someone who has killed other women. She also has information about the person's description, vehicle he drives and area where she may be found.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 62
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:41:07 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Nashua Telegraph / Caldeonian Record

April 15, 2004

Residents warn searchers

HAVERHILL (AP) - Family members of Maura Murray, a Massachusetts student who disappeared following a minor car accident in New Hampshire, have been warned by police that they could be arrested if they trespass on property surrounding the accident site.

Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams said in an April 2 letter to Murray’s father that his department has received a written request from area residents complaining about repeated trespassing and parking problems.

Williams said the property owners also are excluding friends and relatives of Maura Murray; volunteer searchers, canine handlers, private investigators, media, and others seeking clues or searching for her.

Murray, a 21-yearold Hanson, Mass., resident and junior at the U niversity of Massachusetts, disappeared after she was involved in a one-car accident the night of Feb. 9 on Route 112 in Haverhill.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 63
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:42:52 pm
Boston Globe

April 16, 2004

N.H. Police Consult Psychic on Missing Woman

By Peter DeMarco

New Hampshire State Police interviewed a California psychic yesterday who says she had visions of a man abducting Maura Murray, the Hanson native who disappeared in February after a minor car crash on a rural New Hampshire road.

Lieutenant John Scarinza, the lead investigator, said he spoke with psychic profiler Carla Baron and plans to talk to her again, but he did not share details of their conversation.

Baron, a nationally known psychic, told Fred Murray that she believes his daughter was abducted and killed. Baron said the visions indicated that Murray was buried near another woman abducted by the same man.

Scarinza said authorities would consider Baron's psychic visions as they would any other tip.

"Mr. Murray has asked us if we could listen to what this woman has to say. We're not close-minded to talking to anyone," he said.

Baron was profiled last night on ABC's "Primetime Thursday." She has aided numerous police departments in missing persons and homicide cases.

More than a dozen psychics have called New Hampshire State Police offering assistance with the Murray case, Scarinza said. But Murray's father has only asked police to speak with Baron.

Meanwhile, the police chief in Haverhill, N.H., where Maura Murray was last seen, has warned her family members that they could be arrested if they trespass on property surrounding the accident site, according to the Associated Press. Police Chief Jeff Williams said in an April 2 letter to Murray's father that his department has received a written request from area residents complaining about repeated trespassing and parking problems, the AP reported.

Murray's family believes that the 21-year-old woman, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was abducted by someone who offered her a ride just minutes before police responded to a 911 call about her car accident. Authorities have found no evidence of foul play and say they have been unable to determine where she was headed at the time of the accident. Investigators plan to conduct further aerial searches of the wooded area in Woodsville, N.H., where Murray crashed into a snowbank on Feb. 9, Scarinza said.

State Police and New Hampshire Fish and Game officials, along with a team of dogs, are preparing for another "line search" of the area in hopes of finding any of Murray's belongings, such as a backpack, that were apparently missing from her car, he said.

While similar searches have already been made, Scarinza said, "We don't want to leave anything to chance."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 64
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:44:46 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 20, 2004

Residents Dispute Claims They Want Trespassers Arrested

By Gary E. Lindsley

Haverhill, NH -- People living in the area near where a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst student went missing dispute police claims they filed complaints regarding the woman's father, relatives and searchers.

Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams sent a letter recently to Maura Murray's father, Fred, notifying him that anyone, including Fred, his family, friends, searchers and reporters, would face arrest if they continued trespassing on Haverhill residents' properties.

Maura was traveling east along Route 112 when her black 1996 Saturn failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve near The Weathered Barn the night of Feb. 9. She disappeared before police arrived and hasn't been seen since.

Steve Loud lives on Maguire Road, just west of The Weathered Barn. Claims the neighbors living near the accident site had gathered together to file complaints with Haverhill Police were not true, he said.

Chief Williams has refused to say when the complaints were filed as well as how many have been filed.

"The one neighbor wrote the letter saying it was all the neighbors," Loud said Monday. "It's just the people down by the barn."

He said he has told people at the Stage Coach Stop, a convenience store about a mile west of the accident site, to tell anyone wanting to look for Maura they could search his property.

"I said they can park on my land," Loud said. "I will do anything I can to help. We have been all around this hill. We didn't see any tracks."

Another neighbor, John Boutilier, also said he will do anything he can to help find Maura.

"I don't care if they come on our land," Boutilier said. "I don't have any problem with that. I think it's a most stressful situation for (Fred Murray)."

Searching people's properties, he said, certainly isn't going to hurt anyone. "It makes you wonder if someone has something to hide."

Ann Loud of Woodsville, who was visiting Steve Loud on Monday, said if she lived in the area, she would not complain about people searching for Maura.

"That's not how our community is," she said.

Faith Westman, who owns The Weathered Barn and lives across the road from it in a white house, did file a complaint with Haverhill Police about people parking their cars in the parking lot next to The Weathered Barn.

Westman said she also complained about people traipsing on her property.

"After two months, what are they looking for?" she asked. "Have we not covered enough? We really debated about saying something. We really can sympathize with the family."

Every time the police have parked near her barn or searched her property, she said, they have asked permission first to do so.

"The family has never consulted us," Westman said.

In talking about the night of the accident, she said she called it in to police.

Westman said she saw Butch Atwood, a school bus driver who lives about 100 yards east of the accident scene, stop and check on Maura.

She said she saw Maura get out of her vehicle and talk to Atwood. However, once she saw Atwood talking to Maura, she did not continue watching what was going on.

"We never suspected she would disappear," Westman said. "When the police came to our door and asked if she had come in, we were dumbfounded. I can't even imagine losing someone like that. There isn't any closure."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 65
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:46:38 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 20, 2004

State Police Conduct Second Air Search

By Gary E. Lindsley

Members of New Hampshire State Police Troop F were back in the air on Monday searching for Maura Murray.

Murray disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after being involved in a one-car crash on Route 112 in Haverhill, about one mile east of Swiftwater.

A state police helicopter, hovering at treetop level, battled stiff winds Monday as passengers Detective Todd Landry and Lt. Wayne Fortier searched the ground below them.

They slowly searched areas on both sides of Route 112. At times, it appeared the helicopter wasn't even moving as it hovered over a hilly area south of Murray's accident site.

School bus driver and nearby resident Butch Atwood was the last known person to see her alive. After the crash, he offered to call police and EMS for her, but he said she asked him not to.

He went to his house anyway to call for help. Between the time he went the 100 yards to his house and the time Haverill Police Department Sgt. Cecil Smith arrived, Murray had disappeared. She hasn't been seen since.

Her cell phone, bank account and credit cards have not been used since the accident.

Troop F Lt. John Scarinza said Monday the helicopter team was searching an area that has been searched previously, but which until now had been covered by snow. The team searched the river area and Bradley Hill Road areas as well as other side roads.

"We certainly wanted to take this opportunity since the snow was off the ground," Scarinza said.

He didn't know if the air search would continue today.

"It depends on how much area was covered," Scarinza said.

Flying at treetop level, investigators could see a lot of detail, he said, especially since the helicopter was flying so slow.

"It's time-consuming," Scarinza said, adding that investigators will search additional areas on foot. He didn't know when the ground search would be conducted, but believed it would be soon.

Not only state police, but also members of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department will be taking part in the ground search. Area fire departments may also be called in to help search.

Scarinza said investigators won't be asking for volunteers because the purpose of the search will be to locate any possible evidence.

Regarding psychic profiler Carla Baron, Scarinza said Troop F investigators have spoken to her about the Murray disappearance.

"We spoke with her several days before her TV special," he said, referring to the psychic's appearance on "Primetime" last week. "We in good faith did speak to her."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 66
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:48:30 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 21, 2004

Father Of Missing Sheldon Girl Worried About Others' Safety

By Gary E. Lindsley

Bruce Maitland is worried about the safety of teenage girls and young women in Vermont and New Hampshire - worried they may face the possibility of being kidnapped and transported elsewhere for illicit purposes.

Maitland's daughter, 17-year-old Brianna, disappeared after she left work at the Black Lantern in Montgomery the night of March 19.

"My own theory," Maitland said Tuesday night, "is there may be a market for these girls in the New York City area. I have some inclination of it."

He also believes there may be a connection between the disappearances of his daughter and that of Maura Murray, a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student from Hanson, Mass.

Murray disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

Brianna disappeared after she left work as a dishwasher at the Black Lantern. Her car was found during the early morning hours of March 20 with its rear end ensconced in a portion of an abandoned building, about a mile from the Black Lantern.

"I do believe there is some form of link," Maitland said.

He also said Vermont State Police investigators haven't ruled out a connection, although VSP and New Hampshire State Police investigators have officially told the media they don't believe there is any connection.

Maitland said state police are investigating the possibility teenage girls and young women are being taken for illegal purposes, such as prostitution in the New York City area.

He said there was a case of underage girls being used for such purposes recently in the Hampstead area.

"We know these guys are coming up from New York City," Maitland said. "It's very scary! The connection may not be with a random person. They could be part of a cell."

"In that case," he added, referring to both Brianna and Murray being alive, "there could be a glimmer of hope."

Maitland said he has spoken to detectives in the New York City area about his daughter. He also has visited police precincts there, including the Bronx. And pictures of his daughter have been distributed in the New York City area.

"They gave me some great confidence," he said. "They felt very strongly they would be able to find her if she is on the streets."

Maitland said someone in Burlington had been taking girls from the area to New York City for prostitution in the past.

"So, the market does exist," he said. "It certainly is a reason for the entire community to be upset and to be very careful about their daughters."

Maitland also spoke about a letter he and his wife, Kellie, had sent to Gov. Jim Douglas regarding their belief not enough was being done to find Brianna.

He faxed the letter to Douglas' office Friday.

"Yesterday we got a response," he said.

The Maitlands spent about two hours talking with VSP Tuesday.

"We were unhappy because we hadn't seen any results," he said.

The Maitlands also felt like they were being shut out by investigators. They weren't receiving any information about what was being done to find their daughter. Nor were they receiving any information on what had been learned.

After speaking with state police, Maitland said he believes investigators are desperately searching for evidence and clues that will lead them to Brianna.

"We got a real lesson in procedures," he said. "Certain mistakes were made. They wouldn't directly admit that."

However, he said certain other measures were taken to move the investigation forward which he and Kellie did not know about.

Although the Maitlands feel better coming out of Tuesday's meeting, they still aren't happy.

"I am not satisfied with the results," he said. "I want my daughter back."

The Maitlands will meet once a week with VSP to discuss the latest developments in the case.

Jason Gibbs, Douglas' press secretary, said the governor understands the family's concerns.

"He has been assured we are doing everything we can to bring this young woman home safely," Gibbs said. "The family has been briefed on what information can be shared and what can't be."

While wanting to keep the family informed, he said investigators don't want to provide information which will compromise the investigation.

People with information about Maitland should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 67
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:50:22 pm
The Providence Journal

April 22, 2004

State police to resume ground search for missing girl

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) - Another ground search is planned soon for a Massachusetts college student missing since Feb. 9 after she crashed her car.

State police Lt. John Scarinza said searchers will be out in the accident area in a few weeks before the leaves come out on trees, which makes sightings more difficult.

State police searched the area in a helicopter Monday for any sign of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., a University of Massachusetts student, who had packed up all her belongings at school before she disappeared.

Murray, who didn't tell her family or anyone at school where she was going, was driving east along Route 112 when she failed to make a sharp left hand curve. She was unhurt, but disappeared before police arrived and hasn't been seen or heard from since. Scarinza said the area leads into rugged, mountainous terrain that covers many miles.

Scarinza said state police have talked to Vermont State Police about a girl missing in Vermont to see if there might be a connection, but "based on what we know, there does not seem to be any correlation whatever."

Murray's family has spent considerable time searching the area and asking people in New Hampshire and bordering Vermont if they had seen her.

The woman's father, Fred Murray, still searches every weekend. "I'm happy the police are doing what they can," he said. He said the pledged reward money for information leading to her safe return has reached $40,000. He said he thinks she might have been abducted by someone who lives in the area. Scarinza said it is a possibility.

"Until we know the answer, I would never say that that's not possible, but ... there's no evidence to suggest that," he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 68
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:52:14 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 22, 2004

Letters To Editor

Something to hide?

To the Editor:

Just read the article regarding the Maura Murray family being warned about trespassing and being threatened with arrest.

Sounds to me like someone has something to hide and I am appalled that the police would buy into it. Especially as far as not letting the family know what property owners are going to charge them with trespassing, so they know where not to go.

That letter pretty much ends any type of investigation that might be done the way that it is worded. I have not been impressed with the overall response of the police and this just adds to it.

Robert S. Farnham

Alton Bay, N.H.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 69
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:54:06 pm
Boston Herald / The New Hampshire Union Leader / Unidentified / Nashua Telegraph

April 21/22, 2004

Notes: Unidentified newspaper has an alternative headline in italics.

New search for student finds nothing

Mystery <> UMass student has been missing since Feb. 9 car crash.

Witnesses say Maura Murray was involved in a traffic accident prior to her disappearance

HAVERHILL (AP) - Another search for a missing University of Massachusetts student has failed to turn up any sign of her whereabouts.

State police in a helicopter searched the Haverhill area on Monday. That’s where Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., was last seen the night of Feb. 9.

Lt. John Scarinza said the area had been searched before, but had been covered with snow. He said he did not know exactly when ground searchers would go back into the woods.

Murray’s family has spent considerable time searching the area and asking people in New Hampshire and bordering Vermont if they had seen her.

Murray, who didn’t tell her family or anyone at school where she was going, was driving east along Route 112 when she failed to make a sharp left hand curve near The Weathered Barn and crashed. She was unhurt, but disappeared before police arrived and hasn’t been seen or heard from since.

Her cell phone, bank account and credit cards have not been used since the accident.

Meanwhile, people living in the area disputed a police report that they had filed complaints about family and friends trespassing on their property while searching.

“The one neighbor wrote the letter saying it was all the neighbors,” said Steve Loud, who lives near The Weathered Barn. “I said they can park on my land,” Loud said. “I will do anything I can to help.” Another neighbor, John Boutilier, also said he will do anything he can to help find the woman. “I don’t care if they come on our land,” Boutilier said. “I don’t have any problem with that. I think it’s a most stressful situation for (Fred Murray).”

Faith Westman, who owns The Weathered Barn and lives across the road from it, filed a complaint with Haverhill police about people parking their cars in the parking lot next to the barn. She said she also complained about people walking on her property. “After two months, what are they looking for?” she said. “Have we not covered enough? We really debated about saying something. We really can sympathize with the family.”

Every time the police have parked near her barn or searched her property, they asked permission first, she said.

“The family has never consulted us,” Westman said.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 70
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:55:58 pm
The Caldedonian-Record

Tuesday, April 27, 2004

Missing Woman's Dad Urges Public's Help - Wants Aid Getting FBI Involved

By Gary E. Lindsley

Maura Murray's father wants people to become involved in his quest to have the FBI join the investigation into his daughter's disappearance.

Murray's father, Fred, and other relatives have long clamored for the FBI to play an expansive role in the search for Maura.

Maura disappeared after she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, about a mile east of Swiftwater, the night of Feb. 9.

She hasn't been seen since. And her ATM card, credit card, bank account and cell phone have not been used since her disappearance.

"I am asking for (people living in Vermont and New Hampshire) to contact the FBI and ask them to become involved," Murray said. "None of the young women in Vermont and New Hampshire are safe. This could happen again."

The discovery of a woman's body in a swampy area of Manchester, N.H., Saturday, Murray said, is even more reason to have the FBI involved.

Sgt. Nick Willard of the Manchester Police Department would not say Monday whether the woman has been identified.

Willard said the woman's identity will be released once the next of kin have been identified.

He said the New Hampshire State Attorney General's Office will be having a press conference today regarding the discovery of the woman. Members of the Attorney General's Office could not be reached for comment Monday afternoon. Murray is concerned about a Vermont woman's disappearance as well.

Brianna Maitland is a 17-year-old who disappeared the night of March 19 after leaving her job at the Black Lantern in Montgomery.

Murray, like Brianna's father, Bruce, does not understand how state police in both states have ruled out any connection between the disappearance of their daughters.

"They said the victims did not know one another," Murray said. "I told them the connection isn't between the victims, but the perpetrator. I asked (New Hampshire State Police) why not let the FBI decide whether there is a connection. Also, there may be an Upper Valley murders connection." He was referring to a series of murders which occurred in the late 1980s.

"They said they have all the resources they need," Murray said, referring to state police. "I told them they are not getting the job done. They said they are. And I said they weren't because they have not found Maura." Murray has suggested the state police conduct a search of areas off of Route 112 on Route 116.

"I asked them to do a direct appeal to the public," he said. "They said they will wait until May." Murray told them that wasn't acceptable. Waiting another month will make it more than three months since Maura disappeared.

"I would think people other than the Maitlands and us would be screaming for the FBI," he said. "We don't want to wait for another body to disappear. There's an unidentified guy still out there. You have another potential horrendous situation."

Murray also is asking for help from residents living in the area where his daughter's accident happened to become involved because he believes a local person may have been involved in Maura's disappearance. "Like it takes a thief to catch a thief, it takes a local to catch a local," he said.

A $40,000 reward is being offered for any information leading to finding Maura. Maura's Web site is http://www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.

The Maitlands have announced they are offering a $10,000 reward for finding their daughter.

The Maitlands have created the Web site http://www.bringbrihome.org as a way to help find their daughter.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 71
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:57:50 pm
The Caledonian-Record

April 30, 2004

Ceremony Planned For Murray Accident Site Public Urged To Attend

By Gary E. Lindsley

Family and friends of missing University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray will hold a special Circle of Hope ceremony simultaneously throughout parts of the country at 1 p.m., Sunday.

Murray, who is from Hanson, Mass., has been missing since she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9.

Her father, Fred, will be joined by Jennifer Henry of Essex, Vt., and Leslie Grima of Franconia, N.H., for a ceremony at the accident site Sunday.

Simultaneous ceremonies will be held by Maura's boyfriend, Billy Rausch, in Lawton, Okla.; Rausch's parents, Bill and Sharon, in Marengo, Ohio; friends and family in Hanson; friends at UMass at Amherst; and by her sister, Julie, in Fort Bragg, N.C.

Twenty-two blue balloons, signifying Maura's 22nd birthday Tuesday, will be released at each site.

There also will be blue ribbons, buttons and a large laminated photograph of Maura.

Sharon Rausch said blue ribbons and balloons are being used because blue is Maura's favorite color.

At the accident site, there will be a large laminated photo of Maura. And Henry hopes to tie a blue ribbon around the tree where Maura had her accident.

Maura left her Amherst dorm the afternoon of Feb. 9, driving a black 1996 Saturn, which Rausch said was not operating on all of its cylinders.

As Maura rounded a sharp left-hand curve past The Weathered Barn in the town of Haverhill, she lost control of her car and went off the right side of the highway into some trees, causing minor damage.

Butch Atwood, a school bus driver, was returning home from taking students on a skiing trip when he spotted Murray's car.

He offered her assistance and said he would call police and emergency medical services for her, but she asked him not to.

Atwood, who lived about 100 yards east of the accident site, said Maura did not appear intoxicated.

He drove up to his house to call police and EMS. Between the seven to nine minutes he left Maura and Haverhill Police Sgt. Cecil Smith arrived, Maura disappeared. She has not been seen nor heard from since.

May 9 will mark three months since Maura disappeared.

Her father said he will be releasing the blue balloons and "hope for the best."

He said the balloon casting and Circle of Hope ceremony is going to be symbolic. He is hoping others, including area residents, join him for the ceremony.

However, he also is asking people not to park in the driveway of The Weathered Barn nor people's driveways.

The Rev. Lyn McIntosh will be leading the Circle of Hope ceremony at the accident site.

Grima said she has become involved in the ceremony and search because she is a nurse.

"It's just something I believe in," she said, referring to the search for Maura. "I think it's awful things aren't happening quicker."

Her sister, Jennifer Henry, also is a nurse.

Henry will be bringing ribbons not only symbolic of Maura, but also of Brianna Maitland, 17, Sheldon, Vt., who disappeared after her own car accident in Montgomery, Vt., the night of March 19.

Henry also has been involved in trying to help find Maura. She laments the fact she disappeared so far from home.

"If one of my children went missing in another town, I wouldn't have the hometown advantage ... support," she said.

She noted how hundreds of people have come out to help search for Brianna, which has not been the case for Maura.

"We want to get the local people involved," Henry said.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 72
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 01:59:42 pm
Seventeen Magazine

About May 2004

Girl Still Missing One cold winter night, Maura, 21, just picked up and left her college campus-and vanished without a trace.

Route 112 near Haverhill, New Hampshire, has lots of twists and turns, but none are quite as wicked as the 90-degree swerve across from the Weathered Barn, a dilapidated former antiques store.

And at 7:30 P.M. on February 9, 2004, Maura Murray, 21, found out just how difficult it can be to navigate that tum when she completely missed it.

Maura's '96 Saturn careened off the road into the woods, barely missing a tree. She was fine. The car wasn't. The radiator was damaged, and the wheels sank into a few feet of packed snow. About five minutes later, a school bus drove by. Butch Atwood, the driver, was off-duty and headed to his cabin just up the road. "Are you okay?" he shouted to Maura in her car. "Should I call AAA?" Maura rolled down her window and shivered from the 12-degree chill. She mumbled that she'd already called AAA for a tow. Atwood thought she seemed like she'd been drinking. "Okay," he said, "I'll call the police and fire department. Why don't you come to my house? You can get warm and wait there."

"No," Maura replied firmly, "I'll wait here."

Atwood thought it was pouible that Maura might have been scared of him-he weighs 350 pounds and has a grizzled beard -so he didn't press the point.

Instead, he drove the 100 yards to his cabin and called the police himself. About 15 minutes later, Atwood saw the police pull up to Maura's car.

When they looked inside, they found an open can of Skyy Blue malt liquor in the front seat. In the back was a suitcase filled with clothes; a stuffed monkey and a diamond necklace that her boyfriend, Bill Rausch, had given to her; two textbooks; and another book-Not Without Peril, an account of people who died climbing New Hampshire's Mount Washington, bookmarked at a chapter titled ''A Question of Life or Death."

But Maura was nowhere in sight.

TAKING OFF

No one knows where Maura was going three hours earlier when she got into her car at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where she was a junior studying nursing. She didn't tell her friends, her family, or her boyfriend that she was leaving campus at all.

The only thing she said to Bill, in an e-mail she'd sent at 1 P.M. that day (after she'd failed to return his two phone calls and an e-mail he sent the previous day) was, "i love you more stud. i got your messages, but honestly, i didn't feel like talking to much of anyone, i promise to call today though. Love you." Four hours after she e-mailed Bill, Maura did write a note to her boss at the campus art gallery before she took off.

In it, she said that she had a family emergency and had to go out of town for a week. According to the police report, she had also checked out information about Stowe Mountain and printed out directions to Burlington, Vermont (which is in the opposite direction from where she'd crashed). Then she packed her stuff, left her dorm, took $280 out of an ATM, bought a can of Skyy Blue and a bottle of red wine at a liquor store, got in her car-and started driving.

EARLY WARNING

Maura had always seemed like she had it all together. She was ranked fourth in her high school class (she scored a 1420 on her SAT), and enrolled at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Then, in fall 2003, Maura transferred to UMass Amherst because she decided she'd rather heal people than kill them, says her father, Fred Murray.

Maura had always shown athletic prowess too, and in high school her reputation as a star runner (she ran a five-minute mile) was known throughout Massachusetts.

But when Maura didn't win a race, which was rare, she'd get really quiet. Even though you could tell she was beating herself up inside for not winning, if you asked her whether she was upset, she'd shake her head no. Maura was like that: She kept things to herself and few people ever saw her cry.

That is, until a few days before she disappeared. Four days earlier, on Thursday, February 5, Maura had called her older sister Kathleen, 26, at around 10:20 P.M., during a quiet patch at Maura's second job manning a dorm security desk. "I was telling her all about this fight I'd had with my fiance'," says Kathleen. "Maura kept saying, 'Don't worry, he's a good guy. It'll work out." After they got off the phone, Maura was sitting at her desk doing her job. Then, according to police reports, she inexplicably burst into tears in front of a coworker-and wouldn't say why.

ANOTHER OUTBURST

Two days later, on Saturday, February 7, Maura's dad drove up to Amherst to help Maura buy a new car.

Maura and her father spent the day at car dealerships and then hit the Amherst Brewing Company for grilled chicken salads. At 10 P.M. her dad wanted to call it a night, so he had Maura drop him off at his motel, then drive herself to the dorm in his car.

About an hour later, Maura arrived at her friend Sara Alfieri's dorm room to hang out. For the next three hours, Maura, Sara, and a couple of friends sat around talking and listening to music while drinking Skyy Blue malt mixed with a little bit of wine. A couple of times, when there were pauses in the conversation, Maura mentioned that she wanted to return the car to her dad that night. "It didn't make any sense," says Kate Markopolous, who was there. Why would Maura, who'd had a few drinks and seemed tired, go to the trouble of driving all the way to her dad's motel in the middle of the night, when she didn't need to?

At 2:30 A.M., Maura left Sara's room, telling everyone she was going to go upstairs to her room. But instead, she got in her dad's car and started driving back to his motel. On the highway, the car jumped a sandy embankment and hit a guardrail. The front of the car's radiator crumpled, so Maura called AAA to tow the car. The police arrived and wrote up a report-but didn't give Maura a ticket.

When Maura told her father about the accident the next morning, he was upset. "The first thing I asked was, 'Are you all right?'" he says. As Fred Murray called garages, Maura sat there crying. "She kept repeating 'I'm sorry' over and over," he says. "I think she felt like she had really let me down." At 2 P.M., Murray dropped a still-teary Maura off at her dorm in a rental car. "I said, 'Maura, it will get fixed. Don't worry,'" he says. Then Maura got out, and her dad drove away.

DESPERATE SEARCH

The next day, on February 9, the New Hampshire police arrived at the scene of Maura's second accident-the one on Route 112. The police, fire department, and local residents searched area roads for her. They also left a message for the Murray family to let them know that there had been an accident. When Maura didn't turn up the next day, the police called again and told them she was missing.

Fred Murray drove up to New Hampshire and got a room at the Wells River Motel, near the accident site. As the police continued their search, Murray, along with the rest of his family and Maura's boyfriend, combed the area too. "I can't explain how it feels to be walking up an embankment, thigh-deep in snow, and then there's a big hill in front of you, and you have to walk up it because you see footprints in the snow and you might find your sister's body at the end," says Kathleen.

Two days after Maura's disappearance, dogs had tracked her scent to the road, about 100 yards away from the site. Her family thought that maybe someone had picked Maura up, so they printed up 15,000 flyers with her picture, and a crew of volunteers began tacking them to every signpost and gas station within 50 miles. But weeks went by, and no one came forward. So the Murrays are still searching for Maura.

QUESTIONS REMAIN

There is still no sign of Maura. "The only thing that makes sense is that a bad guy got her," says her dad.

But police disagree. "There is no evidence that she was abducted," says New Hampshire State Police Sergeant Thomas Yorke. Police have told newspapers that they suspect Maura intended to kill herself, but they've reached no conclusions. "As far as we're concerned, she's a missing person," says Yorke.

Maura's crying, along with her atypical drinking (her family and friends say she wasn't a drinker) and the two car accidents just before she disappeared, raises the question of whether she was buckling under some emotional pain. "I don't know what could have been going on that she didn't tell me about," says Bill. "As far as I knew, everything was fine."

"I may go to my grave never knowing where she's gone or even why she left school," says her father. "And as far as I can tell, no one else knows either."

Caption: Fred Murray printed "missing" flyers. They were posted as far away as Florida.

Caption: On February 9, 2004 year Maura crashed her car while driving along route 112.

Caption: Maura with her boyfriend Bill, in 2003.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 73
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:01:35 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

May 2, 2004

Missing: the story in NH

By Pat Hammond

There are scores of New Hampshire folks reported as missing right now. The ages and the reasons will vary, of course. And so will the outcomes.

The missing have received considerable attention in the wake of the disappearance -- and grim discovery -- of Amie Lynn Riley. The 20-year-old Manchester woman was found dead last week and her mother is trying to bring about changes when it comes to missing adults.

John Healy knows something about missing people. He owns and operates Litigation Intelligence Services, LLC, in Warner. A Certified Master Investigator, Healy retired from the New Hampshire state police at the rank of lieutenant.

"People go missing for a variety of reasons," Healy said. "Police involvement in these things is limited only due to the fact of the sheer volume of missing persons reported regularly. They just do not have the resources to fully investigate each case.

"Missing could mean a runaway teen, an adult who has disappeared, a kidnap victim, etc. There are lots of definitions and reasons. I think this is an area that is covered by a generic term and that is the problem," Healy said. "It is not a generic happening.

"People may be missing against their will, they may be lying low on purpose (such as deadbeat dads), or they may have just lost contact due to the passage of time," Healy said.

But sometimes the case is solved with the discovery of a corpse.

"I was recently asked to work on a missing person case on the Seacoast," Healy said. "I was going to peruse the bills and data left behind as well as the computer hard drive.

"The day I was headed over there," Healy said, "his body was found, close to his home, an accidental death."

The NCIC protocol

If Amie Lynn Riley's name had been entered into the FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database immediately after her mother reported her missing last August, that would not have altered the tragic ending of her short life, but her name would have been in a national database in the event that her body had been found in a place far away from New Hampshire.

Charlotte Riley of Chester is channeling her grief over her daughter's death into a mission to require police who process missing persons cases to enter the names into the nationwide database within a "reasonable period of time."

"I want a mandatory timeframe for entry of the names into the NCIC file," Mrs. Riley said yesterday. "It must be within a reasonable amount of time and, for me, that would be one week, not three months."

It was three months before the Manchester Police Department entered Amie's name into the NCIC. Amie's body was found a week ago -- eight months after her disappearance -- and her death has been pronounced a homicide.

Different for adults

"The general public feels that when someone goes missing you go to the police and report the person missing and can use NCIC, but that is only true if the person is a juvenile.

"If the missing person is an adult," Mrs. Riley said, "it is up to the person at the police department in coordination with the state police to decide if the person is really missing."

Federal law requires that missing persons meeting any of the following criteria must be entered into the NCIC system. The criteria cover any person of any age who is missing and:

has a physical or mental disability or is senile, subjecting himself or others to immediate danger

the disappearance was not voluntary

the person's physical safety may be in danger

the disappearance came after a catastrophe.

Erin Bruno is the case manager for the Nation's Missing Children Organization & Center for Missing Adults (NMCO), based in Phoenix. She has provided support to Charlotte Riley during the family's months-long ordeal.

99 in New Hampshire

"The most current statistics that we have are from 3/07/04 from the FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database," Bruno told the Sunday News in an e-mail last week. "There were 46,315 active cases of missing persons over the age of 18 nationally and 99 active missing person cases of all ages in New Hampshire.

"The national number has been pretty stable over the past three months with a fluctuation of less than 300 people," Bruno said. "In February 2004 there were 12,510 cases of missing adults that were entered into the system and 13,827 cases that were canceled. The total canceled reflects newly entered cases and previously entered cases."

An FBI-NCIC source said that as of April 1 there were 45,980 active adult files. Of that, 24,443 are male, 21,534 female and there are three cases in which the gender is unknown.

Federal funding

A non-profit agency providing nationwide assistance to law enforcement and families of missing persons, NMCO was formed in 1994 to provide search and advocacy services to children. In 1995 it expanded its charter to include services to missing persons over the age of 18.

The U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance granted the agency $1.57 million in 2002 to establish the first national clearinghouse for missing adults, providing services and advocacy to families of missing persons.

"Currently there is not a law that requires law enforcement to take a report on a missing adult, so there is no guarantee the (local) police department would be able to open a missing person investigation," Bruno said.

Two missing-person cases have stumped New Hampshire authorities in recent years: Tina and Bethany Sinclair of Chesterfield and Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass.

Tina Sinclair, then 34, and her daughter Bethany, 15, were last seen in February 2001 in the Chesterfield home of convicted sex offender Eugene Van Bowman, where they had been living.

Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, withdrew money from an ATM on Feb. 9, 2004, and e-mailed a professor that she wouldn't be in class all week because of a family problem. Around 7 p.m. she crashed her car into a snowbank on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., several miles from the Vermont border.

Police said a witness offered help but she refused and told the witness not to call police. Searches have proved unsuccessful.

It's not illegal

State police Sgt. Robert Estabrook is with the Major Crime Unit. "I get a list of missing persons periodically from NCIC," he said on Friday. "As of today, there are 56 missing (New Hampshire) people of all ages in our file. Our stats are probably more up-to-date than what NCIC has.

"It's not illegal for an adult to be missing," Estabrook said, "if they want to be. We are a clearinghouse for that. We send out a letter and a form after 30 days to the local police department to ask if the person is still missing. The police department checks off choices, such as 'the person has returned,' on a form and returns it to us."

"If the case is still active after 30 days," Estabrook said, "we would request dental records." Estabrook's office continues to communicate with the police department from time to time to make sure files reflect current information.

The 56 file cards include people missing from as long ago as 1978 but most disappeared within the last two years.

Asking questions

"Police officers are trained to ask specific questions with regard to a disappearance and are searching for indications that there might be foul play," Manchester Police Department spokesman Sgt. Mark Fowke said.

But some people choose to disappear, Fowke said. "As adults, we are free to come and go as we please. In an interview we ask if there is any reason why they should have run off. People do turn up."

Fowke scanned recent missing persons files on Friday and said, "There was one suicide but the majority of the ones I looked at were brought to a conclusion where we located an individual."

Outcomes unclear

Bruno, of the Nation's Missing Children Organization & Center for Missing Adults, said statistics on the outcomes of missing persons cases are "still a little ways off because we are still very young as the national clearinghouse and the numbers don't actually reflect the total population yet."

Charlotte Riley will be pursuing her crusade to change the NCIC rules on both the state and the national level.

"If it takes the loss of my daughter to do this," Riley said, referring to requiring police to enter the name of a missing person into the NCIC within a reasonable time period, "and me to be an advocate, then this is my mission in life.

"How can we fix it?" Mrs. Riley asks herself. "Is it going to be more work for the police? Yes, it's more paperwork, but we're not talking about pet seals, we are talking about real people."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 74
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:03:26 pm
Boston Globe

May 3, 2004

Circle of Hope - Story in Caption

By Justine Hunt

Friends and family of Maura Murray gathered at the track at Whitman-Hanson High School yesterday to release balloons for Murray, who has been missing since Feb. 9 after a car accident. Globe Staff Photo / Justine Hunt
Title: Newspaper Articles # 75
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:05:19 pm
The Patriot Ledger

May 3, 2004

Missing 3 months and still no clues: Hanson woman's kin, friends gather

By Chris Nelson

HANSON - Three months after Hanson native Maura Murray vanished in northern New Hampshire, friends and family say they are upset by lack of progress in the case.

The University of Massachusetts-Amherst student vanished after crashing her car on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

Yesterday, friends and family gathered at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School for what they termed a ‘‘circle of hope'' ceremony to rekindle interest in the case.

Other ceremonies were held yesterday at the spot in New Hampshire where Murray vanished after crashing her car, at UMass-Amherst and at military bases in Oklahoma and North Carolina, where her boyfriend and sister are stationed.

At the high school from which Murray graduated in 2000, 75 people crowded into a semicircle around a large, framed portrait of her. Seated to the right of the picture was her grandmother, Ruth Mehrman.

The ceremony was held at the school's track, because Murray was a star athlete.

‘‘It's only fitting to gather on the same track where Maura and her friends spent hours training and running,'' said event organizer Beth Drewniak, mother of Liz Drewniak, 22, a close friend of the missing student.

‘‘I think those of you who know Maura know her giggle, her beautiful smile and, oh, those dimples to die for,'' she said.

Murray's 22nd birthday was Tuesday.

Friends and family said yesterday they are disturbed that there has been no progress on the New Hampshire State Police investigation.

‘‘It seems like the New Hampshire police don't do a ... lot of anything about the investigation,'' said family friend Beverly Kelley.

Kelley, 59, works with Murray's mother, Laurie Murray, at the Samuel Marcus Nursing and Retirement Home in Weymouth.

Maura Murray packed up her belongings in her dorm room on Feb. 9, loaded up her car and abruptly left UMass. She wrecked her car later that night but refused help from a passing motorist. Ten minutes later, police arrived, but Murray was gone.

Blue and pink balloons that were passed out to everyone at yesterday's event were released into the wind at the ceremony's conclusion. They headed north, in the direction of New Hampshire.

Speakers included Tom Zamagni, Murray's seventh- and eight-grade basketball coach, and the Rev. Mark Hannon, pastor of St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church, where Murray was involved in church activities.

After the service, Laurie Murray reflected on her daughter's disappearance. ‘‘It makes no sense. It's like she just, poof, - vanished,'' she said. ‘‘How is that possible? There's not a trace of her.''

She said New Hampshire State Police periodically follow new leads, but there has been no good news to report. ‘‘When I talk to the investigators, they always have leads and follow them, but they always end in a dead-end. It's been almost three months, and I just want my daughter to come home.''
Title: Newspaper Articles # 76
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:07:11 pm
The Caledonian-Record

May 4, 2004

Circle Of Hope Ceremony For Murray Draws People

By Gary E. Lindsley

Fred Murray couldn't help but dab at his eyes as Israel Kamakawiwo'ole's version of "Somewhere Over The Rainbow" enveloped the 20 people gathered for his daughter's Circle of Hope ceremony, Sunday afternoon.

With strong winds and sometimes stormy-looking skies portending rain, people from New Hampshire, Vermont and Massachusetts gathered at the site on Route 112 where Maura lost control of her black 1996 Saturn the night of Feb. 9 and then disappeared.

"I was overwhelmed," Murray said, clearing his voice. "That song ... I have never heard it before ... it was Maura. That song ... it tore me up."

Maura's friends from her high school days at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School -- they and Maura were referred to as the "gang of seven" -- wanted the song to be played at the Circle of Hope Ceremony.

Not only was the song played in Haverhill Sunday, it also was played during Circles of Hope ceremonies for Maura in Oklahoma, South Dakota, Ohio, North Carolina and Massachusetts.

The ceremonies were held so that people could gather together to not only let Maura know they are still hoping for her safe return, but also to wish her a happy 22nd birthday.

Each person at the Haverhill site was given one of 22 blue balloons before letting go with a birthday wish for Maura. Blue is Maura's favorite color. She turns 22 today.

As the strong winds scattered the balloons, Murray said they were like the people who care about his daughter. The balloons represent all those people searching for her.

He said no matter what has happened he wants Maura to come home so he can help her work things out.

"Happy birthday and we will see you soon," Murray said, letting go of a blue balloon.

He also thanked the 20 people who attended the Haverhill ceremony.

Not only was Murray overwhelmed by the song, he also was overwhelmed by the number of people who attended the Circle of Hope.

"I thought maybe I would be out here by myself," he said. "To get a nice turnout like this made me feel very grateful. It shows the inherent good in people.

"It shows everyone is concerned and wants to help, but they are frustrated."

Diane Brock, who owns the Wells River Motel in Vermont where Murray and other relatives have been staying, said she wanted to show her support for the family.

"I feel like I have become a part of their family," Brock said. "I feel their pain. I have three children Maura's age. I would be doing the same thing he has ... night and day."

Murray has been spending every weekend searching for Maura.

Barbara McDougall from Weymouth, Mass., said she also wanted to support Murray. "I also wanted to wish Maura a happy birthday." She also has been searching for Maura.

This weekend was the first chance for McDougall's husband, David, to help join in the search. He has a very personal reason why he wants to help Murray bring his daughter home. "My brother went missing in 1998," David McDougall said. "He was missing 17 days." Family members found him.

"So, I know how they feel," he said. "So, we will keep coming back until something changes."

The Rev. Lyn McIntosh led the Circle of Hope ceremony. McIntosh said it is hard to have a Circle of Hope when someone is missing.

However, she added, while everyone joined hands in a circle, "She is here in our hearts, our minds and our imaginations. "I pray you never give up," McIntosh said, turning to Murray. "Not a chance," he said.

Jennifer Henry, who is from Essex, Vt., made the trip to Haverhill with her children. She helped attach a laminated photo of Maura to the tree and also tied a blue ribbon and bow around it.

Her daughter, Angela, said she felt great seeing how many people turned out for the Circle of Hope. She was pleased with the show of support for Murray and his family.

Everyone attending the ceremony was especially touched when Patti Davidson from Weymouth, Mass., read a poem she had written for Maura, who is a distant relative.

Davidson urged God to keep Maura close in his arms and to bring her home so she is no longer alone. "I kept thinking about her," she said. "This came from my heart. I hope she hears it and I hope she comes home."

At the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School track in Hanson, Mass., about 100 people turned out in support of Maura and her family.

Beth Drewniak, who knows Maura very well, said it was a great turnout. Drewniak used to celebrate her daughter Liz's and Maura's birthdays together because they were within days of one another.

Of the "gang of seven," she said three were at the event.

"When I was growing up, if I had had a group of friends like this, I would have been thankful," Drewniak said. "They are so respectful of one another. They are absolutely heartbroken,"

The Circle of Hope was held at the high school's track, according to Drewniak, because Maura used to spend "weeks and weeks and months and months there."

Regarding the song, she said her daughter and Maura's other friends were adamant it was played during the ceremonies throughout the country.

Drewniak said the song reminded the friends of Maura. "It was just a reminder Maura is still out there and people love her and we will keep trying to bring her home," Liz Drewniak said, referring to the Circle of Hope gatherings. "All of us ... we have good days and we have bad days. We can sense when we need an extra phone call."

"It's been a bad semester," said Liz Drewniak, who is Maura's best friend. "It was emotional. We were in tears most of the time."

When asked what message she would like to send Maura, Drewniak said, "Maura, we want you home."

Sharon Rausch, who is the mother of Maura's boyfriend, said the ceremony in Marengo, Ohio, also was very emotional and was attended by about 20 people. "We joined hands and every person said something," Rausch said. "By the time everyone finished, tears were streaming down our faces."

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 77
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:09:03 pm
Daily Collegian

May 4, 2004

Maura Murray’s Mother Believes Daughter May be Victim of Kidnaping

By Elizabeth Joyce-Brandt

AMHERST — The mother of a University of Massachusetts nursing student still missing after nearly three months suspects foul play in the disappearance of her daughter.

Laurie Murray, mother of the missing student, Maura Murray, said she fears that her daughter has been kidnapped.

“Maura was abducted,” Murray said. “She is not a runaway, she would not do this to her family.”

Maura Murray, a junior and Hanson native, drove to New Hampshire on Feb. 9, after telling her teachers she would be gone for a week due to a death in the family. While driving east along Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., Murray failed to make a sharp left hand curve near The Weathered Barn, which resulted in a single-car accident. A passerby, Butch Atwood, stopped to see if she needed him to call the police. Atwood told police that Murray refused.

According to police, Murray disappeared before they arrived. They found her car locked with her clothing inside. Her cell phone and credit cards have not been used since her disappearance.

“My thinking is that when she had her car accident up in Haverhill, she was walking up the road and she took a ride, she had to have… the [police] dog stopped in the middle of the road with her scent,” said Murray. “She had to get into someone’s vehicle. There were no footprints on either side of the road. She got into a vehicle, with the wrong person. You know, she could’ve been suffering from a head injury, her windshield was broken… she could’ve had trauma, amnesia.”

Although police say they have no evidence of foul play, they have not ruled it out. “Anything’s possible,” said Sgt. Thomas Yorke of the Troop F Barracks in Twin Mountain, N.H. Yorke said he believes that Murray had some type of plan.

“We are dealing with facts. She packed up her room…. she obviously had something on her mind,” he said. “Maybe she went to visit someone and that got interrupted.” Yorke also said there is some possibility that Murray may not want to be found.

“She may have just gone out on her own. She’s 21, she can be her own person,” Yorke said. “She may not want to be found, we’ll respect that. We just want to know so we can put people at ease.”

Police are currently following up on tips that they have received.

“[There are] different things that detectives are working on, though nothing is earth-shattering,” Yorke said. “Just miscellaneous tips, things like ‘I saw her the next day.'”

The search has been focused in the New Hampshire area. A helicopter search found nothing last week. Another ground search will be conducted sometime this week with help from area fire departments and Fish and Game officials. Vermont authorities are aware of Murray’s disappearance and her close friends have contacted Canadian authorities, according to Murray.

“Considering there is a very limited force up there [in New Hampshire], they are doing the best they can,” Murray said “There are only three or four of them [officers] to cover a large area, so I can’t say that they are [doing enough to find Maura].”

When questioned, Murray denied that the family recruited psychics to aid in Maura’s search.

“Actually, that was false information,” Murray said. “Any psychic who went up there, did it on their own, there was no one hired.”

Murray said she doesn’t believe in psychics and believes that her daughter is coming home. Police said they have no evidence to believe that Maura Murray is dead. “We are still hopeful that she’s found safe and alive. We have no evidence to dictate otherwise,” Yorke said.

Laurie Murray remains hopeful that her daughter will return home.

“She’s very bubbly, well liked, everybody loves her,” she said. “Everyone is praying, all over the world. We’ll never give up hope. We just want her home safe.”

On Sunday, May 2, a circle of hope vigil was held at the Hanson-Whitman high school track, in a community that has been very supportive to the Murray search. Circles of hope will also be conducted in Ohio, where the parents of Murray’s boyfriend live, and in North Carolina, where her sister, Julie, is living.

Maura’s 22nd birthday was yesterday and with Mother’s Day on Sunday, Laurie Murray said day-to-day coping is very hard.

“I will never give up hope,” she said. “I have my ups and downs, but I have to be strong for her.”

Anyone with information on the whereabouts of Maura Murray should contact the New Hampshire State Police at (603) 271-3636.

Copyright © Daily Collegian
Title: Newspaper Articles # 78
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:10:55 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader / North Adams Transcript / Portsmouth Herald / St. Albans Daily Messenger

May 5/6, 2004

Note: The Portsmouth Herald has an alternative headline and additional paragraphs in Italics.

Parents of missing young women will meet

Parents of missing women to meet in N.H.

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — The parents of a missing Sheldon teen will meet this weekend in New Hampshire with the father of a young Massachusetts woman who recently vanished to discuss whether their daughters’ disappearances are related.

“We’d really like it if someone would come in and look at both situations and see if a single suspect might have been involved,” said Bruce Maitland of East Franklin, father of 17-year-old Brianna Maitland.

Bruce Maitland, his wife, Kelly, and Fred Murray of Hanson, Mass., will meet in Woodsville a few miles north of where Murray’s 21-year-old daughter, Maura, disappeared in early February.

Maura Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts, vanished shortly after her car went off Route 112 in Woodsville the night of Feb. 9. Woodsville is across the Connecticut River from Wells River.

Brianna Maitland disappeared after finishing work at the Black Lantern Inn restaurant in Montgomery the night of March 19. Her car was found a mile west of town the next day, its rear end rammed into the side of an abandoned house on Vermont 118.

Police in both states have discounted the possibility that the two disappearances are related.

“We have looked at that and talked with the New Hampshire State Police about both cases,” said Lt. Tom Nelson of the Vermont State Police. “We have not found anything that connects the cases in anyway."

Maitland said police should continue to explore possible links, and said Saturday’s event will help keep the spotlight on the two cases.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 79
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:12:47 pm
The Caldedonian-Record

Thursday, May 6, 2004

Parents Of Missing Women To Meet

By Gary E. Lindsley

The parents of 17-year-old Brianna Maitland and 21-year-old Maura Murray are joining forces to increase pressure on law enforcement to call in the FBI to join the search for their loved ones.

Bruce and Kellie Maitland and Fred Murray have scheduled a press conference for 9 a.m. Saturday at the American Legion in Woodsville.

The Maitlands and Murray are frustrated with the respective police investigations into their daughters' disappearances.

Brianna has been missing since she clocked out at her job as a dishwasher at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, Vt., at 11:20 p.m. March 19. She left the inn to return to Sheldon where she was living with a friend.

Her car was discovered partially ensconced in an abandoned building during the early morning hours of March 20 about a mile from the Black Lantern. She hasn't been seen since.

Maura was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9. She hasn't been seen since the night of the accident. Both women disappeared after being involved in accidents on rural roads.

The Maitlands and Murray believe there may be a connection between what has happened to their daughters. And they want that connection explored.

However, state police from Vermont and New Hampshire have discounted any connection between the disappearances of Brianna and Maura.

"We want to meet Fred and talk about what we are going through," Bruce Maitland said. "Also, we want to get out to people we need to have this looked at as a combined effort. There may be a connection."

He believes the FBI, which has more resources than the state police, should become involved in the search for Brianna and Maura.

Murray has been asking New Hampshire State Police right from the beginning to ask the FBI to become active participants in the search for his daughter.

And with Brianna missing, he believes it is imperative any possible connections be explored. "I believe there may be a connection," Murray said. "The people in Vermont and New Hampshire should be screaming to have the FBI become involved."

He said until Brianna and Maura are found, young women in Vermont and New Hampshire are not safe until whomever is involved is found.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 80
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:14:39 pm
The Caledonian-Record

May 6, 2004

Police Have New Lead In Maura Murray Case

By Gary E. Lindsley

There may be a break in the case involving 21-year-old nursing student Maura Murray who disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after she was involved in a one-car accident on rural Route 112 in Haverhill.

New Hampshire State Police Troop F Lt. John Scarinza said a witness has come forward with information he may have seen Murray about four to five miles east of the accident scene.

Scarinza said a man, whom he declined to identify, was returning from a construction job in the Franconia area when he spotted a young woman matching Murray's description hurrying east on Route 112, about an hour after her accident.

He not only believes the witness' information is credible, he also believes the man actually saw the Hanson, Mass., resident.

Murray, a student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, left campus the afternoon of Feb. 9 after e-mailing professors and her boss, telling them she was going to take a week off because of a family problem.

Before heading north, she packed her black 1996 Saturn with some clothing, books for her college classes, expensive diamond jewelry from her boyfriend, Billy Rausch of Fort Sill, Okla., and computer-generated directions for locations in Vermont.

Although directions found in her car indicated she may have been headed toward Stowe or Burlington in Vermont, Murray apparently exited Interstate 91 at Exit 17 and headed east on Route 302.

She then turned right onto Route 112 and apparently headed to Lincoln, which she was familiar with because of family excursions to the area.

About a mile east of Swiftwater, around 7 p.m., she lost control of her car while rounding a sharp left-hand curve near The Weathered Barn. Her car went off the right side of the highway and into some trees, causing minor damage.

Butch Atwood, a school bus driver who lives about 100 yards east of the accident site, discovered Murray's disabled car while returning from taking students on a skiing trip.

Atwood spoke with her and offered to help, including calling police and EMS. However, Murray insisted that Atwood not call police and EMS because she had already contacted AAA.

Murray did not appear to be intoxicated, according to Atwood. Police said a container of alcohol was found in the car.

Atwood went to his house to call for help. About seven to nine minutes later, Haverhill Police Sgt. Cecil Smith arrived at the accident scene. Murray was nowhere to be found.

"Based on the description of what he saw, we believe it may have been Maura," Scarinza said, referring to the witness seeing a young woman fitting Maura's description about an hour after the accident. "Based on the place and based on the time, there is a good possibility the person he saw on 112 was Maura."

The witness contacted state police April 29 about possibly seeing Murray the night of the accident.

Scarinza said although the witness thought shortly after her disappearance he may have seen Murray, he discounted that thought after talking with a friend. His friend had said Murray's accident had happened Feb. 11 instead of Feb. 9. And he had seen the young woman the night of Feb. 9.

It was after seeing subsequent news reports, and realizing the accident had occurred Feb. 9, he decided to contact state police.

The man, who Scarinza said is a contractor, checked his work records and verified he was returning home from a job in the Franconia area the night of Feb. 9 when he spotted who he and state police believe was Murray.

Maura's father, Fred Murray, is upset police didn't travel Route 112 toward the Woodstock area, at least calling ahead to the Woodstock police to ask them to look for his daughter.

"This was a young woman involved in an accident," he said. "She had a head injury by the indication of the spider hole in the windshield."

"They know she is somewhere close by and they don't go down the road to bring her to safety?" Murray asked. "If they had searched for my daughter, she would most likely be safely here now."

Sharon Rausch, Billy's mother, said she believes the news of an eyewitness is wonderful.

"It gives me renewed hope she is still alive," Rausch said. "If she sees this in print, we want her to know she's more loved than ever."

Scarinza said because of the new information from the eyewitness, a search will be conducted Saturday in the area of routes 112 and 116 where Maura was last seen by the eyewitness.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 81
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:16:31 pm
The Patriot Ledger

May 6, 2004

New tip on missing Hanson woman

By Joe McGee

A new lead in the search for missing Hanson woman Maura Murray has New Hampshire authorities searching woods a few miles from where she disappeared.

New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza said a motorist may have seen Murray jogging along Route 112 on the night she disappeared. The sighting was only a few miles from where her wrecked car was found.

Police have searched the area by helicopter and are planning more ground searches this weekend.

‘‘We're placing a lot of weight on the fact that he may have seen her,'' said Scarinza.

The witness had just gotten off work when he saw a person jogging east on Route 112 toward Woodstock. It was shortly after 7 p.m. on Feb. 9, around the time Murray was involved in a single-car accident on the same stretch of road in Haverhill. Murray was gone when police arrived about 10 minutes later and she has not been seen since.

Scarinza said the new tip seems credible. It was only a few miles from Haverhill and someone could easily jog there in a short amount of time. The road is infrequently traveled at night by pedestrians or motorists, police said.

‘‘The times he gave us are consistent and so we think that it could've been Maura that he saw,'' said Scarinza.

The clue offers at least some hope for Murray's family and friends. What happened after the car accident is only part of the mystery. Questions about why she was in New Hampshire are also unanswered. The last time friends saw her was the afternoon of Feb. 9, when Murray packed her belongings at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and left. She E-mailed professors saying there was a death in the family.

Another woman who disappeared in Montgomery, Vt., shortly after Murray is Brianna Maitland. Her family plans to meet with the Murrays this weekend. So far, police in both states see no connection in the cases.

Murray's father, Fred, recently underwent a lengthy reading with psychic profiler Carla Baron of Los Angeles. Baron believes Murray was the victim of an opportunistic killer. Although clairvoyants are considered a last resort in police work, Scarinza said detectives spoke with Baron at the father's request.

‘‘We took the information she had to offer but at this point I can't say she offered us anything substantial,'' said Scarinza.

Baron said she has a clear vision of who the killer is and why he did it.

‘‘It isn't the first time they've done this,'' said Baron. ‘‘His job involves traveling around. It's something where he is in different areas for different reasons. I think that's his motive. It's opportunity. He doesn't harvest women like a serial killer. He's a regular-looking guy, trustworthy, looks intelligent and you would never think he'd be capable. That's why Maura trusted him.''

Baron said her track record of working alongside detectives is ‘‘sterling.''

Baron was featured on the Court TV special ‘‘Psychic Detectives'' and on a recent episode of ABC's ‘‘Primetime Live.''

Murray's boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch of Oklahoma, said the family doubts the veracity of Baron's visions, but when a loved one has been missing for as long as Maura, you're willing to try anything.

‘‘It's difficult because it's human nature to want to know what happened,'' said Rausch.

Reach Joe McGee at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 82
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:18:23 pm
Boston Herald

May 6, 2004

Page 27

Families of missing women want cops to search for link

By Jessica Heslam

Despite police saying there's nothing to link them, the cases of two women who vanished from two different states are hauntingly similar, say their parents, who plan to meet Saturday to compare notes.

"We think maybe they've come in contact with the same person or groups of people. Maybe there is a real nutcase out there somewhere that committed both these acts," said Bruce Maitland, whose 17-year-old daughter, Brianna, vanished from Vermont March 19.

"We would like someone to look at both these cases," Maitland said yesterday. "It at least ought to be looked at."

Brianna Maitland vanished after her shift at the Black Lantern Inn restaurant in Montgomery, Vt. Her car was found a mile away the next day, its rear end rammed into the side of an abandoned house.

On Feb. 9, University of Massachusetts nursing student Maura Murray vanished after her car hit a snowbank on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H. When police showed up, the car was locked and the 21-year-old Hanson, Mass., native was gone.

Maitland said both are beautiful women who disappeared without a trace after some sort of automobile mishap. They vanished about 60 miles apart.

Vermont State Police Lt. Thomas Nelson said there's no concrete connection.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 83
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:20:15 pm
The Patriot Ledger

May 7, 2004

Parents of 2 missing want more done; Will meet tomorrow to urge a harder look at possible connection

By Joe McGee

The parents of two young women, including one from Hanson, who disappeared in locations 100 miles apart this winter will hold a press conference tomorrow morning to request more help from the FBI.

Although police have not found a link between the cases, the families think more should be done to explore what they consider a strong connection.

‘‘Police have done a pretty thorough job, but I think it's time somebody comes in from the FBI to look at both cases, and look at these girls, and see if there is someone similar that came in contact with them,'' said Bruce Maitland of Vermont.

Maitland's 17-year-old daughter, Brianna, disappeared seven weeks ago after leaving her part-time job in Montgomery, Vt., about six weeks after Maura Murray of Hanson, a 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst student, disappeared in northern New Hampshire.

Murray was last seen Feb. 9 on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., where she was in a car accident. Police showed up within 10 minutes, but Murray was gone. Because there were no footprints in the snow, many think she was picked up.

Maitland disappeared on the night of March 19. Her abandoned car was found the next morning about a mile from where she worked. Ground searches in Vermont have not yielded any evidence.

Police in both states have shared information on the cases.

This week, a local contractor reported that he may have spotted Murray walking east on Route 112 shortly after her accident.

Despite that development, the women's families are growing frustrated. Murray's mother, Laurie, said all avenues must be explored.

‘‘They're two young beautiful girls and both disappeared about the same time,'' Laurie Murray said. ‘‘(The families) are getting together to compare notes to see if there are similarities. Evidently the police department feels there aren't any.''

The FBI's Boston field office controls investigations in New Hampshire. The agency's Albany, N.Y., office controls the Northern Kingdom region of Vermont.

Personnel from the Boston office interviewed Murray family members early in the case. Special Agent Gail Marcinkiewicz, spokeswoman for the Boston office, said the office continues to support the New Hampshire state police in their investigation.

Marcinkiewicz said the FBI has resources across the country and can conduct interviews in any jurisdiction.

The more help offered, the better, Laurie Murray said.

‘‘I want as much done as possible. It's awful. She's been missing for three months without a trace.''

The parents will meet tomorrow in New Hampshire.

Anyone with information is asked to call the New Hampshire state police at 603-846-3333 or the Vermont state police at 802-524-5993. Two web sites offer information and rewards: www.bringbrihome.org and www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 84
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:22:07 pm
Boston Globe

May 7, 2004

New lead is reported in search for student - Woman was seen along N.H. road

By David Abel

A new witness recently came forward, providing a lead for investigators in the disappearance of a 22-year-old nursing student from Hanson, police have told the family.

New Hampshire State Police told the parents of Maura Murray, who disappeared in February after abruptly leaving her dorm at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, that a motorist recalled seeing a woman fitting their daughter's description jogging along Route 112 on the night she vanished.

The motorist, apparently a local contractor who commutes along the route every day, told police he saw the woman turn down a dirt road as he approached, said Laurie Murray, the missing student's mother.

"I hope this helps and at least keeps it in the news to help find my daughter," said Murray.

State Police Lieutenant John Scarinza said the man reported seeing someone fitting Maura Murray's description along the road in Haverhill, N.H., the Associated Press reported. The spot was 4 or 5 miles from where Murray had a minor car accident that disabled her vehicle just before her disappearance.

Police said they will search that area this weekend.

The witness said he saw Murray around 7 p.m. on Feb. 9, around the time she disappeared, police told the Murrays.

"I am encouraged by the lead," said Fred Murray, Maura's father, who added that he plans to hold a news conference tomorrow morning in Woodsville, N.H., to release more details. "All I can say now is we've got her alive and moving at a particular place at a particular time. I believe it's my daughter, based on the description."

Police told the family the man did not come forward earlier because he didn't connect reports of Murray's disappearance with the woman he saw.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 85
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:23:59 pm
Boston Herald

May 7, 2004

New lead gives hope to missing girl's kin

By Jennifer Rosinski

The family of a missing Massachusetts college student is optimistic about a new witness who claims to have seen the 21-year-old woman after she crashed her car into a New Hampshire snowbank more than three months ago.

"That's very encouraging and hopefully something comes of it," Maura Murray's father, Fred, said last night. "Finally, something to nibble on."

State police Lt. John Scarinza said the witness believes he saw the former West Point cadet the night of her disappearance Feb. 9, when she crashed on Route 112 in Woodsville, N.H.

The man told police he saw someone fitting Murray's description walking along the road four or five miles from the accident scene.

Police will search that area of the White Mountains this weekend.

The man did not come forward earlier because he was not sure about the date of Murray's disappearance.

The University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student from Hanson vanished from the accident scene while a witness left to call for help. She appeared uninjured.

A search for Murray began 36 hours after she vanished and dogs lost her scent 100 yards from her car.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 86
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:25:51 pm
New Hampshire Union Leader

May 7, 2004

In Brief - Police get new lead in Murray case

By Associated Press

Haverhill -- A new lead will prompt a new search for the 21-year-old Massachusetts woman who disappeared in northern New Hampshire three months ago.

State Police Lt. John Scarinza said a witness has come forward saying he believes he saw Maura Murray after her initial disappearance. The Hanson, Mass., woman disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after a minor car accident in Haverhill.

Scarinza said a man has reported he saw someone fitting Murray's description that night, walking along the road four or five miles from the accident scene. Police said they will search that area this weekend.

Scarinza said the man, a contractor who was returning home from a job in the Franconia area, did not come forward earlier because he was not sure about the date of Murray's disappearance.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 87
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:27:43 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

May 9, 2004

Skeletal remains found are too old to be missing Mass. woman

By MICHAEL COUSINEAU

Union Leader Staff

A hiker out on a scavenger hunt Friday discovered human skeletal remains in a rugged and remote region of Mount Kancamagus east of Lincoln, state police said last night.

Police quickly ruled out that the remains belonged to Maura Murray, the Massachusetts woman who disappeared from Haverhill on Feb. 9. The remains are believed to be at least several years old.

We're looking into any missing persons/hikers reported missing from that area, and I'm aware of one and maybe two from the last decade who were in fact missing and not found," State Police Lt. John Scarinza told the Sunday News last night.

Authorities hadn't determined whether the remains were of a man or woman.

We're going to send the remains to the medical examiner for identification and cause of death," he said.

A jacket and sneaker were found at the site. Scarinza said the items appeared to have been out in the elements for quite a long time." No further details were available.

The hiker reported his discovery to State Police Friday and authorities waited for sufficient light before heading out with the hiker yesterday to find and recover the remains in an area more than 3,000 feet in elevation, he said.

It's certainly safe to say he was bushwacking off the trail, which is probably why he had located the remains and others have not through some pretty rugged terrain up there," Scarinza said.

He said the hiker, whose name wasn't available, was participating in a treasure hunt.

Hikers frequently compete in such games using global position satellite equipment to find items hidden in water-tight containers left in challenging locations.

Members from State Police, the New Hampshire Fish and Game and the U.S. Forest Service removed the remains from the mountain, which is located south of Route 112 in the town of Livermore, about 8 miles from the center of Lincoln. Authorities took approximately nine hours to reach the site and return with the remains.

The skeletal remains were found about 25 miles east from where Murray was last seen.

The discovery isn't unprecedented.

In my career in the past 25 years, I know of at least several occasions where skeletal remains have been found in northern New Hampshire," Scarinza said.

Meanwhile, the families of two missing women came together in Haverhill yesterday to plead for help from the public and federal authorities.

Fred Murray's daughter, Maura, 21, disappeared on Feb. 9 in Haverhill after a car accident.

The Weymouth, Mass., man was joined by Bruce and Kellie Maitland of East Franklin, Vt., whose daughter, Brianna, 17, was last seen on March 19.

Also lending their support were Charlotte and Michael Riley of Chester, parents of 20-year-old Amie Riley, who was last seen leaving a Manchester bar in August. Her body was found last month in a marsh.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 88
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:29:35 pm
Boston Globe

May 9, 2004

State Police Find Skeletal Remains

New England in Brief / Livermore, N. H.

The skeletal remains of what could be a hiker were recovered by New Hampshire State Police yesterday about 500 feet from the summit of Mt. Kancamagus in Livermore, N.H., police said. The unidentified remains, which include a skull, were found by a hiker who ventured off a trail on Friday. The remains appear to be at least a year old, and based on their apparent age, police have ruled out the possibility they could belong to missing college student Maura Murray of Hanson, who vanished in February about 25 miles away.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 89
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:31:27 pm
Nashua Telegraph / Boston Globe

May 8/9, 2004

Families of missing women gather

Crime <>

Parents, siblings seek support, connection between three cases.

By Mike Recht

The Associated Press

HAVERHILL - The families of two missing women came together in Haverhill on Saturday to plead for help from the public and federal authorities.

Fred Murray of Weymouth, Mass., whose daughter, Maura, 21, disappeared on Feb. 9 in Haverhill after a minor car accident, set up the meeting before starting another weekend of searching.

He was joined by Bruce and Kellie Maitland of East Franklin, Vt., whose daughter, Brianna, 17, was last seen on March 19 after she left work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, Vt.

Also lending their support were the parents of 20-year-old Amie Riley of New Hampshire, who was last seen leaving a bar in August. Her body was found last month in a marsh.

Although they had never met before, the parents hugged tearfully, knowing each other’s pain. Murray said the three cases “easily could be” connected, although state police said there is no evidence pointing in that direction.

Murray said the three investigations should be centrally coordinated by an agency such as the FBI, since they cross state lines.

“There is substantial reason for the FBI to be involved,” he said. “People should be yelling for the FBI to come in.”

“What if the cases are not related and a local person is involved?" he said. “Then people here should be uneasy. It takes a local to catch a local.”

Bruce Maitland said any missing person older than 12 is treated as a runaway. Murray and the Maitlands pleaded for anyone to come forward if they think they have any information about the whereabouts of their daughters.

“It can come to you; it can be your family; it can be your daughter,” Kellie Maitland said. Asked what message she wanted to send to the public, she shouted tearfully, “not one more girl; not one more beautiful girl.”

Charlotte and Michael Riley have been lobbying lawmakers to change the rules for reporting a missing adult. According to Mrs. Riley, it took police three months to enter her daughter’s name into the National Crime Information Center system.

About 15 Fish and Game officers, joined by the New England Canine and the Upper Valley Wilderness Response team with six dogs, searched the woods for Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, about five miles east of the accident site on Route 112. A limited ground and helicopter search was conducted in March, and another helicopter search was done last week, Fish and Game officer Todd Bogardus said.

The search was prompted by a new witness account of a woman fitting Murray’s description walking along the road that night.

Searchers would not be out again unless some evidence is found, he said.

"There is substantial reason for the FBI to be involved. People should be screaming for the FBI to come in." - Fred Murray, Father of missing 21-year-old.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 90
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:33:19 pm
The Caledonian-Record

Monday May 10, 2004

Families Issue Emotional Plea For FBI Help

By Gary E. Lindsley

WOODSVILLE, NEW HAMPSHIRE -- When Fred Murray and Kellie Maitland met for the first time Saturday morning, it was a very emotional moment for the parents of two missing young women.

Maitland went up to Murray and they tenderly embraced, both knowing one another's pain of not knowing what has happened to their daughters.

Murray's daughter, Maura, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill the night of Feb. 9.

Maitland's daughter, 17-year-old Brianna, has been missing since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, Vt., the night of March 19.

Maitland, her husband, Bruce, and Murray were joined by Charlotte and Michael Riley of Chester, N.H., in a press conference at the American Legion, Ross-Wood Post 20, in Woodsville Saturday morning.

The Rileys were told their daughter, Amie, who had been missing since August, was found in April in a swamp in Manchester. She had been brutally murdered.

Murray and the Maitlands clamored for public support in having the FBI brought in to investigate not only the disappearances of Maura and Brianna, but also the murder of Amie.

Murray has been beseeching New Hampshire State Police officials at Troop F to call in the FBI to join the investigation since learning his daughter was missing.

The FBI will not join an investigation until asked by the police agency handling a case.

And after learning about the disappearance of Brianna, Murray and the Maitlands called for state police in both New Hampshire and Vermont to call in the FBI.

State police officials in both New Hampshire and Vermont have said there isn't any connection between Maura and Brianna's disappearances, other than they both were involved in car accidents.

However, they also have not said how they have ruled out any connection.

"Something has to be done," Charlotte Riley said. "It's important. No one knows where to turn. I don't want (the media) to portray my grief. I want them to portray something has to be changed."

She spoke about how the police in Manchester did not place her daughter's information into the National Crime Information Center until three months after she had disappeared.

Riley said until a case gets an NCIC number, parents of missing children do not receive any help with searches or posters or from support groups.

Kellie Maitland said her daughter had been at a party a week before she disappeared. She had been assaulted at that party. "Maybe she knew something," she said. "We are hoping someone out there knows something."

Murray said, "We need help. All three families need help. None of us have our daughters. If these three cases are connected, and they very well could be, it's horrendous. You could have a killer locally in your midst." He said there is ample reason for the FBI to become involved.

"We are asking for your help," Murray said, pleading to the public through the media. "People should be screaming for the FBI. We want this to be brought to a close. You owe it to yourselves, folks."

Bruce Maitland said although he has been told the cases aren't related, he believes no one has really looked into whether they are connected.

"I am going to practically beg the governor (Jim Douglas) to step up to the plate," he said. "Let's give (state police) some help."

Kellie Maitland said she felt as if they are up against the wall.

She spoke about a drug bust at a crack house in Vermont in which those busted were let back out on the street the very next day.

"We can't keep having a revolving door for criminals," Kellie Maitland said. "They are back out there. We don't have our daughter."

"Not one more girl!" she continued, her voice quivering. "Not one more beautiful girl! They are bright. They are talented. Not one more. It's a pretty bad Mother's Day."

With that, she walked away from the microphones and went over to Murray, tears streaming down her face. He hugged her, trying to console her.

Her husband joined her and laid his head on top of hers, encircling his arms around her as they listened to Charlotte Riley speak. Riley said until people are in such a situation, they have no idea what it is like.

She spoke about the lack of media coverage after it was determined her daughter was missing. "She was at a bar," Riley said. "Does that make her less of a person?" The Maitlands and Murray responded with a resounding no.

She also emphasized the importance of pressing police to enter the information into the NCIC system. "The system is not working," Riley said. "Three months! It was three long months before she was considered missing!"
Title: Newspaper Articles # 91
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:35:11 pm
Journal Opinion

May 12, 2004

Missing woman's parents plead for FBI, local help

By Cicely Richardson

Woodsville -- On a sunny spring morning with a chill wind the parents of two missing young women held a press conference on May 8 outside American Legion Post #20 in Woodsville. They suggested the two cases may be connected and wanted local police to call in the FBI.

Bruce and Kellie Maitland of East Franklin, VT, and Fred Murray of Hanson, MA, had summoned newspaper and television representatives to keep alive the search for their daughters and raise the awareness of people throughout the area. They were joined by Charlotte and Michael Riley of Chester, NH, whose daughter Amie had disappeared last summer. Her body was found eight months later.

"Why are we here?" said Kelly Maitland. "We're all hoping someone out there knows something."

"We need help. We don't have our daughters," said Murray.

Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts, had disappeared after running off the road on a sharp curve in Route 112 east of Swiftwater, on Feb. 9. A bus driver who lived near by reportedly came upon the disabled car around 7 p.m. and offered to help, be she declined. He then went home and called the police. The Haverhill police, who responded, did not find Murray.

Brianna Maitland, 17, disappeared on March 19 after leaving work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, VT. She was heading to Shelton, VT where she was living with a friend. Later that night, her car was found, backed into an abandoned house about a mile away from the inn.

While the Vermont and New Hampshire state police see no connection between the two cases, the parents think a connection is likely. They point out that both involved young women who were driving alone at night on rural roads. Kelly Maitland said that "accident situations" 90 miles apart in this area were "unusual."

If these cases are connected, said Murray, "The people of this area have a horrendous situation -- they could have a killer walking in their midst." Murray and the Maitlands would like to see the FBI brought in, to centrally coordinate and run all three cases -- the search for Maura Murray and Brianna Maitland and for the killer of Annie Riley.

"The State police work hard and they're nice guys. But they are restricted in their resources, and they've hit a stone wall," said Murray. He said the FBI had offered help, but local police refused. He pointed out that his daughter disappeared not far from the Connecticut River, but the New Hampshire State Police investigation cannot cross the river, the border with Vermont.

If the cases are unrelated, he continued, and "if a local bad guy from this area harmed my daughter, people here have to be uneasy."

Since February night, Murray has been searching fir his daughter, crawling through every bridge and culvert, pressing the police, checking bus stations and asking bus drivers if they saw his daughter. He has checked topographical maps to identify where a vehicle might have gone, checked with neighbors as to what was accessible, and searched.

Murray expressed particular frustration by the news this week that a second person had seen a young woman walking east on Route 112 about four or five miles east of the accident scene about an hour later. "I'm convinced it was my daughter," said Murray, adding, "so when the police arrived she was right around the corner. They could have taken a ride up the road and grabbed her."

A star in the windshield of the car indicated she may have hit her head, there was an empty beer can on the floor, and the outside temperature was 12 degrees, Murray said. "She was in danger." Why hadn't the police driven further or called the next town for help and why had it taken three months for another witness to come forward, he asked.

Addressing the people of the area, Murray pleaded, "Search your own property. Use your imagination. I can't possibly cover every single place." He also called on people to ask their local agencies to help. "If somebody here did something, he is still with you," he warned.

"I am asking the people of the north country to call the FBI," Murray concluded.

Murray joined the search for his daughter 36 hours after she disappeared, but the Maitlands did not even learn of their daughter's disappearance until four or five days after the car was found. Bruce Maitland said that, despite a slow start and bad weather, "We've essentially covered the area" of Franklin County. "It's blatantly apparent that she's not here," he continued, adding that the police do not have the resources to look further.

Kelly Maitland said that "awful rumors" that Brianna had been found and descriptions of how "broke out" almost immediately after their daughter's disappearance became public. Those have continued, but by now the Maitlands have learned not to believe anything until they hear it from police.

One problem, said Bruice Maitland, is that if anyone over 12 years old disappears, it is first treated as a runaway. "She wasn't living with us at the time, but she didn't run away," he said. Uncashed paychecks, contact lenses, clothes, jewelry and medicine she needed were all in her car, a sure sign to her mother that she had not run away.

"It feels like we've reached a wall," said Maitland. "There's no structure that helps lead us now." Her husband proposed that every state should have one or two officers who are trained to investigate accident scenes and disappearances. He said he had made that recommendation to Gov. Jim Douglas..

"Schools are coming to close, and your kids are going to be out there walking the roads," her husband added. "These people need to be found."

"Not one more beautiful girl -- they're talented, they're intelligent. We're not losing one more," vowed Kelly Maitland.

"My daughter was missing eight months -- her body was found," said Charlotte Riley. "You can't imagine what it feels like. We're as much victims as my daughter was." She said her daughter, a high school dropout, had disappeared from a bar, and "no one took it seriously."

Riley shared information on the organizations she had learned about that can help families of missing children and adults. The first step, she said is to get a National Crime Information Center (NCIC) number which must be assigned by local police.

Calling on the press to "make the public aware," Riley said had been no press coverage for their daughter until her body was found, and it had been three months for authorities to recognize her as missing. "The system isn't working -- its just isn't working," said Riley. "We need to make the system work for all of us."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 92
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:37:03 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

May 14, 2004

Dad can't give up search for daughter

By Mike Recht

HAVERHILL -- There are 48 mountains in New Hampshire at least 4,000 feet high, and Fred Murray has climbed them all -- many of them with his daughter Maura. They snowshoed together, ran road races together.

When she was in high school, then at West Point and later at the University of Massachusetts as a nursing student, they would go away on camping weekends.

He coached her in softball and basketball, and in her early years, he picked her up from school every day.

"This kid is my buddy," he said.

But he hasn't seen her since early February.

Maura Murray disappeared after she failed to make a curve on rural Route 112 and hit a snowbank while driving the night of Feb. 9 in northwest New Hampshire. She escaped serious injury and asked a nearby resident who came by not to call police. He did anyway, but by the time they arrived, she had vanished into the wintry night, leaving her car and belongings behind.

She also left behind her mother and two sisters, one a police officer and the other a West Point graduate stationed at Fort Bragg, who might soon be sent to Iraq. And she left behind her father.

It's been three months and he hasn't given up hope of finding her, even if she is dead.

"Do I want to find her? Not really. I keep looking, but I don't want to be successful. It's a horrible position to be in," he said.

Murray said his daughter might have been distraught because she had another accident two days earlier. She also apparently planned to get away because she lied to professors about a death in the family and said she would be gone from class for the week, then packed her belongings as if she was moving out.

However, Murray believes she might have been the victim of foul play, although police said there is no evidence pointing in that direction.

Almost every weekend since Feb. 9, he has made the eight-hour round-trip drive from his home in Weymouth, Mass., to the Woodsville section of Haverhill. He searches the vast forest or knocks on doors and questions neighbors who might have seen something. He also hands out fliers with Maura's picture.

His daughters and Maura's boyfriend, who is in the military, were able to help at first, and occasionally some volunteers join him. Last weekend, a couple from Vermont, the Maitlands, whose own daughter disappeared in March, searched with him.

But most of the time, he's alone, arriving Friday night, searching until dark Saturday and into late afternoon Sunday and then driving home.

He doesn't even think about whether he will make the trip.

"There's no decision to make. There's no option," he said. "As a father, I don't think about it. It's automatic.

"How am I able to stand this? I don't know. I make myself do it. It's got to be done. I don't want to be here.

"Some mornings I hate to wake up; I hate to open my eyes."

Last weekend was particularly difficult. The Maitlands were coming, and so were the Rileys of Manchester, whose daughter disappeared last August and was found dead in Manchester. The media was invited to call attention to their desperation.

"I knew I was going to have to talk about it," Murray said.

The searching is easier.

During the winter, he searched the snow for footprints. The snow is gone now, so he searches the woods alongside the road. He even climbs through culverts under the road, head down, looking for any clue.

"I don't want to look up, afraid of what I might see," he said. When he finds nothing, "it's a great relief," he said. "Not finding her (body) is encouraging."

He even searched the Kancamagus Highway -- one of her favorite places about 25 miles away -- should she have contemplated suicide, though he is quick to point out, "I don't think she did."

He doesn't know how long he will keep coming back, but there always is another area to search. Only recently, a man came forward and said he saw someone who matched Maura's description about five miles up the road from the accident scene. Maura, a runner and hiker, easily could have covered the 18 miles to Woodstock, or the five miles back into Woodsville and across the Connecticut River into Wells River, Vt., where a bus leaves at 11 every night.

"I don't think about how long I'll keep going," he said. "I search it and can put my mind at ease that I looked there."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 93
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:38:55 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

May 16, 2004

Lost -- and sometimes found in the White Mountains

By Lorna Colquhoun

If nowhere is a place where no one has trod for decades, than Mount Kancamagus is in the middle of it.

A hiker found himself there last week on what the Appalachian Mountain Club's White Mountain Guide describes as a "trailless mass of round, wooded ridges" and where he stumbled upon human remains.

Several law enforcement officials returned with the man the next day to retrieve the remains and last week, dental records confirmed this was Steven Romines, a Massachusetts man who went missing almost 20 years ago, in October of 1984. Investigators say initial reports had indicated that he was "distraught" at the time and while no cause of death was determined, it is likely that he committed suicide.

"From where the location was, he was off the beaten path," said State Police Lt. John Scarinza, commander of Troop F in Twin Mountain.

The discovery was a bit of a wonder and a reminder of the secrets the mountains keep -- and sometimes reveal in their own time.

New Hampshire may be a small state and "sprawl" might be a buzzword in some parts of it, but there are places here where people get lost.

Sometimes they are never found.

Tough to find

Last week's recovery is certainly not the first time remains have been discovered after a significant length of time has passed.

Ten years ago, hikers on the Valley Way trail in Randolph discovered the remains of a Massachusetts woman. The Valley Way, the most direct and easiest trail to the AMC's Madison Hut, is a popular route. According to newspaper accounts, her remains were found no more than 75 feet off the trail.

She had been reported missing nine years before.

State Police Sgt. Bob Bruno can understand how difficult it is to find someone who wanted to be lost. He hiked up Mount Kancamagus last weekend.

"There was no trail," he said. "We were climbing up rock ledge and through small balsams. We put our heads down and just pushed."

And even when they got to the top of one of the ridges where the hiker took a GPS reading after discovering the bones, Bruno said they did not find them right away.

"Even with sophisticated equipment, we couldn't find it," he said.

Plenty of missing cases

Local police say they get field several calls a year from relatives reporting that loved ones may have headed for the mountains intending to end their lives. Veteran officers who have dealt with these situations say in such stressful moments, people return to an area where they had once found happiness or other spiritual reasons.

"How many others have there been over the years?" Bruno mused, noting that some people may have never been reported missing.

"I know there are others out there who have never been found. If I sat down, I could probably come up with quite a few others."

There is no list, per se, of people believed missing in the White Mountains. Bruno, a 24-year veteran of State Police, figured the remains he helped retrieve last week were either Romines' or another man who had been reported missing years before.

The remains were not of the young man who went missing in 1983 from Franconia Notch. He remains a mountain statistic whose fate has yet to unfold.

The Miller mystery

Michael Miller was 23 in 1983, up with friends from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for an October weekend. On that particular Sunday, according to newspaper accounts, he shouted "See you at the summit" to a group of friends and departed up the Old Bridle Path on Mount Lafayette.

It was 3 p.m. on that day, far too late to consider summitting the 5,260-foot mountain. He wore jeans, boots and a leather jacket over a sweater.

A search that lasted nearly a week followed, in weather conditions that deteriorated, as they do rapidly in the approach to winter. On the last day, winds howled at hurricane force.

To this day, nothing indicating what might have happened to him as ever been found.

"It happens," said Grafton County Sheriff Charlie Barry, a former director of the state's Fish and Game Department.

One of his most puzzling cases happened more than 30 years ago.

Ethel Conners' last walk

"Her name was Ethel Conners and she and her husband -- they were both in their 80s -- lived in Plymouth," he recalled.

One night, they took a ride up to a house they owned on Swain Hill in the Glencliff area of Warren. He started mowing the lawn. She changed her shoes and told him she was going to take a walk up the road.

"He kept mowing and when he finished, she never showed up," Barry said.

What followed was a massive search of the area, involving scores of people. Barry spent time in a helicopter searching from the air. Volunteers did line searches along the side of the road, in case she had been struck by a car and thrown into the woods.

"We searched from Glencliff to Warren," he said. "We never did locate her."

A case as puzzling as the Conners disappearance has been shaping up in the woods of Haverhill, where Maura Murray, a Massachusetts nursing student, was last seen following a minor car accident in February. Air and ground searches have failed to turn up any clues.

The Learjet

It has not only been people whose fates have been concealed by the mountains. In the past five decades, at least three planes had disappeared and were not discovered for lengthy periods of time.

The most recent, and perplexing, mystery was the Learjet that went missing out of Lebanon on Christmas Eve 1996. Unequipped with a locator device that would likely have denoted where it went down, the jet was found by an Orford forester, Quentin Mack, in a depression on Smart's Mountain in Dorchester.

It was missing for almost three years, despite intensive searches in the years that followed.

Mack told investigators that he had been within 100 yards of the crash site the week before.

"The notion people have that the woods are full of people is definitely not true," said Fish and Game Lt. Dave Hewitt the day after the crash was discovered. "There are many areas in the state where no human being has put a footprint on the ground in years and years."

That was the case in this area. There was no trail leading to the site -- getting there involved about 45 minutes of bushwhacking through some challenging terrain, but a little more than half a mile off a well-maintained logging road.

The Cessna

The Learjet was not the only aircraft crash in New Hampshire that went undiscovered. In June 1972, a hiker on Jennings Peak in Waterville Valley discovered the wreckage, and the body of the Iowa pilot still strapped inside, of a Cessna.

It had been missing since March 1966.

"It had been bound for Maine from Burlington, Vt.," said Paul Leavitt, the assistant Grafton County Sheriff, who was the Waterville Valley police chief at the time. He described the crash area as heavily wooded.

The Piper Comanche

The most fabled lost plane went down in February 1959, when two doctors on the staff of the Dartmouth Medical College were returning from an emergency in Berlin aboard a Piper Comanche.

That plane was missing for more than 80 days, recalled Barry, who was a young conservation officer at the time and had participated in the extensive search.

It was finally discovered that May, after a plane went up on a search. The Piper had gone down in the remote Pemigewasset wilderness, about 12 miles north of Lincoln and about nine miles off the Kancamagus Highway.

"The snow had melted and you could see it right from the air -- it was upside down," Barry said.

It was later found that the two doctors had survived for several days after the crash and had left notes for their families.

Mount Kinsman legend

There is other lore in these mountain places of people who went missing and were later found. Some have been lost in time, the legends outliving the archival knowledge of people who knew about it.

One of those legends comes out of the little town of Easton. In a slim volume of the town's history published in 1976, "Looking Back at Easton" tells the curious story of a Mormon settlement in the Easton Valley, on the slopes of Mount Kinsman.

"Legend has it that these people, originally from Vermont, were living here in the 1830s," the story goes. "One day, the people of the valley looked up toward the settlement and saw smoke from the chimneys. On going up to investigate, they found the stoves still warm, with pots of porridge cooling on them, but no sign of people."

It was surmised that these settlers had gone west where their leader, Joseph Smith, was establishing a home for the Church of the Latter Day Saints, according to the Easton history.

Robert Frost, who lived for several years in neighboring Franconia, immortalized the story in a poem, "A Fountain, A Bottle, A Donkey's Ears and Some Books." In it, Frost is badgering a local man to take him to the ruins of the settlement.

"To shut you up, I'll tell you what I'll do:

I'll find that fountain if it takes all summer

And both our united strengths to do it."

"You lost it, then?"

"Not so, but I can find it.

No doubt it's grown up some to woods around it."

Frost never found the settlement, nor has anyone else over the years. The Easton history notes that determining who these Mormons were, where they lived, and when they lived in town "has been an absorbing task."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 94
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:40:47 pm
The Caledonian-Record

May 21, 2004

Another Person Reported Missing - Man Fails To Return From Walk

By Gary E. Lindsley

A 24-year-old man is the fourth person to be reported missing since the beginning of this year in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont and the North Country of New Hampshire.

Matthew Harris, a coordinator of a meditation course at Karme Choling in Barnet, was last seen leaving the Buddhist meditation retreat at 3 p.m. Tuesday. He had a walking stick and a day pack.

Officials at Karme Choling reported Harris missing at 3 p.m. Wednesday.

State police Sgt. Robert Clark doesn't believe there is any connection to the disappearance of three other people.

Another 24-year-old man, Timothy Young of Glover, Vt., was the first to be reported missing. Glover, who is 6 feet tall, weighs 180 pounds and has blond hair, was last seen Jan. 20.

On Feb. 9, 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray disappeared after being involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H.

She is a 5-foot, 7-inch brunette, weighs 115 pounds and has blue eyes.

Another young woman, 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon, Vt., hasn't been seen since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery around 11:20 the night of March 19.

Maitland has medium dark brown hair, hazel eyes, weighs about 105-110 pounds and is 5 feet 4 inches tall.

Although a missing person report has been filed on Harris, Clark does not believe he fits in the missing person category.

Clark said Harris has departed for areas unknown without telling anybody in the past. He does not believe Harris' disappearance is connected in any way to those of Young, Murray and Maitland.

"He is a free-spirited traveler," he said. "You can't lump him in with the others. He may not know he is (listed as) missing. He has a history of traveling the world while following different religious organizations."

Clark said during 2001-02, Harris took off without telling anybody where he was going. He was found in the Amazon in Peru emaciated, weighing only 82 pounds.

Then, from November 2003 to February 2004, he went to Scotland, following a religious sect.

"It's not like a 14-year-old girl who lives next to me and does not show up for work," Clark said as an example. "She's a missing person. That scenario is different from this."

State police have issued a bulletin to all police agencies in New England to be on the lookout for Harris.

If a police officer spots Harris, he or she is to ensure Harris is OK. The police officer is then supposed to contact Clark.

"He has a right to (go anywhere he wants)," Clark said. "He has a right not to have police following him. This is completely, completely different than the other three. This is a kid with a history (of taking off)."

Harris' father, Paul, doesn't agree.

He said when Matthew took off for the Amazon, he had let him and his wife, Anne, know. The same was the case when he went to Scotland.

"He had told us he was going to the Amazon," Harris said. "He called and told us he was going on a slow boat down the Amazon and we wouldn't hear from him four or five weeks."

When the five weeks had come and gone and they hadn't heard anything, the Harrises became concerned. Through the help of a shortwave radio operator, they learned he was in a Peruvian village and in bad shape.

Harris said Matthew went with the head of Karme Choling, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, to Scotland for about three months.

"It's sort of like being asked by the pope to be his assistant," Harris said.

His son, he said, is very learned and intelligent. "He is very generous and outgoing," he said. "We (once) gave him a watch. We asked him several months later how he liked his watch. He said he had given it to someone who needed it more."

Harris had praise for Karme Choling. "They are a terrific organization and they have treated Matt fantastically well. This is very out of character for him."

Founded in 1970 by ChÜgyam Trungpa Rinpoche, KarmÉ ChÜling offers year-round meditation retreats and yoga retreats.

Matthew, according to his father, left behind his passport, clothes and study materials.

Josh Silberstein, the retreat's health and well-being director, said Matthew had worked at Karme Choling for 21/2 years until October 2003.

Silberstein said Matthew had returned in February to work as coordinator of a meditation program.

He said Matthew was last seen by Bill Brauer, Karme Choling's director. "It's not uncommon for people to go for a walk," Silberstein said. "So, Director Brauer did not think anything about it."

Like Matthew's father, Silberstein said the 24-year-old's disappearance is out of character.

When Matthew did not show up for dinner at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Silberstein was notified. "Then, we did an exhaustive search of the land," he said, which consists of 675 acres of fields, forest and hills.

The search ran from 7:15 to 10:30 Tuesday night. Then, it resumed at 10:30 Wednesday morning. The search of the property ended about 12:30 p.m.

Then, members of Karme Choling drove about 20 miles south and north on Interstate 91. They also searched sections of Route 5.

When 3 p.m. Wednesday arrived, and Matthew had not returned, Silberstein said state police were notified.

Silberstein said Matthew did not appear to be despondent or depressed any more than anyone else, until the day he disappeared. "After lunch, it was noticed he was more erratic," he said. "His demeanor changed. He was not there ... he was off thinking about something. He was not as interactive as he normally was."

Matthew is fluent in Spanish and can speak some French and Italian. He also knows sign language.

He is 6 feet, 2 inches tall, weighs 175 pounds, has blond, close cropped hair, and has a red and blue chain-like tattoo around his left arm. He also wears glasses.

Anyone with information about Matthew's whereabouts are asked to call state police at 802-748-3111.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 95
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:42:39 pm
The Patriot Ledger

May 24, 2004

Coping pains families of the missing: Says mother of Molly Bish, it's ‘like a bad movie'

By Joe McGee

Magi Bish remembers the ‘‘fragile Fridays,'' an end-of-the-week prayer ritual of asking God for one more week of strength to continue looking for her missing daughter, Molly.

And Maureen Lemieux will never forget going to bed and not wanting to wake up when her 10-year-old granddaughter, Holly Piirainen, went missing.

With the search for Maura Murray more than three months old, times also have turned desperate for family and friends of the 22-year-old Hanson woman who disappeared on Feb. 9 in Haverhill, N.H. There is no trace of Murray. Her ATM and cell phone have been dormant. Woods have been searched by ground and air several times.

Bish and Lemieux, who lived through the same anguish in two of the state's highest-profile missing person cases, said the need to know what happened is indescribable.

‘‘Evil is what this is,'' Magi Bish said. ‘‘It's like a bad movie and you can't get out, and the fear when you don't know what happened, it can make people cross over. I fought the mental monsters every day.''

Maura Murray's family has traveled to New Hampshire countless times. Every weekend they make the four-hour trek from the family home in Hanson to New Hampshire to canvass rural woods and interview people they have never met in hopes of finding any scrap of information.

Bish said it is hard to explain how someone makes it that long with little hope of seeing their child alive again. Investigators last spring found Molly Bish's skeletal remains 5 miles from the Bish home in West Warren. Molly had been last seen in June 2000 at Cummins Pond in Warren, where she worked as a lifeguard.

Magi Bish and her husband, John, devised their own coping mechanism during the three years of not knowing Molly's fate.

‘‘We had what we called ‘fragile Fridays.' If we got through one more week, we knew we could do it again the next,'' Bish said.

Maura Murray's father, Fred Murray, has been the most active figure in the search for his daughter. His public criticism of police, his consultation with a psychic and his compulsive hikes to New Hampshire are all symptoms of the aching quest to know what happened, Maureen Lemieux said.

Lemieux's granddaughter Holly Piirainen was found dead about two months after being abducted from her family's summer cottage in Sturbridge in August 1993.

‘‘Mostly my son went out,'' Lemieux said. ‘‘They took ATVs, four-wheel-drive vehicles, whatever they could do up in the woods, looking around. They went with psychics. You don't want to leave any stone unturned. If somebody thought they had an idea, you went with it. If there was a psychic or anyone that sounded reasonable, we left immediately and searched.''

The Bish family has spoken to Fred Murray and offered their support. Magi Bish said she identifies with Fred's tireless spirit. It is all you have in a situation like this, she said.

‘‘If you're a ‘doer,' and Fred sounds like he is, you just go. I'm sure it's hard because they live so far away, but you just do it. You're never prepared,'' Bish said.

As the weeks pass, the frustration grows for investigators.

New Hampshire State Police Sgt. Thomas York said police have followed up on every piece of information. Detectives are still active on the case, but the ground searches will be discontinued until a credible tip comes along. York said he realizes they may never find Maura.

Recently New Hampshire state police found the remains of Steven Romines, a Massachusetts man who disappeared in the White Mountains 20 years ago. It can take that long, York said.

‘‘We're coming to the end of what we can possibly do,'' York said. ‘‘I hope that things turn out for the best for Maura, I really do.''

Reality is also setting in for Murray's college friends in Amherst that they may never see her again. Kate Markopoulos, a track teammate of Murray's at UMass, said she is getting classmates' E-mails addresses and phone numbers to stay in touch after she graduates. Markopoulos was taking finals last week and packing to return home to upstate New York.

‘‘I think it'll hit me after I graduate because I'll start calling people and I can't call Maura,'' Markopoulos said.

‘‘She was one of the people I planned on keeping in contact with after school, especially because she loved where I'm from because it's near the Adirondacks. She loved hiking,'' Markopoulos said.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 96
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 02:44:31 pm
The Caledonian-Record

May 25, 2004

Petition Drive Demands Action In Maitland Case - Seeks Action From Governor Douglas

By Gary E. Lindsley

The fear in her grandson's voice was the final straw for Lou Byam of Franklin.

Byam has mounted a petition drive to demand Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie, and Vermont Public Safety Commissioner Kerry Sleeper take definitive action in the disappearance of 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon.

"My grandson, who is 14, said, 'I don't want to come up here,'" Byam said. Her grandson did not want to visit her in northern Vermont because of the disappearance of Maitland and his concern for his own safety.

"He's scared," Byam said. "Parents are scared. Everyone's scared. We want answers and we aren't getting them."

The petitions, which are being circulated around sections of northern Vermont, read, "We, the undersigned concerned citizens of the state of Vermont, summer residents and tourists of the state of Vermont, do hereby petition the governor, lieutenant governor and the Vermont State Police Commissioner to figure out a way to find Brianna Maitland, no matter what it takes to get her home!

"We, as parents, friends, family, community, state, caring humans and taxpayers say enough is enough! It it time to do whatever it takes to get Brianna and others like her home."

The petition also notes because Maitland has not been found, it is time to bring in help, more resources.

"We live in fear for our children's health, safety, welfare and their lives," it reads. "Our children no longer have the freedom as an American citizen to walk, ride their bicycles, go shopping or drive their vehicles safely in our state!

"The government's first duty is to make sure its citizens are safe from crime. We are angry and want the wheels of motivation kicked into high gear. Bring Bri home now!"

Maitland has not been seen since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn late the night of March 19. Her vehicle was found partially ensconced in an abandoned building about a mile from the inn early March 20.

She disappeared more than a month after 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray was involved in a one-car accident on rural Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H.

Murray has not been seen since walking away from the accident scene the night of Feb. 9.

"Our children are our most valuable resources," Byam said. "The way the state police handled this since day one has been unacceptable. It kills me. Every day we see Bruce and Kellie (Brianna's parents). We want our state back. We want Brianna back."

"I hope it works," Kellie Maitland said, referring to the petitions. "I am starting to get desperate."

Bettina Desrochers, who is from St. Johnsbury, also is upset about the two missing young women. "It seems as if not enough is being done," she said. "We need more help. There isn't anything wrong with asking for more help."

As a parent of daughters whom she said are all beautiful, young and outgoing, her heart goes out to the Maitlands, as well as to Fred Murray, Maura's father.

With summer nearing, she is concerned about students getting out of school and their safety. "Wouldn't you want to know (the disappearances) are being handled properly?" Desrochers said.

Carolyn Gendron, who lives in Richford, also believes the investigation into Brianna's disappearance was botched from the start. She said common sense says if Brianna left behind her paychecks and driver's license, she didn't disappear willingly.

"They should know a kid wouldn't leave money behind," she said, referring to the state police. "As a parent, if it was my daughter, I don't think I could be as calm as Mr. and Mrs. Maitland."

Gendron believes the best investigators the state police have should be involved in the investigation. She also believes the FBI should be asked to be a major part of the search for Brianna.

Gendron said she almost lost her own daughter a few years ago. "Our daughter was coming home from a study group when she noticed a car kept driving by her," she said.

When there was an open area, the car pulled in front of Gendron's then 16-year-old daughter and the occupants screamed for her to get in the car. "She froze," Gendron said. "Luckily, a friend came forward and saw her and took her away."

So, she said, she got a little bit of a taste of what the Maitlands must be going through. "I can't imagine going to bed every night not knowing where this child is," Gendron said.

She truly believes there is a connection between Brianna's and Maura's disappearances. "They are too much alike," Gendron said. "They need to do a lot more to bring these girls home."

Bruce Maitland has put out his own plea to Vermont officials. "Brianna is not a runaway no matter how much the Vermont State Police ... try to play down her abduction," he wrote in a letter to the editor to area newspapers. "We desperately need you to step up for what is right and demand a large investigation involving many plainclothes/additional federal people on the ground to find Brianna and Maura before the trail goes any colder."

Today is Missing Children's Day. Carol Knowlton of the Mt. Angel, Ore.-based Child Seek Network will be reading Brianna's and Maura's names at a Missing Children's Day rally in Salem, Ore.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 97
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:05:49 pm
The Caledonian-Record

Wednesday, May 26, 2004

Fred Murray Appeals To Governor Benson Says Police Failed His Daughter

By Gary E. Lindsley

The father of a missing 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student is appealing to Gov. Craig Benson to urge New Hampshire State Police to call in the FBI for help in finding his daughter.

Maura Murray has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car accident the evening of Feb. 9 after her black 1996 Saturn failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve on Route 112 in Haverhill.

"The finest resource in the world is available and you, sir, should direct Lieutenant John Scarinza and Troop F to accept its offer," Fred Murray said in his letter. "There are corollary cases in Vermont also and this entire situation begs for central coordination and investigation by an agency which is not bound by the confines of configuration of Grafton County and the Connecticut River." Scarinza is the commander of Troop F, which is based in Twin Mountain.

Murray also was referring to Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., who disappeared after she left work late the night of March 19. Her car was found partially ensconced in an abandoned building about one mile from the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery where she worked.

Murray noted the FBI offered its assistance during the week of his daughter's disappearance. However, state police declined the offer. Scarinza said the FBI was involved in background searches and gathering information in Massachusetts. He has said the state police have enough resources to conduct an investigation into Maura's disappearance.

Besides asking Benson to direct the state police to call in the FBI, Murray also has claimed state police and Haverhill police had been grossly negligent because a cruiser was not dispatched east along Route 112 to help find his daughter after her accident.

He said police arrived within minutes after Maura was last seen by an eyewitness. "This means that when the police reached the scene, Maura could have been no further than a couple of hundred yards up the road around the first corner walking away," Murray said in his letter.

Police, including Sgt. Cecil Smith of the Haverhill Police Department, were told the driver of the car was a young woman about 20 years old. "There was an empty beer bottle found in the car and in addition, there was a spider hole in the driver's side of the windshield indicating that she had struck her head at impact," Murray's letter reads.

Murray said police should have called ahead to the Woodstock Police Department so officers from that community could have driven west to intercept Maura on the dark, desolate highway.

"She was figuratively and nearly literally right there readily available to be rescued and saved from whatever fate has befallen her," Murray said in his letter. "All that the police had to do was to expend minimal mental and physical effort."

If they had done so, Murray said, Maura would be safe with him today. "Unfortunately, the police neglected to make even the most basic effort to find her and I remain without her now, and perhaps, forever," Murray's letter continued. "The onus of this irresponsible and possibly fatal lack of action lies not only with the North Haverhill force, but also with the New Hampshire State Police who responded to the 911 calls from the neighbors as well."

Another witness is believed to have spotted Maura, who is a track star and runner, about four to five miles east of the accident scene running toward Woodstock. "I get nearly physically sick when I wake up each morning and the thought of how really little effort it would have taken to rescue my daughter automatically flashes through my mind," Murray said in his letter.

In addition to sending the letter to Benson, Murray also sent copies of it to New Hampshire Attorney General Peter Heed, state police Col. Frederick Booth, and U.S. Sen. John Sununu and Judd Gregg. Alicia Preston, Benson's press secretary, said Benson had not received the letter as of late Tuesday afternoon.

However, Murray said according to tracking records on the U.S. Postal Service Web site, Benson, Heed, Booth, Sununu and Gregg's offices received the letters Monday morning. "The young women in the northern region of your state are not safe and it is clearly imperative that you act decisively before you lose another," Murray stated in his letter. "Deep within themselves, your citizens are nervously apprehensive and anxiously awaiting your response to this threat." Booth could not be reached for comment Tuesday. And Simon Brown, chief of the attorney general's criminal bureau, said he was not aware of Murray's letter.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 98
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:07:51 pm
Fred Murray's Letter to Governor Benson

May 26, 2004

Mr. Frederick Murray

Governor Craig Benson

Office of the Governor

107 North Main Street

Room 208

Concord NH 03301

Governor Benson:

My daughter, Maura Murray, went missing after a one car accident on February 9, 2004 at approximately 7:00 PM while she was heading east on Route 112 near North Haverhill, New Hampshire. Eye witnesses place her at the crash site at one (1) to two (2) minutes before the local police arrived and no one was seen to stop and pick her up in a vehicle. This means that when the police reached the scene Maura could have been no further than a couple of hundred yards up the road around the first corner walking away. Another witness who stopped and talked with her reported to the police upon their arrival that the driver of the car was a young woman of approximately twenty (20) years of age. He added that he thought she had been drinking. There was an empty beer bottle found in the car and in addition, there was a spider hole in the driver’s side of the windshield indicating that she had struck her head at impact. The temperature that evening was twelve (12) degrees.

Given these known facts it was grossly negligent of the police to not dispatch a cruiser in active pursuit in a spirited effort to retrieve an unsuspecting and vulnerable girl with a possible head injury and subject to hypothermia because of alcohol and frigid temperature before she wandered into the pitch black of the national forest looming just ahead.

The police had full knowledge that if she were to encounter someone with ill intent that she would have no place to hide, no place to run and absolutely no help available.

Furthermore, duty as well as common sense obligates the police to call ahead to the next town in the direction they had to assume she was heading. They knew they had not passed her as they drove east to the accident site during their response to the “911” call. The Woodstock police were not notified nor asked to send an officer to intercept her by driving west in the direction in which she was approaching.

She was figuratively and nearly literally “right there” readily available to be rescued and saved from whatever fate has befallen her. All that the police had to do was to expend minimal mental and physical effort and my daughter, Maura would be safely here with me today. But, unfortunately, the police neglected to make even the most basic effort to find her, and I remain without her now and perhaps forever.

The onus of this irresponsible and possibly fatal lack of action lies not only with the North Haverhill force, but also with the New Hampshire State Police who responded to the “911” calls from the neighbors as well.

Recently, nearly three (3) months after the accident, a motorist who was driving west on Route 112 at about 8:00 PM on February 9 reported seeing a young person acting furtively heading very fast in an easterly direction at a point about four (4) to five (5) miles away from the scene of the crash. The time line and description of the individual’s appearance and clothing fits perfectly for this person to have been Maura.

This witness lives within just yards of the accident site, but said he had been confused about the exact date and time of that event because the state police had not interviewed him until 10 days had passed. As hard as this is to believe, it is actually true since an investigator helping the family questioned him on Sunday, February 15 and he said the police hadn’t been there to talk to him yet. At this point I appealed directly to the state police to pay attention to rudimentary procedure and turned our notes over to them. This apparently prompted a belated response which led to the questioning of this witness on Thursday, February 19.

That this nearly immediately located neighbor who could have been a prime source of critical information should have been questioned in a timely fashion on the very evening of the accident or, at the latest, on the following day is a fully reasonable expectation of adequate investigative policy. If this had occurred this person would have had immediate recollection of the sighting of my daughter and a “hot lead” would have ensued.

Statistics, which are very well known by state police agencies, indicate that cases get solved from tips received in the first two or three days or they can go cold forever. To wait ten days to speak to such an obvious source of potentially crucial information based on his proximity to the event will be hard to explain even for those adept at this skill. It is no wonder that the state police are reluctant to release to me their accident report to which I am probably legally entitled.

I get nearly physically sick when I wake up each morning and the thought of how really little effort it would have taken to rescue my daughter automatically flashes through my mind.

It has been over three months since her disappearance and the only leads developed have been handed to the state police by others. Yet still these guys maintain that they don’t need any help. The FBI offered its assistance during the opening week of this case but have only been utilized in a very minor way such as interviewing family members and high school friends in Maura’s hometown of Hanson, MA, and also a couple of college acquaintances.

These state police officers are great people personally, and I like them and respect them. They are the type of men and women that both you and I would be very pleased to have living in our own neighborhoods, but the inescapable reality remains that they clearly need help in finding Maura.

The finest resource in the world is available and you, sir, should direct Lieutenant John Scarinza and Troop F to accept its offer. There are corollary cases in Vermont also and this entire situation begs for central co-ordination and investigation by an agency which is not bound by the confines of the configuration of Grafton County and the Connecticut River.

The young women in the northern region of your state are not safe and it is clearly imperative that you act decisively before you lose another. Deep within themselves, your citizens are nervously apprehensive and anxiously awaiting your response to this threat.

Respectfully,

Fred Murray
Title: Newspaper Articles # 99
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:09:54 pm
Portsmouth Herald

May 28, 2004

Missing woman’s father asks gov. to get FBI help

CONCORD (AP) — The father of a missing University of Massachusetts nursing student has asked Gov. Craig Benson for help to get the FBI involved in the case.

Fred Murray of Weymouth, Mass., wants the governor to urge New Hampshire State Police to call in the FBI for help in finding Maura Murray.

She has been missing since the evening of Feb. 9 after a minor accident in which she failed to make a curve on Route 112 outside Haverhill.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 100
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:11:57 pm
The Caledonian-Record

May 29, 2004

FBI Involved In Investigation - Brianna Maitland Disappearance

Gary E. Lindsley

Experts from the FBI's Behavioral Sciences Laboratory in Quantico, Va., are involved in the investigation of the disappearance of 17-year-old Brianna Maitland.

Maitland, who lives in Sheldon, Vt., has not been seen nor heard from since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery around 11:30 p.m. March 19.

William McSalis, a supervisory senior agent in the FBI's Burlington office, confirmed late Friday afternoon the FBI is involved in the Maitland case.

In fact, McSalis said the FBI has been working closely with Vermont State Police nearly since the inception of the case.

Maitland's car was found early the morning of March 20 partially ensconced in an abandoned building about a mile from the tavern where she worked.

She left two paychecks behind in the car.

Bruce and Kellie Maitland, along with Fred Murray, father of 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray, have been demanding the state police in both Vermont and New Hampshire bring in the FBI to find their daughters.

Maura Murray disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after being involved in a minor, one-car accident on rural Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

McSalis said he could not say whether the FBI is involved in the Murray case as well. FBI officials in Boston could not be reached for comment Friday.

Regarding the Maitland disappearance, McSalis said the FBI was contacted by Vermont State Police not long after it was determined Maitland was missing.

Since then, and most importantly, he said, the behavioral sciences group from Quantico has been reviewing what has been done in the case by Vermont State Police.

FBI experts, who also can be called profilers, are using the information supplied by state police to see if it matches up with similar cases elsewhere in the country.

McSalis said a lot of work has been done so far by the group from Quantico. However, he would not discuss what evidence, if any, has been reviewed nor whether any FBI agents have visited Vermont and the accident scene because it is an on-going investigation.

McSalis also would not confirm published media reports that the team would soon be headed not only to Vermont for the Maitland case, but also to New Hampshire to investigate the Murray disappearance.

"We are working closely with the Vermont Sate Police," he said. "We don't want to go into details."

Lee Pugh, a spokesman from the FBI's Albany, N.Y., office, said he knows the Vermont State Police have conducted a very through investigation.

"We have been monitoring the case," Pugh said. "The full services of the FBI have been utilized to some degree."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 101
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:14:00 pm
The Caledonian-Record

May 31, 2004

Another Vermont Woman Reported Missing - Police Find Her Jeep

By Gary E. Lindsley

Lamoille County authorities are asking for the public's help in finding a 35-year-old Johnson woman who hasn't been seen since Thursday morning -- the third woman to disappear in Northern New England since Feb. 9.

Jodie Whitney, who has a 3-year-old child, was last seen by her husband, Edgar, before he left for work Thursday morning. She not only failed to show up for work at Stoweflake Resort in Stowe, but she also did not return home.

Like the two other women who are missing, Whitney is described as a petite woman.

On Feb. 9, 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray disappeared after she was involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H.

A little more than a month later, 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon, Vt., disappeared after she left work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery late the night of March 19. Maitland's vehicle was found about a mile from the Black Lantern Inn, partially ensconced inside an abandoned building.

Sheriff Roger Marcoux said Whitney's white Jeep Cherokee was found within a 5-mile radius of her home by a citizen Friday afternoon.

Marcoux is not releasing where the vehicle was found because it's part of the ongoing investigation.

He said the vehicle is being looked at by a Vermont State Police crime lab team.

Kellie Maitland, Brianna's mother, was heartbroken to learn another woman had disappeared.

"I believe it's (the work of) a serial killer," Maitland said. "And the clock is ticking.

"One is too many," she went on to say. "Enough is enough! They (law enforcement) should pull out all the stops."

Marcoux said there isn't anything to lead investigators to believe there is any connection between Whitney's disappearance and the disappearances of Maitland and Murray.

"We have no evidence to tie them together at this point," he said.

Marcoux said police are conducting a missing person's investigation into Whitney's disappearance because nothing so far has indicated a criminal act has been committed.

He said Whitney is a reservations supervisor at Stoweflake Resort. She was supposed to be at work at 8 a.m.

When she had not returned home by 10 p.m. Thursday, her husband reported her missing.

"This is very out of character for her," Marcoux said. "She seems to be a very responsible person ... she has a young 3-year-old child at home."

Co-workers and members of Whitney's family have been interviewed, he said.

"Everything seemed fine," Marcoux said, referring to Thursday morning when Whitney's husband last saw her.

Investigators are tracking down some leads. One, according to Marcoux, came from officials at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center.

They reported they had a woman in the hospital possibly fitting Whitney's description. Investigators went to Dartmouth, but the woman was not Whitney.

Marcoux said about 50 law enforcement officers and the New England canine team, led by Vermont State Police Search and Rescue, conducted a ground search Saturday of an area consisting of a 1-mile radius of where Whitney's vehicle was found.

That search area was expanded, but nothing was found. An aerial search was conducted Sunday.

Authorities also searched about 3 miles of the Gihon River.

Whitney is described as being 5-feet, 3-inches tall and weighing 110-pounds. She has shoulder-length brown hair and brown eyes.

People with any information about Whitney should call the Lamoille County Sheriff's Dept. at 802-888-3502.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 102
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:16:03 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

June 2, 2004

NH, Vt. bound by disappearances

By Wilson Ring

MONTPELIER, Vt. -- Investigators in Vermont are planning to meet with their counterparts in New Hampshire to compare notes after the third woman went missing in the region since February, a sheriff said.

The Lamoille County Sheriff's Department is working with the Vermont State Police in their search for Jodie Whitney, said Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux.

The only common thread between the cases is the vehicles, said Marcoux.

"We've got three women missing and in each case there has been an abandoned vehicle found," Marcoux said yesterday.

The latest case began last Thursday when the husband of 35-year-old Jodie Whitney of Johnson reported his wife missing. Marcoux said Whitney never arrived at her job on Thursday morning at the Stoweflake Resort in Stowe.

"This individual is a very reliable person. She doesn't miss work. She's never late. She has a supervisory position. She has a 3-year-old daughter at home," Marcoux said. "This is very out of character for her."

Whitney's car was found abandoned the next day. Marcoux wouldn't reveal where the car was found other than to say it was within five miles of her home.

Whitney is described as being 5-feet, 3-inches tall and weighing 110-pounds. She has shoulder-length brown hair and brown eyes.

Marcoux said he called the Vermont State Police and investigators started working on the case immediately.

"This is a joint investigation with the state police and if there are a lot of similarities, we are going to know it," Marcoux said. "We are pouring resources into it right from the get go."

The Whitney disappearance comes in the aftermath of the February disappearance of Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student who had a minor, single-vehicle traffic accident in Haverhill, N.H. On March 19, Brianna Maitland of Sheldon disappeared after leaving her job in Montgomery.

Haverhill is roughly 100 miles from Montgomery and Johnson is between the two, about 26 miles from Montgomery.

"I haven't seen any cases like this in Vermont," Marcoux said.

Marcoux says Vermont investigators will meet with New Hampshire detectives to see if any additional links can be found.

"The state police are in the process of contacting them. There is a meeting being scheduled with investigators from the three cases just to make sure we're not missing anything," he said.

Marcoux said it appeared to be coincidence that Whitney's mother Cheryl Peters was shot to death in Morrisville in 1994. No one has ever been charged in that case.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 103
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:18:06 pm
Boston Globe

June 3, 2004

Police Say Husband Confesses in Slaying

New England in Brief / Hyde Park, VT.

The husband of a Johnson woman missing since last week has confessed to killing her, police said last night. Earlier in the day investigators discovered the body of a woman but officials said they could not positively identify it as that of Jodie Whitney. At a late- afternoon news conference held to announce the discovery of the body, Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux described Edgar Whitney as a suspect in the disappearance of his wife. Edgar Whitney tried to kill himself by overdosing on pills yesterday morning, said Marcoux. Marcoux said investigators were still looking for links between the cases of two other missing women from the region. Marcoux and a State Police detective were still planning to meet Friday with New Hampshire detectives to look for links between the cases. In February Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, disappeared after a minor car accident in Haverhill, N.H., about 75 miles from Johnson. In March, Brianna Maitland of Sheldon disappeared after leaving her job in Montgomery.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 104
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:20:10 pm
The Caledonian-Record

June 3, 2004

Police Say Husband Confesses To Murder - Missing Woman's Body Believed Found

By Gary E. Lindsley

The husband of a missing 35-year-old Johnson woman has confessed to killing her, Vermont State Police said Wednesday evening. Police also announced that a woman's body, believed to be that of Jodie Whitney, had been found that afternoon.

Lt. Leo Bachand, the state police Troop B Criminal Division commander, said Edgar Whitney, while being interviewed at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington late Wednesday afternoon, confessed to killing his wife.

Whitney notified police around 10 p.m. May 27 that his wife, Jodie, had not returned home. She had not arrived to work at the Stoweflake Resort in Stowe that day. He reported last seeing her that morning before he left for work.

Jodie's white Jeep Cherokee was found by a citizen within a 5-mile radius of the Whitney home Friday.

Authorities from the Lamoille County Sheriff's Department, state police Search and Rescue Team, the state police Criminal Division, and police officers from Stowe and Morrisville, have been working together to find Jodie, according to Bachand.

Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux, during a press conference in front of the Lamoille County Courthouse late Wednesday afternoon, said the pace of the investigation was stepped up after authorities received a phone call that Edgar had taken some pills. Authorities are not releasing what the pills were.

"Right now, he is our best suspect," Marcoux said.

Bachand said family members called for an ambulance around 6:30 Wednesday morning after Edgar had taken an overdose of pills.

Edgar was first taken to Copley Hospital in Morrisville after overdosing before being transferred to Fletcher Allen Health Care.

According to Marcoux, it was information from family members which led to the discovery of what they believe to be Jodie's body.

He would not say what had happened between Tuesday night and Wednesday which led him and other investigators to believe Edgar was involved in his wife's disappearance.

While Marcoux was holding a press conference late Wednesday afternoon about Edgar Whitney's apparent suicide attempt Wednesday morning, and the finding of a woman's body during the afternoon, Edgar was confessing to killing his wife, Bachand said.

Wednesday afternoon, according to Bachand, at 1:45, a search team of about 25 combed an area beyond the original 5-mile radius already searched. They found the body of a woman at 2:03 p.m. who Bachand said was believed to be that of Jodie. He said the body matched Jodie's description.

Marcoux said a positive identification is pending.

After the press conference Wednesday, Marcoux would not say exactly where the body was found. He also said more information about the cause of death will be available once an autopsy is conducted.

Both Marcoux and Bachand said they had not seen the body because once it was discovered, the crime scene was sealed off to everyone except for the Vermont State Police crime lab team.

The body, according to Bachand was found deep in the woods, a ways off "the beaten path."

Bachand said Medical Examiner Paul Morrow will be conducting the autopsy in Burlington this morning.

Marcoux said he did not know if Edgar had a criminal record. And when asked whether there was a history of domestic violence in the Whitneys' marriage, he would not comment.

However, later Wednesday, Bachand said there was a restraining order requested against Edgar Whitney last year but was withdrawn. He said the information is available in court records.

Edgar, he said, is still in the hospital. As of Wednesday night, charges had not been filed. Bachand said State Attorney Joel Page will decide what charges to file once the investigation is complete. An arraignment, if there is one, will take place at the Lamoille County Courthouse.

Prior to the discovery of the body, Edgar's overdose and his alleged confession, Marcoux and Bachand had set up a meeting for 10 a.m. Friday with New Hampshire State Police and FBI agents to discuss the disappearances of Jodie Whitney, Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray.

On Sunday, Marcoux said there wasn't any indication Jodie's disappearance was tied to the disappearances of 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Murray and 17-year-old Maitland of Sheldon, Vt.

Although Marcoux and Bachand now do not believe there is any connection between the three cases, the meeting will still proceed at the Lamoille County Sheriff's Department office.

"We want to keep the other cases in the spotlight," Marcoux said. Bachand agreed. He said it is important to have everyone together talking about the cases.

Besides Bachand, also assisting Marcoux and his department with the Whitney investigation are Sgt. Tim Clouatre and Detective Bob Cushing, both from the St. Johnsbury area.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 105
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:22:13 pm
Lowell Sun

June 3, 2004

News Digest

Husband says he killed missing Vt. woman

HYDE PARK, Vt. (AP) — The husband of a Johnson woman missing since last week has confessed to killing her, police said last evening. Earlier in the day investigators discovered the body of a woman but officials said they could not positively identify it as that of Jodie Whitney. Investigators are looking for links among the cases of two other missing women from the region. In February Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, disappeared after a traffic accident in Haverhill, N.H., about 75 miles from Johnson. In March, Brianna Maitland of Sheldon disappeared after leaving her job in Montgomery, about 25 miles from Johnson.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 106
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:24:16 pm
New Hampshire Union Leader / St Albans Daily Messenger

June 3, 2004

Husband confesses to killing missing wife

By Wilson Ring

Hyde Park, Vt. -- The husband of a Johnson woman missing since last week has confessed to killing her, police said last night.

Earlier in the day investigators discovered the body of a woman but officials said they could not positively identify it as that of Jodie Whitney.

The sheriff's office announced last night that Edgar Whitney had confessed.

Deputy Sheriff Andrew Glover said an autopsy on the body was scheduled to be performed today, when officials from the state crime lab would also continue to search the Whitney's house.

At a news conference held yesterday to announce the discovery of the body, Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux described Edgar Whitney as a suspect in the disappearance of his wife.

"Right now he is the best suspect we have," Marcoux said.

He tried to kill himself by overdosing on pills yesterday morning, said Marcoux.

Edgar Whitney was taken to Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington after relatives called for an ambulance. Investigators were talking to him yesterday afternoon.

Marcoux said he expected a positive identification of the body later Wednesday.

"We are operating off the common sense there is a good chance of it (being Whitney's body)," Marcoux said. "We don't have a lot of missing females."

Marcoux said investigators were still looking for links among the cases of two other missing women from the region. Marcoux and a state police detective were still planning to meet Friday with New Hampshire detectives to look for links among the cases.

"We are still going to proceed with that meeting," Marcoux said.

In February Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, disappeared after a single vehicle traffic accident in Haverhill, N.H., about 75 miles from Johnson. In March, Brianna Maitland of Sheldon disappeared after leaving her job in Montgomery, about 25 miles from Johnson.

Marcoux said that information gathered from relatives helped lead to the discovery of the body.

"I can tell you this really stepped up this morning after we got the call about him taking the pills," Marcoux said of Edgar Whitney.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 107
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:26:19 pm
The Caledonian-Record

June 4, 2004

Body Identified - Johnson Woman

By Gary E. Lindsley

A body found Wednesday afternoon by a search team in a heavily wooded area near Johnson has been positively identified as that of a 35-year-old woman missing since May 27.

In a press release issued late Thursday afternoon, Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux stated Chief Medical Examiner Paul Morrow identified the body as Jodie Whitney, of Johnson.

Edgar Whitney, the woman's husband, was taken to Copley Hospital in Morrisville Wednesday after intentionally overdosing on pills. He was transferred to Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington.

It was reported on statewide television Thursday that if Whitney is released from the hospital today, he will most likely be arraigned in Lamoille County Court in connection with his wife's death.

According to Marcoux, it was information from family members after Whitney's suicide attempt which led to the discovery of what they believed to be Jodie's body.

She was found about 2 p.m. Wednesday well off the beaten path, deep in a wooded area within five miles the Whitneys' home.

While Marcoux was holding a press conference late Wednesday afternoon regarding Whitney's suicide attempt and the discovery of the body, Whitney was allegedly confessing to killing his wife, according to police.

Whitney notified police around 10 p.m. May 27 that his wife had not returned home. She also had not gone to work at the Stoweflake Resort in Stowe that day. He had last seen her that morning before he left for work.

Jodie's white Jeep Cherokee was found by a citizen within five miles the Whitney home May 28.

Prior to the discovery of Jodie's body, Edgar's overdose and his confession, Marcoux and Lt. Leo Bachand, state police Troop B criminal division commander, had set up a meeting for 10 a.m. today with New Hampshire State Police and FBI agents to discuss the disappearances of Jodie, 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon, Vt., and 22-year-old Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass.

The meeting has been postponed until 10 a.m. Thursday.

Murray, a University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student, has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H. Feb. 9.

Maitland has been missing since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, Vt. late the night of March 19.

Her car was discovered early the next morning partially ensconced in an abandoned building about a mile from the inn.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 108-Part1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:28:22 pm
VERMONT STATE POLICE

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE POLICE

PRESS RELEASE

(1 of 2)

CASE #: 04A201455

Date: Tuesday June 8, 2004

Location: St. Albans Vermont

Incident/Violation: Brianna Maitland

Missing Person Investigation Montgomery Vermont

Maura Murray Missing Person Investigation

Haverhill New Hampshire

MULTI-AGENCY CASE REVIEW MEETING

For the better part of this day the Vermont State Police, the New Hampshire State Police, and the FBI, met at the VSP Barracks in St. Albans Vermont to continue to review the Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray Missing Person cases. This is a cooperative effort between these law enforcement agencies that has been ongoing since the beginning of these investigations. The lead investigative agencies; the New Hampshire State Police and the Vermont State Police, have concluded at this time that there is no connection between these cases. It is also important to reiterate that there is also no connection whatsoever between these Missing Person cases and the Whitney Homicide case from last week in Lamoille County. “There is no serial killer on the loose in the area” stated Captain Bruce W. Lang, Chief Criminal Investigator of the VSPs’ Bureau of Criminal Investigation.

The Captains’ remarks were in reference to apparent speculation in the area media recently with regard to the three cases.

Special Agent D.J. Corbet of the Burlington Vermont office of the FBI participated in the joint agency meeting.

SA Corbet reiterated that the FBI has been involved with both missing person investigations since the onset of each. The FBI has offered several resources and continued support to the two state police agencies heading these cases and will continue to do so in the future.

The State Police in both Vermont and New Hampshire continue to seek the public’s help in providing factual information and tips relevant to either the Maitland or Murray cases as the efforts continue to locate these missing women.

A synopsis of the 3-month investigation in into the disappearance of Brianna Maitland is as follows: Lt. Thomas M. Nelson, BCI Commander for A Troop North at St. Albans released the following synopsis if the investigative actions taken in the Maitland case to date:

Brianna Maitland Age 17 (DOB 10-08-86) of Franklin Vermont was last seen at her place of employment, the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery Vermont on March 19, 2004. Brianna left work in her vehicle at 23:20 hours (11:20 PM) on that date. Maitland’s car was found the next day (20th) with its back end connected to, after having struck, an abandoned farmhouse on Rte #118, a short distance from work. Bruce and Kellie Maitland reported Brianna as a missing person on March 23rd. Brianna had left high school and previously been reported as a runaway by her father in 2003. Before disappearing on the 19th she had not been living with her parents for several months, living with friends and recently staying with one of them at that friend’s house in Sheldon, VT. The investigation has shown that Brianna Maitland had made unhealthy life style choices in her life prior to her disappearance. Specifically she had become involved in the world of illegal drugs in the area where she lived. Her association with people involved in this activity is an area of focus for the investigators.

Shortly after the Bureau of Criminal Investigation division became involved with this case on the 25th, it has been handled with a major case emphasis such as that given to homicides and other major criminal incidents.

Numerous law enforcement agencies and resources have been utilized in the investigation, such as those in the following list:

SUBJECT INTERVIEWS:

61 individuals have been interviewed, some of them multiple times.

COURT ORDERED SEARCHES / ACTIONS:

1 search warrant has been conducted at the residence of a person known to Brianna and believed involved in illegal drugs. This resulted in the confiscation of 4.5 grams of crack, and the identification of 2 firearms. One subject has been ordered into District Court to face criminal charges and this case is pending.

6 subpoenas for telephone records have been requested through Vermont District Court for records. The records to be reviewed for possible leads.

7 persons who know Brianna Maitland were subpoenaed to testify under oath before a Vermont District Court Judge.

FORENSIC SCIENCE & EVIDENCE GATHERING· The Vermont Forensic Laboratory Crime Scene response team has conducted a Forensic analysis on the Maitland vehicle.

The FBI Behavioral Sciences Unit has been consulted.

II. An overview of the Law Enforcement Agencies Involved in the Brianna Maitland Missing Person Investigation

FBI

i. Behavioral Sciences Unit Quantico

ii. VICAP

iii. Burlington Field Office

New Hampshire State Police

i. The lead and supervising detectives on the Maura Murray missing person case have been consulted.

New York City Police Department

i. VICE unit

ii. 22nd Precinct Queens

iii. Police Headquarters

Montreal Police

Lawrence Ma. Police Department

Mass. State Police Northampton

U.S. Marshals Service

U.S. Attorney’s Office Burlington

DEA

Burlington Police Department

Vermont State Police

i. Uniform division St. Albans Barracks

ii. Intelligence Unit

iii. Search and Rescue Team

iv. K-9 unit

v. Scuba Team

vi. Polygraph Unit

vii. Vermont Criminal Information Center

viii. Northern Vermont Drug Task Force

ix. Vermont Forensic Laboratory

Vermont Department of Corrections - Probation and Parole

i. St. Albans office

ii. Burlington office

iii. Newport Office

III. Other Agencies contacted or otherwise utilized in the case:

Vermont Social & Rehabilitative Services Department

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children· National Center for Missing Adults· National Crime Information Center (NCIC)

Vermont Air National Guard (Helicopter)

Canadian Missing Children’s Network

Champlain Valley Crime Stoppers

Klaas Kids Organization

Americas Most Wanted Website

Carole Sund/Carrington Memorial Award Foundation

Anyone with information on the Brianna Maitland Missing Person case is urged to contact either Vermont State Police Detective Sergeant Glynn or Detective Lieutenant Nelson at the St. Albans Barracks #802-524-5993.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 108-Part2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:30:25 pm
VERMONT STATE POLICE

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE POLICE

PRESS RELEASE

(2 of 2)

CASE #: 04A201455

Date: Tuesday June 8, 2004

Lt. John Scarinza is the “F” Troop Commander of the New Hamsphire State Police. He and Detective Sgt. Bob Bruno also of Troop “F”, participated in the meeting. Lt. John Scarinza released the following synopsis of the Maura Murray Missing Person Investigation conducted by his department:

Maura Murray Missing Person Investigation

St Albans, Vermont

June 8, 2004

On Monday, February 9th at approx 7:30 pm, Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts College Student was involved in a single vehicle accident on Rt. 112 in the town of Haverhill, NH. When Haverhill Police arrived at the scene approx 8-10 minutes later they found the vehicle locked with no one around.

To date an extensive investigation has been conducted into the disappearance of Maura Murray. The following information has been learned.

On Saturday Feb 7th Maura spent the evening out with her father and friends at a local brew pub. Later that evening, in the early morning hours of Sunday the 8th of February, Maura was involved in a single vehicle accident in the town of Hadley, Mass. She was driving her fathers’ new car at the time of the accident, and struck a set of guardrails causing approx 10,000 dollars damage to the vehicle.

By Monday morning, Feb. 9th Maura had packed up all her belongings in her dorm room at U-Mass, putting everything neatly in boxes and putting all the boxes on her bed along with a personal note she had recently received from her boyfriend. She went on the Internet and looked up directions and overnight accommodations in the Bartlett, NH area as well as Burlington, VT area. She withdrew most of her money from her personal bank account. She sent e-mails to her supervisor at work as well as a college professor saying she would be absent from work and school for a week due to a death in the family.

There was no death in the family.

She did not tell her family, her friends or her classmates that she was planning to leave school for the week.

She left Massachusetts at approx. 4:30 PM in the afternoon of February 9th, 2004.

At approx. 7:30 pm Maura was involved in a single vehicle accident on Rt. 112 in the town of Haverhill, NH. This accident was the second accident she had had in three days. The vehicle she was driving at the time of her second accident was also her father’s car, one that he had loaned to her to use while at school.

Very shortly after the accident had occurred, a passerby stopped and offered assistance. Maura seemed to be uninjured, and refused assistance, and stated that she had called Triple-A to come tow the vehicle. In fact there was no cell phone coverage in that area and Triple-A was never called.

When the passerby stated that he was going to call local law enforcement to come and assist, Maura pleaded with him not to call the police.

Investigators are also aware of some additional stresses that were occurring in Maura’s life at the time of these events to include a difficult long distance relationship with her boyfriend in Oklahoma.

At the accident scene in Haverhill, there were no signs of any struggle, or any other evidence, which would indicate that a crime had been committed.At the time of Maura’s disappearance, there was approx. 2½ feet of snow on the ground. Searchers were able to easily distinguish deer and moose tracks in the area, and the snow cover greatly assisted the searchers in eliminating possible area’s where Maura could have traveled off of the main roads in the area. The snow greatly aided the search from the air, also due to the fact that any person who would have wandered off the road and into the woods would have left a trail that would readily be seen from the air.

To date, there have been 5 air searches with the New Hampshire State Police Helicopter.

There have been searches with Bloodhounds or K-9 search and rescue teams in the area surrounding the accident site on at least 4 separate occasions.

The area in and around the accident scene has been extensively searched on the ground. This effort has been co-coordinated by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, which is charged with all search and rescue efforts in New Hampshire.

State, local and Federal law enforcement agencies have been involved in the investigation into the disappearance of Maura Murray.

Investigators believe that Maura was headed for an unknown destination and may have accepted a ride in order to continue to that location.

Investigators are hoping to speak with anyone who may have given Maura a ride sometime after 7:30 pm on Feb 9th in or around the Haverhill, NH area. Also, if anyone has any personal knowledge of why Maura was leaving school, where she was headed, or what her intended destination was, this information would be extremely helpful to assist investigators in locating Maura.

Based upon the evidence gathered to date, New Hampshire State Police investigators strongly feel that the disappearance of Maura Murray does not have a common link with the investigation into the disappearance of Brianna Maitland in Vermont.

We continue however to work with our counterparts in the Vermont State Police, and local and federal law enforcement in our effort to locate both of these missing young women.

Anyone with information regarding the disappearance of Maura Murray is urged to contact the New Hampshire State Police at #603-846-3333.

Auth: Lt. John K. Scarinza, Commander, Troop F
Title: Newspaper Articles # 109
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:32:29 pm
The Caldedonian-Record

Wednesday, June 9, 2004

Parent Accuses Police Of Character Assassination

Vermont, N.H. Officers Deny Link Between Missing Women

By Gary E. Lindsley

Law enforcement authorities from Vermont and New Hampshire, after a daylong meeting with the FBI Tuesday, say there is no connection between the disappearances of a 17-year-old Vermont woman and 22-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student.

Vermont State Police and New Hampshire State Police met with Burlington, Vt. FBI agent D.J. Corbet in St. Albans.

In a press release issued after the meeting, state police from Vermont and New Hampshire emphatically said there is no connection between the disappearances of Brianna Maitland of Sheldon, Vt., and Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass.

Capt. Bruce W. Lang, chief of Vermont's Bureau of Criminal Investigation, said there is no serial killer on the loose as has been speculated in the media.

In fact, they said Maitland had made several bad life choices before she disappeared, and at one point, had been a runaway.

Investigators also said Murray had nearly cleaned out her bank account, packed up her belongings in her dorm room at UMass Amherst, and made off for destinations unknown.

"How can you say there is not a connection?" asked Bruce Maitland, Brianna's father. "They don't have any evidence saying they aren't connected. It's a flat-out lie.

"I think it's almost character assassination of the victims. They said Maura wanted to disappear. Brianna, they said she chose an unhealthy life choice."

He believes state police in both states have spent less time on the two cases than trying to shut up the parents and others. "I am disheartened," Maitland said.

Talking to some of the investigators after the meeting and a press conference, he said he had the distinct impression the investigations are done.

"They said they were tired of wasting their time on leads (which lead to nowhere)," Maitland said. "They want to say it's the girls' own fault."

Brianna has not been seen since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery at 11:20 p.m. March 19.

Her car was found early the next morning partially ensconced in an abandoned building about a mile from the inn.

Murray has not been seen since she disappeared after being involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9.

According to Lt. Thomas M. Nelson, Vermont BCI commander for Troop A North, Brianna had previously been reported as missing by her father in 2003.

In the joint press release, Nelson also said a VSP investigation had revealed Brianna had made unhealthy lifestyle choices in her life prior to her disappearance.

"Specifically, she had become involved in the world of illegal drugs in the area where she lived," he said. "Her association with people involved in this activity is an area of focus for the investigators." She was living with a friend in Sheldon at the time of her disappearance.

New Hampshire State Police Troop F Commander Lt. John Scarinza described Maura as having had a difficult long-distance relationship with her boyfriend, Billy Rausch, who is stationed at Fort Sill in Oklahoma.

Scarinza also said the day before she disappeared, she had had an accident with her father's brand-new car in Hadley, Mass. The accident, he said, caused $10,000 worth of damage to Fred Murray's car.

The next day she packed up all her belongings in her dorm room and headed off to a destination unknown. Later that day, she had a second car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., and disappeared before police arrived.

"She withdrew most of her money from her personal bank account," Scarinza said in the press release. "She sent e-mails to her supervisor at work as well as a college professor saying she would be absent from work and school for a week due to a death in the family."

"There was no death in the family," he continued. "She did not tell her family, her friends or her classmates that she was planning to leave for the week. Investigators believe that Maura was headed for an unknown destination and may have accepted a ride in order to continue to that location."

Maura's father, in reaction to Scarinza's statements, said, "As far as Scarinza's amateur psychology goes, it does not matter why Maura left. Something happened.

"They do not want the FBI (fully involved) because it would be like calling the police on itself. They botched the case from the start."

Murray said Troop F first treated his daughter as a missing runaway. Then, they said she had frozen to death.

Their next theory, according to Murray, was Maura had committed suicide. "Again, if it was suicide, they would have to look for her," he said.

If it was a suicide, then the state police would not have to look for a bad guy, Murray said. "If there is a bad guy, then the state police have not been able to do the job and catch the bad guy," he said.

Regarding his daughter's relationship with Rausch, Murray said it was a strong, loving, very, very good relationship.

"The accident with my car? It was not a big deal," he said. "My insurance covered it. They are saying anything to avoid searching for a bad guy. It's just a smokescreen.

"They have to get the job done. They should be made to accept (the FBI's help). If you blame the victims, it doesn't matter. Something still happened to these girls. Someone harmed them. It's a crime."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 110
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:34:32 pm
St. Albans Messenger

June 10, 2004

Authorities shed new light on missing women's lives

By Leon Thompson

St. Albans Town - Police concluded Tuesday there is no connection in the mysterious disappearances of Brianna Maitland, 17, of Franklin, and Maura Murray, 21, of New Hampshire.

Investigators did say, however, that Maitland had strong ties to the drug community, and that Murray probably ran away.

For four hours yesterday, the Vermont State Police (VSP), New Hampshire State Police and FBI met at the VSP barracks in St. Albans before addressing the media about the cases. Their assessment: The Maitland and Murray cases are unrelated.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 111
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:36:35 pm
The Caledonian-Record

June 10, 2004

Letters To Editor - Help bring Bri home

By Laurie Gilman

To the Editor:

I was so glad to see the article about Brianna's case in your paper. I do not live in Vermont but will be a resident of Victory in a few years. I read your paper online every day which is how I became aware of the disappearances of Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray.

I have been following her case on her family's Web site, www.bringbrihome.org, and I have downloaded both Brianna and Maura's missing posters and will be leaving them at rest stops and with truck drivers as I travel from Maryland to Vermont the first of June.

It is hard to help from so far away but I have written letters and e-mails, etc., to do what I can.

If there are others in Vermont or nearby that want to help, I suggest they go to the Web site for downloads of the missing girls' posters, the petitions and information on the upcoming garage sale. Brianna's family and the local people that are helping can use anything anyone can offer in the way of assistance.

Please check it out and do what you can to help them bring Bri home.

Laurie Gilman

Sunderland, Md.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 112
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:38:38 pm
The Caledonian-Record

June 10, 2004

Parents Of Missing Vermont Teen Heartened By Dubie Meeting

By Gary E. Lindsley

The parents of a missing 17-year-old Sheldon woman are feeling a bit more optimistic they will be receiving help from law enforcement authorities after meeting with Vermont Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie, Wednesday.

Kellie and Bruce Maitland of Franklin met with Dubie and Public Safety Commissioner Kerry Sleeper at the Williston state police barracks to talk about their daughter Brianna, who has been missing since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery 11:20 p.m. March 19.

Kellie said she left the two-hour meeting with guarded optimism.

Dubie and Sleeper told the Maitlands they will ensure Brianna's disappearance will gain exposure with the national media, according to Bruce Maitland.

Both Maitlands, after Tuesday's press conference in which state police said at one point Brianna had been a runaway and had become involved in the world of illegal drugs, were surprised by the tenor of their meeting with Dubie and Sleeper - especially Dubie.

"They are starting to give an honest appraisal of what the case really is," Bruce said. "It's either drug-related or she has been killed. They have dropped the runaway (listing)."

Although he is glad authorities will drop the runaway characterization and start treating the case as being criminal, he cannot miss the reality of what that means.

"It's kind of disheartening," Bruce said, "because every night we pray she is a runaway."

If she was a runaway, the Maitlands believe they would have a better chance of finding their daughter unharmed.

Wednesday was a change for Bruce after having heard what authorities said about his daughter, and Maura Murray on Tuesday. Murray is the 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student who hasn't been seen since she disappeared after having a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9.

Tuesday, state police from New Hampshire and Vermont said there wasn't any connection between the disappearances of Brianna and Maura.

They also said they weren't going to waste any more time on any more worthless leads.

"I think it's almost character assassination of the victims," Bruce had said on Tuesday. "They said Maura wanted to disappear. Brianna, they said she chose an unhealthy life choice."

He said Wednesday's meeting with Dubie and Sleeper was a complete turnaround, just the opposite, from Tuesday's press conference.

"The lieutenant governor was super," Bruce said. "We went into the meeting that it was a setup. But, the lieutenant governor really wants to do what's in his power to help us out."

The Maitlands were assured by Dubie the case was of a very high priority.

"When the lieutenant governor called us a couple of days ago, I hoped he was sincere," he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 113
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:40:41 pm
The Caledonian-Record

June 16, 2004

State Police Discard Runaway Theory - Drugs May Be Connection To Disappearance

By Gary E. Lindsley

The passing of seven days has resulted in a huge turnaround in the way Vermont State Police are treating the disappearance of Brianna Maitland.

Maitland, 17, was last seen at about 11:20 p.m. March 19 when she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery.

VSP had originally said Maitland was a runaway and had run away in the past. During a press conference June 8, they said they were tired of wasting time tracking down worthless leads.

They said Maitland had made some bad life choices which may have led to her disappearance.

The next day, June 9, Bruce and Kellie Maitland, Brianna's parents, met with Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie and Public Safety Commissioner Kerry Sleeper at the Williston state police barracks.

The Maitlands came away from that meeting with guarded optimism. They said Dubie said he was treating Brianna's disappearance as a serious case and would do what he could to help.

Tuesday, another press conference was held.

This time, the state police said they and the Maitlands were united in their request for factual information which will lead to finding Brianna.

They also acknowledged that it is not a case of a teenager running away.

"With each day that passes without a solid trace of information on her whereabouts, it becomes more apparent that she may have been the victim of a violent crime," the VSP said in a press release.

"Brianna had been living away from home and was socializing with community members involved in the use of illegal drugs," the press release continues. "Investigators with the Vermont State Police are interested in solid fruitful information that may assist in furthering this investigation."

While the Maitlands have said all along they believed their daughter was the victim of a crime, they do not necessarily agree with the VSP position Brianna had been socializing with drug-related people.

They have said she had been turning her life around. She was working two jobs and was living with a friend in Sheldon.

Brianna was driving home to Sheldon after leaving the Black Lantern when something went wrong.

Her green 1985 four-door Oldsmobile 88 was found early the morning of March 20 partially embedded in an abandoned barn off of Route 118 at the Dutchburn Farm. The car was about a mile from the Black Lantern.

"It is just kind of strange," said Bruce Maitland, who attended Tuesday's press conference, referring to the VSP's change regarding Brianna's disappearance. "I feel, in some ways, this is a major step. They have admitted she may have been a victim of a serious crime and was not a runaway."

Regarding VSP's position Brianna had had recent contacts with people connected to drugs prior to her disappearance, he said state police told him two people had said Brianna had had a drug debt.

However, that doesn't mesh with what Brianna's friends have been telling the Maitlands.

"I am a little discouraged they are bringing up the drug stuff," he said. "Everything I have gotten from her friends doesn't indicate that. No one has seen her high."

The state police, according to Bruce Maitland, are offering to make deals, even with people connected to drugs.

"They are desperate for really good information because I don't think they have any," he said.

Unlike the case of 22-year-old Maura Murray, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student who has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car accident the night of Feb. 9 on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., state police in Vermont have enlisted the help of the FBI.

They have received help from the FBI's Burlington office as well as the agency's Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, Va. They also have been in contact with the U.S. Marshal's Office.

New Hampshire State Police have not asked the FBI to become fully involved in the Murray disappearance. They have said they have all the resources they need to work the case.

People with information about Brianna's disappearance should contact VSP at 802-524-5993 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-427-8477.

People with information about Maura Murray should call New Hampshire State Police at 603-845-3333 or 603-271-3636.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 114
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:42:44 pm
The Caledonian-Record

June 23, 2004

Letters To Editor - Reservations about officers' attitudes

By Helena Murray

To the Editor:

Since February, I have been reading the articles on the disappearance of Maura Murray. I believe that The Caledonian-Record has covered the story extremely fairly. I do, however, have serious reservations about the approach the various police agencies have taken and their apparent attitude about Maura's disappearance.

I took particular note of some comments that have been made ... "They also said they weren't going to waste any more time on any more worthless leads."

This would seem to discourage anybody from reporting anything. I would ask the law enforcement agencies this question: "How do you know a lead is worthless until you investigate?"

"I think it's almost character assassination of the victims," Bruce had said on Tuesday. "They said Maura wanted to disappear. Brianna, they said she chose an unhealthy life choice."

Mr. Maitland is absolutely correct in this statement, but it doesn't go far enough. Whatever Brianna and/or Maura may or may not have done, why would the law enforcement agencies punish the families.

As to one other comment: "Capt. Bruce W. Lang, chief of Vermont's Bureau of Criminal Investigation, said there is no serial killer on the loose as has been speculated in the media," I would ask whether the person involved in the murders in the later '80s was ever caught. If not, then isn't he probably still on the loose somewhere?

And, yes, as you might guess I am related to Maura, although distantly.

Helena Murray

Weymouth, Mass.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 115
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:44:47 pm
WPTZ NBC 5 Burlington, Vermont

June 28, 2004

Police After Meeting: Murray, Maitland Cases Not Connected - Maitland Family Canoes Down River Searching For Body - Police crossed state lines to meet about a pair of missing women.

Investigators were looking for connections between the disappearances of Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray, and in the end, they said they found none.

The Maitlands took a canoe ride down the Mississquoi River.

"The last time we did this river, she was along with us in a kayak," Brianna's father Bruce Maitland said.

This time, they're searching for her body.

"If we come across something here it's not going to be good, but you just have to keep searching like that," Maitland said.

Police continue to search for leads, but to no avail.

Murray and Maitland disappeared this winter after separate but similar car accidents.

Investigators from both states met for four hours with the FBI.

Their conclusion is that there is no connection whatsoever between these cases.

In fact, they still find no evidence of foul play in either case, but offer a plea from both police and parents for any information that can help.

They said there are probably some people reluctant to bring information to them because of drug activity or criminal past.

"We don't care about that," one officer said. "We're trying to locate both of these women."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 116
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:46:50 pm
The Caledonian-Record

Thursday, July 1, 2004

Lieutenant Says Major Crimes Involved Since Beginning

Police Secure Murray Items For Evidence

By Gary E. Lindsley

State police say they have secured items from a missing 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student as possible evidence.

Lt. John Scarinza, commander of New Hampshire State Police Troop F, says the items are being held, possibly for further investigation.

However, Scarinza also says it's not true the state police Major Crimes Unit is only now getting involved in the Maura Murray case.

Murray has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car crash on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., about a mile east of Swiftwater Feb. 9. She has not been seen since the night of the accident.

He said the Major Crimes Unit, and specifically, Sgt. Charles West, has been involved in the Murray disappearance since three days after she disappeared.

Scarinza also said detectives from Troop F and the Major Crimes Unit have been used during the missing person's investigation.

He was emphatic that the items from Murray's car are not only now being looked at. "The items have already been gone through once," Scarinza said.

When asked whether any of the items, including clothing and books, had been analyzed for forensic evidence in the beginning of the investigation, he said, "You don't just send a bag of stuff down there."

However, he did say the items in Murray's black 1996 Saturn were inventoried by Haverhill police officers during the first week of the investigation back in February. In addition to diamond jewelry, books, clothing and some alcohol found in the vehicle after the accident, some items were missing.

"She had a (black) backpack when she left Massachusetts," Scarinza said. "We have not been able to locate the backpack in the car or her (dorm) room. That was the pack she used at school."

Scarinza also said when Murray left the Amherst campus, she had with her a box of wine, and bottles of vodka, Kahluha and Bailey's Irish Cream. The box of wine, of which most had been spilled, was found in the car. But some of the other bottles were not found.

Also found in the car, specifically on the back seat, was a book written by Nicholas Howe, titled, "Not Without Peril." Scarinza said the book is about tragedies regarding search and rescues in the White Mountains.

"Mrs. (Sharon) Rausch tells me that is Maura's favorite book," he said. "What does that mean? I don't know." Haverhill police, in a press release issued two days after Murray's disappearance, said she possibly was suicidal.

Because it has been nearly five months since the night Murray disappeared, and because state police believe there is not a lot to look for, Scarinza said it's appropriate to have the items in the car at the time of the accident returned to investigators so they can be held as possible evidence.

"I don't know what we will do with them," he said. "We want to have all the items if we need them. At this point, we are holding them for evidence." That includes Nicholas Howe's book.

"For instance," Scarinza said, "is there something significant about that book? I don't know."

If there is something highlighted in the book which may help with the investigation, they will have the book readily available.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 117
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:48:54 pm
The Caledonian-Record

June 29, 2004

Major Crimes Unit Involved - Maura Murray Case

Gary E. Lindsley

The New Hampshire State Police Major Crimes Unit is now involved in the disappearance of 22-year-old Maura Murray.

Murray, a University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student, has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car accident the night of Feb. 9.

Her father, Fred, said the Major Crimes Unit earlier this month requested that everything present in Maura's black 1996 Saturn at the time of the accident be returned so a forensics investigation may be conducted.

At the time of the accident, Maura had about a week's worth of clothing, books for her college classes and diamond jewelry with her.

Everything in the car was turned over to family members after the accident.

The Major Crimes Unit only now asking for the items in Murray's car be returned is unsettling to her father.

"It's evidence Major Crimes was not involved until now," Murray said. "They sent (state trooper Todd) Landry to my daughter, Kathleen's (house).

"This is pretty sloppy," he continued. "For them to have told me they were treating this as a criminal investigation is a bunch of (expletive)."

Murray said, "So, it shows how amateurish this has been right from the beginning. They can't get away with this. They have to be held accountable."

Earlier this month, Murray requested a copy of the accident report and any other relevant information from the Haverhill Police Department and the state police.

To date, he has not received any response from Troop F, which is based in Twin Mountain.

However, he did receive a letter from Haverhill stating the request is being considered.

While Murray has faced frustration after frustration with New Hampshire State Police and Haverhill police regarding his daughter's disappearance, a northern Vermont family is receiving more communication from Vermont State Police looking into the disappearance of their 17-year-old daughter.

Brianna Maitland clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn at about 11:20 p.m. March 19.

Her car was found early the next morning partially ensconced in an abandoned building about a mile from the inn.

Brianna was headed home to her friend's home in Sheldon, where she had been living, when she disappeared.

Since the Maitlands met with Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie and Public Safety Commissioner Kerry Sleeper earlier this month, Bruce Maitland said there has been a big difference.

For one, police have discarded the runaway theory. And two, there is more communication.

"Ever since meeting with Dubie and Sleeper, things have turned around," he said.

However, Maitland also said there are no new leads.

"It's just like she has vanished right off the face of the earth," he said.

A vast network of friends is helping the Maitlands with sending out press releases across the country regarding Brianna's disappearance.

"If she's alive, we need your help," Maitland said, appealing to anyone who may be able to provide some information about Brianna.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 118
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:50:57 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

July 2, 2004

Missing woman had books, liquor in car

HAVERHILL (AP) -- One of the items found in the car of a missing Massachusetts student is a book on White Mountain tragedies, "Not Without Peril."

A family friend said the book, written by Nicholas Howe, is Maura Murray's favorite, State Police Lt. John Scarinza said. "What does that mean? I don't know."

Murray, 22, a University of Massachusetts nursing student, has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car crash on Route 112 in Haverhill the night of Feb. 9.

Murray escaped serious injury and asked a resident who came by not to call police. He did anyway, but by the time they arrived, she had vanished, leaving her car and belongings behind.

Scarinza said the items in Murray's black 1996 Saturn were inventoried by Haverhill police officers during the first week of the investigation back in February.

In addition to "Not Without Peril" and other books, diamond jewelry, clothing and some alcohol were found in the car.

Some items were missing. "She had a (black) backpack when she left Massachusetts," Scarinza said. "We have not been able to locate the backpack in the car or her (dorm) room. That was the pack she used at school."

Scarinza also said when Murray left Massachusetts, she had with her a box of wine and bottles of vodka, Kahlua and Bailey's Irish Cream.

The box of wine, most of which had spilled, was found in the car. Some of the other bottles were not found.

Murray had said his daughter might have been distraught because she had another accident two days earlier. She also apparently planned to get away because she lied to professors about a death in the family and said she would be gone from class for the week, then packed her belongings as if she was moving out.

However, Murray believes she might have been the victim of foul play, although police said there is no evidence pointing in that direction.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 119
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:53:00 pm
The Caledonian Record

Saturday, July 3, 2004

Maura Murray Family, Friends Say State Police Lied

By Gary E. Lindsley

Family and friends of a missing 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student say New Hampshire State Police are misinforming the public.

"You don't try to provide spin unless you are trying to cover something up," said Sharon Rausch, mother of Maura Murray's boyfriend, Billy Rausch of Fort Sill, Okla.

Murray has not been seen since she was involved in a minor one-car accident Feb. 9 on dark, and curvy Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

"They are a bunch of liars," Rausch said. "I am at the point the only people I am worried about offending are Billy and Fred."

Fred is Fred Murray, Maura's father.

Murray and Rausch are upset about comments made this week by New Hampshire State Police Troop F commander Lt. John Scarinza.

Scarinza pointed to a book by Nicholas Howe, "Not Without Peril," as a possible source of why Maura disappeared. The book was among items found in her car.

In the book, there are stories about tragedies and rescues in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, areas in which Maura and her father had hiked.

Scarinza has said Murray told police his daughter was suicidal.

However, the first mention of Maura being suicidal was in a press release issued by Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams two days after Maura's car accident and disappearance.

Murray says he never told police his daughter was suicidal.

"I want to set the record straight," he said. "Scarinza is using (Howe's book) to reinforce his suicide theory. It's nothing like that.

"Maura liked the book," he said. "She was making her way through it. The reason she liked the book was because she likes several different areas in the White Mountains. There are all kinds of landmarks. That's all it was."

Although he is upset about Scarinza's comments, Murray isn't surprised.

"If he goes with the suicide theory, that means nothing happened on his turf and during his watch," Murray said. "However, when you have a bad guy (involved), it's in (Scarinza's) back yard and he can't solve it."

"He's pushing it hard," he continued. "He's to the point he's making things up."

Rausch, equally upset with Scarinza's comments, says, "It's pretty pathetic that 41/2 months later, the state police want to secure the evidence."

She says it's comparable to the state police not searching for Maura until 36 hours after she disappeared.

"They never did a forensics study," Rausch said. "And Lt. Scarinza is providing a lot of misinformation to the public - including that she ran away to a new life; she froze to death; she committed suicide."

"When I lay awake at night," she continued, "I wonder how well Lt. Scarinza is sleeping."

And Rausch is adamant when she says she never told Scarinza about "Not Without Peril."

"That angers me because this is just another thing that is a lie," she said.

"Why didn't he ask me what that meant?"

Rausch was referring to Maura saying the book was her favorite.

"She told me (the White Mountains are) a favorite place she likes to go," she said, adding Maura told her, "And most of all it's my favorite place on earth."

Scarinza could not be reached for comment Friday afternoon."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 120
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:55:03 pm
The Patriot Ledger

July 5, 2004

Cop comments anger missing Hanson woman's mother: Laurie Murray rejects suicide, runaway theories

By Dan DeLeo

Maura Murray's boyfriend and her mother say they are angry that police are suggesting that the young woman who disappeared five months ago killed herself or ran away.

The 22-year-old nursing student from Hanson has not been seen since she was involved in a minor accident in Haverhill, N.H., on Feb. 9.

‘‘She would never run away and she would never commit suicide,'' her mother, Laurie Murray of Hanson, said yesterday.

Murray said she believes her daughter was abducted.

Maura Murray's boyfriend, Army Lt. William Rausch of Weymouth, said he told police from the beginning of the investigation that he does not believe she would take her own life.

‘‘In no way shape or form did I say that was the most likely explanation. They should be focusing on finding Maura,'' said Rausch, who is stationed at Fort Sill, Okla.

Rausch complained that local police did not bring FBI officials onto the case once they ran out of leads.

‘‘It's been disheartening to see the many mistakes they've made,'' he said.

Murray's family was outraged last week when New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza linked the discovery of a book about tragedies in the White Mountains to the possibility that Murray committed suicide.

The book, ‘‘Not Without Peril,'' was found in Murray's abandoned car, along with diamond jewelry, clothing and alcohol.

In an interview last week, Scarinza said, ‘‘What does that mean? I don't know.''

Laurie Murray said the book is one of her daughter's favorites. She said Maura and her father met the author, Nicholas Howe, while hiking in the region.

Murray took offense at Scarinza's comments.

‘‘What he is saying on the news is slanderous and it is interfering with the search for her,'' she said. ‘‘It's upsetting the whole family more than we already are.''

Scarinza could not be reached for comment.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 121
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:57:06 pm
The Caledonian-Record

July 10, 2004

Woman Missing Since July 5

By Gary E. Lindsley

Burlington Police are seeking the public's help in locating 26-year-old Ligia Rae Collins, who disappeared July 5. Her disappearance is being treated as suspicious.

Collins was last seen by her live-in boyfriend around midnight July 4, according to Detective Cpl. Shawn Burke.

Police were told Collins was headed to a male friend's residence in Burlington. She never arrived. Burke said her boyfriend reported her missing about 9 p.m. on Monday.

Collins is a biracial female of Korean descent, according to Burlington police. She is 5-feet, 4-inches tall and weighs between 180 and 200 pounds. She has a nose ring and long, dark blond hair.

Collins' car, a blue 1996 Ford Escort station wagon bearing Vermont plates DLD 818, is also missing.

She left behind two small children who are staying with family members, as well as personal belongings.

Police are following up on several leads, which include conducting field interviews and physical searches of locations where Collins may have been.

Burlington Police are also talking to other police agencies about two other missing women. "We are talking to state police about similarities," Burke said. "We are still in the infancy stage of the investigation."

Friday marked the fifth month since a 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student, Maura Murray, disappeared after she was involved in a minor one-car accident on rural Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., about one mile east of Swiftwater the night of Feb. 9.

Thirty-nine days later, 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon, Vt., disappeared after clocking out of work at 11:20 p.m. at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery.

Her car was found a mile from the inn early the next morning, March 20, partially ensconced in an abandoned barn.

Information about Collins' disappearance has been placed in the National Crime Information Center data base.

Anyone with information about Collins' disappearance is asked to contact the Burlington Police Department at 802-658-2714 or Crime Stoppers at 802-864-6666.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 122
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 04:59:09 pm
The Patriot Ledger

July 13, 2004

New search begins for Hanson student

By Patriot Ledger staff

New Hampshire State Police today combed an area where a 22-year-old nursing student from Hanson was last seen.

About 60 troopers searched the area in Haverhill, N.H., where Maura Murray was involved in a minor automobile accident on Feb. 9.

A man answering the phone at State Police headquarters in Twin Mountain, N.H., said the effort was being made ‘‘just to see if they could pick up anything new.''

The man, who did not identify himself, said that the search began this morning and was expected to continue until late this afternoon.

Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, packed up her belongings in her dorm room on Feb. 9, loaded up her car and abruptly left school.

She crashed her car in Haverhill, N.H., that night, and refused help from a passing motorist. Ten minutes later, police arrived, but Murray was gone.

Police have had few leads in their investigation, and Murray's family has grown increasingly frustrated about the lack of progress toward finding her.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 123
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:01:12 pm
WCAX

July 13, 2004

Search for Missing Girl Intensifies

Woodsville, New Hampshire

College student Maura Murray was last seen along Route 112 in February. Murray had just crashed her car on this corner in Haverhill, New Hampshire.

"What is clear it was her intention to leave school at the time she drove and ended up in Haverhill, New Hampshire. She had packed all her belongings, put them in boxes," said Lt. John Scarinza who is heading up the investigation for the New Hampshire State Police. The rest is a real mystery.

Authorities are searching for any clues that may lead to Murray's whereabouts. Ninety people in five teams fanned out over a one mile radius from the crash site on Tuesday.

"We have them going through drainages..anything that encompasses within that one mile radius," said Lt. Todd Bogardus of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Authorities say there is no one thing that led them to search the area again, but they are looking for items Murray had with her when she left Massachusetts that wintry night. One was a backpack.

"They were smaller type items that maybe if they got dropped on the side of the road or thrown over a snow bank, you could have missed them at the time of the searches when there was snow on the ground," Lt. Scarinza told reporters.

Murray's car was searched at the time of the crash. Police say they found alcohol inside and outside the vehicle.

"There were indications inside the vehicle, specifically we found what we believe to be red wine, spilt on the driver's door, on the headliner and front seat of the vehicle and we found a container that we believe was holding red wine immediately outside the vehicle on the ground," said Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams.

Relations between the Murray family and authorities have been tense at times. Relatives have questioned whether police have done enough to find her.

"I understand that it has to be very frustrating for the family and we are doing everything we can to bring this to a conclusion for them," said Lt. Scarinza.

Tuesday's search did not turn up anything substantial. For now there is no closure, just a mystery.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 124
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:03:16 pm
The Caledonian-Record

July 14, 2004

Another Search For Maura Murray Turns Up Little - Missing Since Feb. 9

By Lorna Colquhoun

HAVERHILL, NH - Nearly 100 searchers from across New Hampshire combed a one-mile radius in Swiftwater, N.H., Tuesday, in search of clues that could shed light into the perplexing mystery of what happened to Maura Murray.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 125
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:05:19 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

July 14, 2004

Searchers again look for clues in Murray case

By Lorna Colquhoun

HAVERHILL -- Search teams fanned out through fields, woods and drainage ditches yesterday on another search of the area where a Massachusetts woman was last seen more than five months ago.

Nearly 100 people, including 60 state troopers from as far away as Exeter, conservation officers, and volunteers from search-and-rescue organizations, spent the day on line searches, painstakingly looking for any clue that would shed new light on the disappearance of Maura Murray.

The 22-year-old nursing student has not been seen since she had a minor accident with her father's car on Route 112 near the Weathered Barn. Murray disappeared minutes before Haverhill police responded that evening to a call about the accident.

Investigators have not had any breaks in the case since that cold night in February.

This was the fourth search of the area, and teams yesterday spread out to cover a mile radius of the accident.

The first searches were conducted while there was snow on the ground, and teams found no tracks leading from the road into the woods or nearby Wild Ammonoosuc River.

Throughout yesterday, state police detectives could be seen removing materials from areas along the road.

"We've located several items, but there is nothing conclusive related to Maura or our investigation," said Fish and Game Lt. Todd Bogardus. "Nothing out of the ordinary, nothing to raise eyebrows."

Nor was there any particular reason why the search was conducted yesterday, said state police Lt. John Scarinza.

"There is no real reason," he said. "We have searched this area four times previously; the first ones were conducted when there was 2½ feet of snow on the ground. We have a 90 percent confidence level that she is not in this half-mile radius. We're just trying to eliminate as much as we can."

Bogardus said the items retrieved yesterday are what can typically be found on any roadside this time of the year and what investigators took away might not be related to the case, but they will be checked out.

Authorities are, however, still looking for one item, Scarinza said. Murray's friends said that when they last saw her in February, she was carrying a black backpack.

"There are some items that were in her possession that were not located in her car," Scarinza said. "She had a black backpack, which has not been found. If we could find it, that would be important."

At the site where Murray was last seen, a bright blue ribbon hangs, along with a picture of her and a poster offering a $40,000 reward for information about her whereabouts.

Police won't speculate about what they think might have happened to Murray, but Scarinza said there has been no banking activity on her accounts. The few leads that have come in over the past five months have not yielded any answers. Just last week, Scarinza said, two Rochester women called investigators, after they saw an article and picture in The Union Leader, to say they had been out at a bar there and saw a woman who looked like Murray.

"That hasn't panned out," Scarinza said.

Investigators have outlined what Murray did in the last few days before she went missing.

They know that:

Four days before her disappearance, she received a phone call at work that left her so distraught, she was walked back to her dorm at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst by a supervisor.

Two days before the accident, she crashed her father's new car into guardrails along a road in Hanson, Mass.

By the morning of Feb. 9, she had packed up all her belongings in boxes and left a note for her boyfriend.

She went on the Internet to look up driving directions to Burlington, Vt., and withdrew most of the money from her bank account.

She sent an e-mail to her work supervisor and a professor saying she would be absent from school for a week due to a death in the family. Scarinza said there was no death in her family.

"The next certainty is the accident, and what happened after that is unknown," he said. There is no evidence that foul play was a factor, he said.

Investigators have spent "thousands of hours" trying to find Murray.

Anyone with information can contact state police at 846-3333.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 126
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:07:22 pm
The Patriot Ledger

July 15, 2004

Mom: I was kept in dark about search; Not told that police were looking for missing Hanson student this week

By Don Conkey

HANSON - Laurie Murray is pleased that New Hampshire State Police searched again this week for clues about her daughter's disappearance.

She just wishes someone had told her about it.

‘‘The way they are treating me is cruel, for me to find out this information secondhand through the media,'' Murray said.

New Hampshire State Police conducted the all-day search Tuesday in Haverhill, N.H., in the area where 22-year-old nursing student Maura Murray of Hanson was last seen in February.

New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza said yesterday the search failed to turn up anything new about Murray's disappearance.

While that news disappointed Laurie Murray, far more upsetting, she said, was the lack of communication.

Laurie Murray, who lives in Hanson, said she didn't know that a search was under way until she was called by The Patriot Ledger on Tuesday morning.

No one from New Hampshire State Police talked to her about it, she said.

‘‘I called State Police late in the morning Tuesday and they couldn't even tell me where in New Hampshire they were searching,'' Murray said.

‘‘I identified myself as Maura's mother, and the only information they said they could give me was that a search was going on,'' she said.

‘‘I left my number, but nobody has called,'' she said.

Scarinza acknowledged that State Police did not contact Murray, but said they did speak with her ex-husband, Frederick Murray of Weymouth, on Monday.

Scarinza said State Police tried to call Frederick Murray after the search, but as of late yesterday morning they had not been able to reach him. Meanwhile, Scarinza said, Frederick Murray had been on television in New Hampshire saying he had never been contacted by police about the search. Frederick Murray could not be reached for comment.

Laurie Murray said she deserved a call. ‘‘I am the mother.''

Scarinza said State Police thought the Murrays were exchanging information. ‘‘If the communication is not happening between Mr. and Mrs. Murray, we can correct that,'' he said.

Laurie Murray has had a testy relationship with the investigators pursuing leads in the case. Less than two weeks ago, she criticized police for suggesting that Maura may have killed herself or run away. Murray believes her daughter was abducted.

Scarinza said nearly 100 people searched Tuesday in the area where Maura Murray was involved in a minor car accident on the night of Feb. 9.

During their first search of the site more than five months ago, police found diamond jewelry, clothing and alcohol in Murray's abandoned car, along with a book about tragedies in the White Mountains.

Murray, then 21, apparently refused help from a passing motorist after the accident. Police arrived 10 minutes later, but she was gone.

She has not been heard from since.

Scarinza said that 60 troopers, as well as state fish and game officers and volunteers, were involved in the search Tuesday. Searchers fanned out in a one-mile radius from the accident scene and searched from 9 a.m. until dark.

Scarinza said the investigation into Murray's disappearance will continue.

‘‘At this point, several thousand hours of investigation have gone into this. We continue to try and find out what happened,'' he said.

Don Conkey may be reached at dconkey@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 127
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:09:25 pm
The Caldeonian-Record

Saturday, July 24, 2004

Father Denied Access

State, Haverhill Police Won't Release Murray Information

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL NEW HAMPSHIRE - New Hampshire State Police and Haverhill police are refusing to release information regarding a February accident involving a Massachusetts woman and her subsequent disappearance.

Maura Murray, a 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student, was involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9.

Her father, Fred, filed Freedom of Information Act requests with state police and Haverhill police to obtain information about the accident and the investigation into Maura's disappearance. His requests were denied by both state police and Haverhill police.

Murray received a letter dated June 29 from Brian Hester, a lieutenant with the state police Special Investigation Unit.

In the letter, Hester said, "A determination has been made these files are investigative in nature, the release of requested reports, logs and data information would be a disclosure constituting an unwarranted invasion of privacy under RSA 91-A:5 IV."

"The release and disclosure at this time could interfere with an ongoing investigation," Hester continued in his letter. "See Lodge v. Knowlton, 118 NH 574 (1978). Therefore, your request at this time is denied."

Gary J. Wood, an attorney representing the Haverhill Police Department, used the same reasoning and court case to decline providing Murray with the information surrounding his daughter's accident and subsequent disappearance.

The Lodge vs. Knowlton case involved a case filed in New Hampshire Supreme Court by Bruce Lodge against Col. Harold Knowlton of the New Hampshire State Police.

Lodge had attempted to obtain an accident report regarding an accident involving a police chief while operating his cruiser.

In conclusion, the court determined the six-prong test of 5 U.S.C. 552 (B) (7) provided a good standard to effectuate the balance of interests required by RSA CH. 91-A with regard to police investigatory files.

One of the elements of the six-prong test involves invasion of privacy. The court also suggested a new hearing be held.

Hester, when contacted Friday morning, declined to comment and referred questions to David Ruhoff of the New Hampshire Attorney General's Office.

Ruhoff at first said he could not make any comments in any official capacity.

He then relented when told state police said he would be the one to discuss the freedom of information act request refusal.

Ruhoff did say because it's an ongoing investigation, even the accident report cannot be released. Wood was not available for comment.

As for Murray, he does not understand why authorities won't release any information about his daughter, if her case is not being investigated as a criminal case.

State police have continually stated they consider it a missing person's case.

So, Murray does not understand why they won't release information about her case as well as the police reports regarding her accident.

He wonders whose privacy state police and police are worried about violating.

"What's so criminal about an accident report, if it's (being classified as) a missing person's case?" Murray asked. "They are denying me information which may help me."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 128
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:11:28 pm
Comments by Sharon Raush

About August 2004

www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html

Maura Murray has been missing since Monday, February 9, 2004. There was a light snow falling, 2 1/2 feet of snow on the ground and a temperature of 12 degrees and falling when Maura slid off Route 112 into a snow bank on a hairpin turn around 7:30 PM near Haverhill, NH. A motorist who also lived nearby offered her assistance, but she refused. He reported that she appeared to be shaken, but uninjured and told him that she was going to call AAA. However, cell phones do not work in the area. The motorist called the police who arrived approximately 10 minutes later to find Maura gone and her car locked. Along with Maura, the only items missing were her cell phone, bank card, cash, driver's license and a small black backpack. The cell phone and the bank card have not been used. Law enforcement did not notify Maura's family until 24 hours after the accident and no search was begun for her until after 36 hours. At that time, an air scent dog traced her 100 yards on the road and lost her scent. The area in which Maura went missing is in The White Mountain National Forest. The area is sparsely populated in summer and during the winter most homes are vacant. There are many mountains, ravines, rivers and creeks. According to the police there are no leads as to her whereabouts. It is as if she vanished into thin air. Maura will be missing 6 months on Monday, August 9. Many friends, family and loved ones have been praying for Maura's safe return. Maura's father has spent every weekend searching for her since she disappeared.

I ask you to forward this message to everyone you know to join us in earnest prayer that God will bring Maura home. I am also asking that you request your church to have a moment of prayer for Maura in your worship service on Sunday, August 8th and to request that each member make it a priority to pray throughout the week that God will comfort, strengthen and provide answers to all of the people that love Maura as they deal with her being missing for 6 months . Most importantly, please pray that God will bring Maura home. We fear that Maura is no longer with us, but we need her home. Please help us and give God the glory!

I would appreciate your reply to me at mauramissing@hotmail.com if you feel led to pray and/or to ask your church to pray with us.

Thank you.

With Hope in Christ,

Sharon Rausch

"Our help is from the Lord, who created heaven and earth." Psalm 24:8
Title: Newspaper Articles # 129
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:13:31 pm
The Caledonian-Record

Thursday, August 5, 2004

Family, Friends No Closer To Finding Maura Murray

By Gary E. Lindsley

Maura Murray's friends and family are no closer to finding out what has happened to the 22-year-old nursing student than they were six months ago after learning she disappeared the frigid night of Feb. 9.

Murray, a University of Massachusetts at Amherst student, has not been seen since she was involved in a minor car accident after failing to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve on very rural Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

Her father, Fred, still travels to New Hampshire every weekend to search for his daughter.

Maura left her dorm room the afternoon of Feb. 9.

She had researched destinations in Vermont and New Hampshire on her computer before leaving in her father's black 1996 Saturn.

Maura had some of her semester's books with her as well as expensive diamond jewelry and other items. She also had alcohol in the vehicle.

An area contractor, months after the accident, told investigators with New Hampshire State Police he may have seen her running along Route 112 toward the North Woodstock area, about four to five miles from the accident scene.

Maura has not been heard from or seen since - except for a reported sighting in a bar in Rochester in early July.

Although two women have stated they believed the woman was Maura, state police have discounted the alleged sighting without saying why.

Since Maura disappeared, she has not accessed her bank accounts nor used her ATM card.

State police are treating Maura's disappearance as a missing person case and have not brought the FBI into the case.

Fred Murray has spent nearly every weekend searching for her.

Monday marks six months since Maura disappeared and family and friends are asking people around the nation to pray for her.

Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Maura's boyfriend, said Maura's friends, family and loved ones have been praying for Maura's safe return.

Now, they are asking for others to join with them in the hopes Maura will be safely returned to them.

"I am also asking that you request your church to have a moment of prayer for Maura in your worship service on Sunday, Aug. 8, and to request that each member make it a priority to pray throughout the week that God will comfort, strengthen and provide answers to all of the people that love Maura as they deal with her being missing for six months," Rausch said. "Most importantly, please pray that God will bring Maura home.

"We fear that Maura is no longer with us, but we need her home," she continued. "Please help us."

Rausch said she has sent out 350 e-mails to churches in Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and across the country.

She said she has received between 75 and 100 responses, including two from churches in Haverhill, Mass., stating people will be praying for Maura as Monday marks the sixth month since she was last seen.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 130
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:15:35 pm
Massachusetts Daily Collegian

September 9, 2004

UMass student still missing since winter

By Dan O'Brien, Collegian Staff

For the parents of many University of Massachusetts students, the start of the school year marks the beginning of a separation period, at least until the holidays. But while some parents are lingering on their child's last goodbye hug, the family of one UMass student is still trying to piece together the disappearance of their daughter from the University campus last winter.

22-year-old Maura Murray, a nursing student, is still missing after 7 months. It was February 9, 2004 when the Hanson, Mass. resident packed up her belongings from her Kennedy Hall dorm room, drove her car to New Hampshire and got into a minor car accident. After the accident, she vanished without a trace. She has not been seen or heard from since that cold February evening.

Maura's parents, Laurie and Fred Murray, have said all along that her daughter had excellent grades. Murray was a Dean's list student a track star in high school, and a close friend to many.

Murray has described her daughter's relationship with her boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rauch of Oklahoma as "a very, very good relationship." However, Maura's family and friends suspect foul play was involved in the young woman's disappearance.

Events leading up to her disappearance

There are clues indicating that Maura Murray may have had some personal troubles just before she left UMass.

Maura allegedly left her campus job the Thursday before she disappeared and co-workers described her state as upset and troubled, according to WCVB-TV.

In an interview with WCVB-TV, Maura's older sister, Kathleen Murray of Hanover, Mass., admitted that she had a phone conversation with Maura that evening.

"It was just a regular phone call. It made no difference to me. It was just Maura calling me, that was that. I told her about my day and quarreling with my fiance'," Murray said. "I don't know what I could have done to upset her... Seriously, I think she just wanted to get out of work."

New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza is one of the lead investigators on the Murray case. He disputes Kathleen Murray's statement about her sister trying to leave work early.

"It wasn't a case where she called the supervisor and said, 'Listen, I've had a bad phone call...' The supervisor on her own initiative said, 'Why don't you take the rest of the night off? I'll walk you to your dorm.' So clearly she was upset," Scarinza told WCVB-TV.

It was less than four days later when Maura decided to leave UMass. She apparently had some type of plan before for her departure.

In the early morning hours of Monday, Feb. 9th Maura performed an Internet search for directions to Burlington, VT and the Berkshires.

"Sometime between Sunday and Monday morning, she packed up all her belongings in her dorm room, to include taking all her pictures off the walls, taking everything out of her bureaus, [and] put them all in boxes [and] left [them] on her bed," Scarinza told WCVB-TV, "[She] left a personal note to her boyfriend on top of the boxes."

Maura Murray's vehicle was then found in the town of Haverhill, N.H. crashed and abandoned on the side of the road. Her doors were reportedly locked and a few items had been removed from her car.

Authorities did not begin their search for Murray until Feb. 11, to the dismay of her parents.

A possible link

It was only about one month after Maura's disappearance when another disappearance of a young woman shocked the northern New England region where Maura was last seen.

17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Montgomery, VT disappeared March 19th after leaving her restaurant job.

About one hour after she left work, her car was found backed into an abandoned barn about 1 1/2 miles away. Her disappearance took place only 90 miles from where Maura was last seen.

The Murray family has publicly said they are not disregarding the idea that there may be a link between the two disappearances.

"If you think about it, both of them had minor accidents and they both disappeared without a trace," Laurie Murray told the Massachusetts Daily Collegian.

Both the families of Murray and Maitland have publicly said they want their respective law enforcement agencies to investigate further if there is a missing link between the two disappearances. Police are not dismissing the link theory, but have said it is unlikely.

"It's hard to believe you'd have that bad of luck," said Scarinza, "We are open minded to anything, but there is no evidence to suggest the cases are related."

No new leads

On July 13th, a search of the woods was conducted, which involved about 90 people. It covered a one-mile radius from where Maura was last seen. Officials recovered several articles of clothing, but none of the items found were linked to Murray.

"As of this date, none of the clothing items recovered appears to have belonged to Maura or appear to be linked to her disappearance. Of the miscellaneous items that were located by the searchers to include several bottles and other products, they do not appear to have any relevance to Maura's disappearance," said Scarinza.

Laurie Murray recently reiterated that no new information has been found. "We continue to never give up hope and we pray," Murray said.

Scarinza said he is hoping someone from UMass might come forward with new information regarding Maura's disappearance. His hope is that Maura did confide in someone as to why she decided to leave school.

"We don't know why Maura left school... Clearly it was her intention to leave school. Clearly she had a destination in mind when she came up north. What clearly did not make sense was that she didn't confide in anyone," Scarinza said.

He went on to say that he is not worried about finding alcohol or drugs if someone were to speak up. "I'm just worried about finding Maura," he said.

Anyone who has any information about the disappearance of Maura Murray is urged to call New Hampshire State Police Sgt. Robert Bruno. His phone number is 603-846-3333. All calls can remain confidential.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 131
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:17:38 pm
Umass Magazine Online Fall 2004

Missing Maura - seeking peace

By Katy LaConte

’04

ON FEB. 9, UMASS AMHERST SENIOR Maura Murray left campus and headed north. At around 7 p.m. she got into a car accident on rural Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H. The damage was minor. A local man stopped and offered her assistance but she declined. He called the police anyway. When the police arrived 10 minutes later, her car was locked. Her belongings were still inside. Maura was gone.

Dear Maura,

Who would miss me if I were gone? It’s a question that I’ve asked myself when I’m depressed. It speaks about the fascination we all have with life and death. As morbid as it may seem, that’s why so many are interested in your story. They’re drawn to it. Your story is so personal, yet universal. Your face has been in the minds of all who love you, and on the lips of so many who never even knew you. So if you were to ask yourself ‘who would miss you?’ the answer would be simple.

I remember the first time I saw you looking back at me. It was from your missing persons poster on the wall. I saw you as I waited in line at the campus Dunkin’ Donuts. My campus. Your campus, too. I wondered if you’d waited in this very line. I looked harder at the picture as I waited, trying to pull out the exact change from my wallet for a hot chocolate. You wore a black button-down shirt and your hair was pulled back in a ponytail. Eyes: blue-green. Hair: brown. Weight: approx 115 lbs. Your attributes were listed as if on a rap sheet. Height: 5' 7", just one inch taller than me. Age 21, like me. Last seen wearing a dark-colored coat. I found myself wondering ridiculous things, like are you one of those girls who always wears her hair in a ponytail? Do you think you look best in dark colors and wear them often, or is it just a coincidence that you wore them in both this picture as well as the last time you were seen? Whose shoulder is that in the picture, who got cut out? Did that person make you smile like that or is that your picture-taking smile? I imagined you the last time that anyone saw you. And then suddenly you’re gone from the picture in my head, now just an empty dark road, eerily lit by falling snow. Your car abandoned. I get a chill.

All this from seeing your poster. All this from a stranger. I can only imagine what your family must be feeling. At one point they even moved into a hotel close to where your car was found, just in case. They’ve agonized over the details. They still do. They rifled through your belongings, searching for clues, anything to tell them what happened to you. Your father searched for you 14 weekends straight. You were lost in the snow. Spring came and went. Now we’re into the humid days of summer. This past weekend is the first time that your Dad took a weekend off. People you’ve never met are left wondering. You’ve become famous for all the wrong reasons. The question isn’t who is missing you, but rather, who isn’t. http://www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html
Title: Newspaper Articles # 132
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:19:41 pm
Montell William Show

October 29, 2004

Vanished...Without a Trace

They were going about their daily lives when in a flash - they disappeared. Fred's daughter Maura was also his close friend. When she had gotten into a car accident, he readily lent her his own vehicle. Twenty-four hours later, while driving to New Hampshire, the car slid out of control on a patch of ice and Maura hit a tree. Nearby witnesses to the accident called the police and saw Maura in the car up until 2 minutes before the police cars arrived on the scene. By the time they got there, Maura had mysteriously disappeared. Meghan's mom, Janis, disappeared after a family dinner she had with her daughter and her ex-husband. She drove home with her boyfriend from the meal and was never heard from again. We'll also speak with 3 siblings who miss their charismatic sister, Brooke, who disappeared late one morning while she was outside her sister's apartment complex. Plus we'll talk to Kelly and Jim whose son was last seen taking in the garbage cans from his parents' home.

Fred: His daughter, Maura, disappeared in February of this year after she got into a car accident. If anyone has information on the disappearance of Maura Murray, please contact the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636

Sharon: A friend of the family, whose son was dating Maura

Meghan: Her mother, Janis, disappeared 4 years ago after having dinner with her family. If you have any information on the disappearance of Janis Stavros, please contact The Salt Lake County Sheriff at 801-743-7000

Shannon, Spencer, Jessica: Their sister, Brooke, disappeared May of this year while she was working outside at her sister's apartment complex. If you have any information on the disappearance of Brooke Wilberger please contact the National Center for Missing And Exploited Children at 1-800-THE LOST

Kelly & Jim: Their son, Jason, disappeared 3 ½ years ago early in the morning just before going to work. If you have any information on the disappearance of Jason Jolkowski, please contact the Omaha Crime Stoppers at (402) 444-STOP

Kym: President of the National Center For Missing Adults (www.missingadults.org) who can be reached online or by telephone at 1-800-690-FIND
Title: Newspaper Articles # 133
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:21:44 pm
New Hampshire Sunday News

November 14, 2004

Looking for Louise's murderer

By Lorna Colquhoun

GORHAM -- As winter folds over the higher reaches of the White Mountains, friends of a Canadian woman murdered three years ago returned to Pinkham Notch last week to remember a vibrant and adventurous woman.

Along for the ride with Denis Masson and Marie Pinault are the feelings of melancholy, nostalgia and anger that someone has gotten away with the murder of Louise Chaput.

It is the couple's second anniversary trip and accompanying them this year was Chaput's daughter, Corinne, a college student studying to become a school teacher. Her only other trip to the area was during the search for her mother.

"I never came back," she said. "Before, I was not ready, but now it's OK. I don't want to be afraid to come here."

Hiking weekend

Louise Chaput lived in Sherbrooke, Que., a couple of hours north of the White Mountains. On Nov. 15, 2001, she decided to spend the weekend doing some hiking and stayed at the Appalachian Mountain Club in Pinkham Notch. When she didn't return home that Monday, her friends and family reported her missing.

A search was quickly launched. While her car was found immediately, it wasn't until almost four days later that her body was found on the popular Glen Boulder trail, just off Route 16 and about a quarter of a mile from the AMC base camp.

Louise Chaput had been stabbed to death. Her killer has never been found.

Pinault and Chaput were longtime friends. It is Pinault and her husband, Masson, who now make an annual trek from their home in Ottawa to the mountains on the anniversary of Chaput's death, as a way to remember and to remind others that the case has never been solved.

There is also a hope that whoever is responsible will someday step forward and answer a simple question: Why Louise Chaput?

"It is amazing to me that someone is still walking around," Pinault said. "I think there is a sick person out there. I think there is a guy out there who will do this again anytime."

No new leads

Last year, on the second anniversary, the couple tacked up hundreds of flyers from Conway north to Gorham, asking for information.

State police Detective Chuck West said Friday that very few leads have come in recent months.

"We're still working on it, but there is nothing new," he said. "We used to get information in spurts, but it's been about six months since we got anything new."

Earlier this year, police got a warrant to search a Berlin flea market, looking for Louise Chaput's backpack, but it turned out to be nothing, he said.

Her backpack, which is blue with an internal frame and a Canadian flag on the outside, has never been recovered, nor have her keys to her Ford Focus or her sleeping bag.

"It's a challenge for us," West said. "Someone is out there."

West has also worked for the past nine months on the disappearance of Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts nursing student who vanished following a minor car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill last February.

While both cases are troubling and remain open, West said there is nothing indicating that the two cases are related.

Pinault keeps in regular contact with West. While time has eased the sorrow of losing her dearest friend, Pinault says she will continue to do what she can to make sure Louise Chaput is not forgotten and to one day see someone arrested for her death.

Doubts about justice

It is a sentiment shared by Chaput's daughter.

"I have lost confidence in justice," Corinne Chaput said, "because we didn't find what happened. It has disturbed my life -- I am afraid to walk at night and when I am alone. She is not here in my life and I miss her. I don't have a mother anymore."

Masson and Pinault say they will return to the White Mountains every November until Chaput's killer is found.

Pinault said her other mission during these trips is to remind women, especially those who hike alone, that the person who killed her friend is still at large.

"This is our way of remembering Louise," Chaput said. "We are not going to put (the memories) in a box."

-- Anyone with information about Louise Chaput's murder is asked to call the state police at 846-3333.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 134
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:23:47 pm
The Patriot Ledger

Friday, November 19, 2004

Missing Hanson woman's last call yet to be investigated: N.H. condo owners say police made no effort to contact them since February. By Joe McGee

HANSON - The family of a missing 22-year-old is demanding to know why police apparently failed to investigate one of the last telephone calls she made on the day she disappeared.

At 1 p.m. on Feb. 9, Maura Murray called a Wakefield couple who own a condominium at the Seasons at Attitash resort in Bartlett, N.H., that was for rent. Murray's family has stayed at the resort.

But the couple, Dominic and Linda Salamone, say they have never heard from investigators.

"It's so upsetting," Linda Salamone said last night. ''I was the last person she talked to, so wouldn't I be the first person they would call to at least find out her state of mind?''

Murray made her last call at 2 p.m. on the same day to a toll-free number that offers information about lodging in Stowe, Vt.

Salamone said she did not know about Murray's mysterious disappearance until last month, when the mother of the young woman's boyfriend telephoned to ask about the February call.

"I couldn't even tell her what she said because it was so long ago but I'm assuming she wanted to rent the place," Linda Salamone said.

Sharon Rausch, the mother of Murray's boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch, said she discovered the call to the Salamones last month when she looked over Murray's cell phone bill for February.

"It blew our minds that it's now eight months later and we're finding out that (police) never even called these people," Rausch said.

New Hampshire State Police said the investigator who was given the phone records, Lt. John Scarinza, would not be available for comment until Monday.

This is not the first time the Murray family has criticized the way the investigation has been handled.

In July, Laurie Murray found out from a Patriot Ledger reporter that police had conducted a day-long search for her daughter. Police said they had told her ex-husband, Fred Murray of Weymouth, and assumed he would tell her, but Murray denied in a television interview that he had been notified.

In June, Laurie Murray criticized police for suggesting that her daughter had killed herself or run away. Murray believes her daughter was abducted.

Murray was last seen Feb. 9 in Haverhill, N.H., a small town near the Vermont border, where she crashed her car on Route 112, the Kancamagus Highway. Earlier in the day she left her dormitory at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst without telling anyone why.

Police said Murray was dealing with personal issues, but family members said none of it was serious enough that she would run away.

Bartlett, where the Salamones have their condominium, is about 60 miles east of Haverhill on Route 112.

While the Murrays may have lost faith in the police investigation, they are continuing their effort to find their daughter.

A new website launched last week, www.mauramurray.com, offers information about the case and a forum for people to chat.

"We've already had interest from people," said Kerri Doble Gingras of Marshfield, a relative of Murray who developed the web site with her husband.

"We're hopeful from having a response that at least she's still on people's minds," she said.

Murray's story will be featured on the Montel Williams talk show on a date to be announced.

Over the last month, volunteers have also attached photos of Murray to their mail with information about how to contact police.

But the family is also dealing with another crisis.

Laurie Murray was diagnosed with throat cancer last month and is undergoing 30 days of chemotherapy and radiation.

"Everything comes in numbers. We already had Maura and now this," Murray said. "But I'm a fighter and I'll beat this."

She said she is determined to see her daughter again.

"I want her home for the holidays," she said.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmc...@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 135
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:25:50 pm
The Boston Channel

November 18/19, 2004

Father Keeps Hope Alive In Search For Missing Daughter

Maura Murray Last Seen Feb. 9, 2004

BOSTON -- It's a parent's nightmare come true for a South Shore father.

NewsCenter 5's Liz Brunner reported that Fred Murray's daughter, Maura, has been missing since February. The college student disappeared after making a car trip to rural New Hampshire.

Murray said the police are now treating the case as if it's cold, so he's taken it upon himself to keep hope alive.

Every other weekend for nine months Fred Murray has made the trip from Connecticut to a New Hampshire motel that has become the home base in his search for his missing daughter.

"No one else is looking and the case would just die and be forgotten. I've got to do it. I owe it to my daughter," said Murray.

Maura Murray, 22, an athlete and honors student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was last seen the evening of Feb. 9, 2004, after her car crashed in Haverhill, N.H. Neighbors called the police. One offered the young woman help, but she refused. Within minutes she vanished.

"The people who called in to the police said my daughter was sitting one to two minutes before the cops came, which means all the police had to do was go down the street and grab her," said Murray.

Alcohol was found in the car. Murray said if his daughter was drinking, she probably panicked, afraid she'd get in trouble.

"So she starts walking away," said Murray.

Murray believes his daughter became a victim of foul play.

"They know it was a young girl, they don't call ahead. They let her walk into the national forest. They let a young girl in 12-degree temperatures walk away," he said.

With that, Fred Murray's anger grows. He accused police of waiting too long when they were just minutes away from finding his daughter.

In their search for Maura Murray, New Hampshire State police say the immediate area was searched the night of the accident and neighbors were interviewed. But a ground and air search wasn't conducted until a day and a half later. Murray says that was too late.

"They can't answer why they didn't drive two minutes down the road. It took 38 hours to start the investigation," Murray said.

No footprints were ever found in the woods. Search dogs tracked the woman's scent from the scene of the accident to the next corner.

"Which is right in front of the last guy who spoke to my daughter, and also right in front of the house of the last person to have actually seen my daughter," said Murray.

That person initially told police he didn't see anything the night of Maura Murray's disappearance. Three months later he came forward with different information: He'd seen someone who fit Maura Murray's description walking about five miles away. Murray wonders if the man knows more.

Murray said the police have already made up their minds.

"Suicide, hypothermia or runaway. Back and forth, one to three, nothing about number four -- a bad guy," said Murray.

The day Maura Murray left UMass, she e-mailed her professors that she had a family problem and would be gone for about a week. Rumors flew that she wanted to disappear. Murray thinks she came to New Hampshire, a frequent family destination, to sort something out.

"If she was upset and wanted to get away to find peace, it would be here. It doesn't matter what brought her here to this point. Once she got here, something happened," he said. "My daughter is right there on that poster. If that person came out of the poster, she'd walk right out of it smiling. We were like buddies. I want my buddy back. That's what I'm doing here."

New Hampshire State Police told NewsCenter 5 that they've logged thousands of hours investigating Maura Murray's disappearance, including a number of ground and air searches. The case is active, but at this point, they say there's no reason to believe a crime was committed.

Anyone who has seen Maura or has information about her disappearance is asked to contact either the New Hampshire State Police at (603) 271-3636, or visit www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 136
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:27:53 pm
The Hanson Express

November 24, 2004

Missing Phone Call

By Justin Graeber

Hanson - In what is becoming a long list of frustrations for the family and friends of Maura Murray, it appears that the New Hampshire State Police did not even investigate the final phone call Murray made from her cell phone the day she disappeared.

On February 9, Hanson native and Whitman-Hanson high school graduate Maura Murray slid off the road on a remote highway in New Hampshire near the Vermont border. An eye witness watched her get out of the car and went to call the police, but when he returned Murray was gone. She has not been seen or heard from since.

Members of her family have long been frustrated with the investigation into her disappearance, feeling that the police did not act quickly enough in the hours following her disappearance. The police still maintain that the most likely scenario is that Murray left of her own volition, while the family has always felt she was abducted.

According to Sharon Rausch, the mother of Maura's fiance' Billy Rausch, the last two calls made from Maura's cell phone were to a UMass number and to a couple who is part of a condo association in the area of New Hampshire where Murray appeared headed.

The UMass number is pretty much a dead end for investigators, since the person who lived in the room Maura called in February has most likely moved on.

But the other number is more troubling in its omission from the investigation. The number Maura called belonged to a Wakefield couple, Linda and Domenic Salamone. When Rausch called them, she learned that they rent a condo in the same New Hampshire complex where Murray and her family had often stayed.

Although the call to the Salamones was one of the last Maura Murray made before she went missing, the Salamones only learned of their part in the story when they were contacted by Rausch, nearly eight months later. According to Rausch, they were appalled" by the lack of action by the police and were willing to talk to the press to get the word out that they were never contacted.

Rausch came upon the Salamones' phone number while looking over Maura's phone bills for the month of Feburary. The phone was a gift from Billy Rausch to Maura and was still listed under Sharon Rausch's name.

The reason this recent revelation is so explosive is that it shoots a hole in the State Police's theory that Maura committed suicide or ran away. If Maura was running away for good, it is unlikely that she would be looking to rent a condo in New Hampshire. Before she left the UMass campus, where she was a nursing student, Murray sent a letter to her professors stating that there had been a death in the family and she would need some time off from school. It was later determined that there was no death, and many believe that Murray was simply seeking to get away for a few days to deal with the stress of a recent car crash. But if she was simply seeking a few days' respite, the car crash on that snowy road may have changed the plans.

The Express attempted to contact the state police for this story, but the detective working on the case could not be reached by press time. In the past, the spokesperson for the police has only said that that case was ongoing.

Maura's family has also released a website, www.mauramurray.com. Interested persons can read the latest news, view pictures of Maura, or share information.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 137
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:29:57 pm
The Caledonian-Record

December 10, 2004

Letters To Editor - Please help look for Maura Murray

By Patti Davidson

To the Editor:

'Tis the season to be jolly as family and friends gather to celebrate the holidays. This year has been filled with heartache and sadness for us because we are missing a family member.

While decorating the Christmas tree with my young children I try to pretend everything is OK. Then my 9-year-old son turns to me and says, "Mom, do you think you'll find Maura before Christmas?" I can no longer hold back my tears. My son is now crying and says, "Mom, I feel sad for Maura and her Dad." Comforting him, I tell him we are trying our hardest to find Maura.

His letter to Santa reads, "Dear Santa, please help find Maura for her father."

I am making a plea from my heart asking the people to help us look and find Maura Murray so we can bring her home.

Patti Davidson

Weymouth, Mass.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 138
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:32:00 pm
New Hampshire Sunday News

December 26, 2004

2004: A look back at some of the year's big stories

February

--Maura Murray disappears: The 22-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student has not been seen since the car she was driving went off the road into trees at a sharp curve on Route 112 near the Weathered Barn in Haverhill the evening of Feb. 9. She had locked the car and disappeared in the few minutes it took police to respond to a resident's telephoned report of the accident. Searches of the woods and the nearby Wild Ammonoosuc River -- on the snow-covered ground and after the snow had melted -- have found no trace of Murray.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 139
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:34:03 pm
The New Hampshire Union Leader

January 9, 2005

Father wants police files on missing daughter opened

Stumped in his search for Maura Murray, missing since a cold night 11 months ago when her car went off a North Country road, her father said on Friday that he plans to consult with a lawyer and write a letter to New Hampshire's new governor, John H. Lynch.

Frederick J. Murray of Weymouth, Mass., wrote to Gov. Craig Benson last May, conveying his disappointment that police had been unable to determine what happened to his daughter, who apparently walked away at about 7 p.m. on Feb. 9, 2004, leaving her car alongside Route 112 in North Haverhill, its airbag deployed and the windshield cracked as if her head had struck the glass in the impact with banked-up frozen snow.

Murray said he never got a reply from Benson, although he has heard back from law enforcement authorities who have denied him access to their investigative records.

He has written to New Hampshire Safety Commissioner Richard M. Flynn; New Hampshire state police, the lead investigative agency; Grafton County Sheriff Charles E. Barry, and the police chief at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass., where his daughter was a student. He requested copies of the radio dispatch logs, witness interview reports and "any records with any affiliated law enforcement agency and any information that pertains to Maura Murray and this case."

All the law enforcement authorities denied him access to their files, explaining that the investigative documents he sought were confidential and exempted from the public-records provisions of right-to-know laws.

The most recent response Murray got was a letter dated Jan. 3, from Thomas Andross of the Grafton County Sheriff's Department.

Andross wrote:

"The information requested is part of files that are investigative in nature and release would constitute an unwarranted invasion of privacy under (the right-to-know law). The release and disclosure at this time could interfere with an ongoing investigation."

Said Murray:

"I want to look in those dispatch logs to find out if there is anything that might indicate a direction that they might have overlooked that I might develop. . . . This is not a criminal investigation. This is a missing person investigation. So, why all this secrecy? What is it they don't want me to know?"

At state police headquarters on Friday, requests for comment on the status of the Maura Murray case were referred to Sgt. Thomas J. Yorke. Messages were left at the Troop F station in Twin Mountain for Yorke and Lt. John K. Scarinza. Both have been involved in the investigation, but neither was expected to pick up their messages until tomorrow.

Murray, who has traipsed the woods near the crash site on numerous weekends, followed tips to dead ends and listened to the theories of psychics, worked with relatives and friends to maintain a Web site and gather pledges backing a $40,000 reward offer, said he is now "on the verge of enlisting legal aid in my attempt to get information."

State law provides for a denial of records under the right-to-know law to be appealed to a Superior Court.

Mystery phone call

One piece of the puzzle that Murray believes is in the police records he seeks is the identity of the person who held a certain telephone number on the University of Massachusetts campus on the day his daughter disappeared. Murray said telephone records show she made a call from her cellular telephone to that number the afternoon of Feb. 9, 2004, but the current subscriber did not have that number last year.

"I want to ask the people who had that number what my daughter may have said when she called. I'm trying to figure out her frame of mind," said the frustrated father, remembering better days, when he and his daughter, whose 22nd birthday was on May 4, 2004, would get together on a weekend to hike a trail in the White Mountains.

The call to the phone on the UMass campus was not the only one Maura Murray made the day she disappeared: She talked with Linda Salamone who owns a condominium at the Seasons at Attitash in Bartlett.

(Haverhill, where Murray's car was found, is on the western edge of the state; Bartlett, on the eastern side. One way to get between the two towns is Route 112, which crosses through the White Mountains as the Kancamagus Highway.)

Condo rental call

Salamone, of Wakefield, Mass., did not know she had talked with Maura Murray until Sharon Rausch, working from the cell phone billing records, dialed her number in October. Rausch, of Marengo, Ohio, is the mother of Murray's boyfriend, Army Lt. William Rausch.

"Only then did it all clicked," Salamone said on Friday of how her conversation with Mrs. Rausch last October made her realize she was one of the last people to talk with Murray before she disappeared.

Salamone does not remember details of her conversation with Maura Murray, but presumes it had to do with renting her condo in Bartlett. Salamone said she likely told Murray that the condo was taken because people rent it months in advance of the ski season.

A New Hampshire state police investigator did not contact Salamone until after the Patriot Ledger newspaper in Quincy, Mass., ran a story in November that reported she was among the last people to talk with the missing woman.

Salamone said the state police officer told her he was following up on an earlier call. "He said they had tried to contact me before, but had not left a message then and that their investigation had since taken a different turn." She said she explained to the investigator that the condo is booked months ahead and she could not remember what was said in the 90 seconds or so that she and Maura Murray spoke nine months before.

Family vacation spot

For Fred Murray, it's logical that his daughter would seek to stay at the condominium complex at Attitash, where the family had vacationed in the past, and disturbing that investigators did not follow through on the call until prompted by a newspaper story.

"There is nobody Maura knows up there. She was looking for a place to stay," Murray said, adding that his daughter had taken extra clothing with her and some school books.

"This indicated that my daughter had a purpose (in leaving school abruptly on a Monday to travel to New Hampshire.) The police never followed up on a phone call she made on the afternoon she left. If they were not going to do something as elemental as that, what makes you think they will follow through with a proper investigation?"

In past conversations he has had with investigators, Murray said, "They keep shifting from hypothermia, to, 'this is a case of a runaway,' to, 'it's a suicide.' . . . Anything to avoid Number 4, which is the 'bad guy' alternative. If it's a bad guy who came along when she was there alone that night, the onus is upon them to do something and they can't."
Title: Newspaper Articles # 140
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 12, 2019, 05:36:06 pm
The Caledonian-Record

January 17, 2005

Letters To Editor - A grateful father

By Fred Murray

To the Editor:

So many people have selflessly and enthusiastically given of themselves and their time that if force of will were enough by itself, then Maura would have been back with us many months ago. When people ask me if there is anything that they can do, I tell them that I know they would already have done it if there were. Your universally overwhelming support is a striking demonstration yet again of the inherent goodness of people.

You can sense my gratitude, but I want your "thank you" to come to you when you look in the mirror and see reflected a person who, by choice, interrupted his or her life to try to help another human being in trouble. If there is any worthier motivation than that, we'd all be hard pressed to name what it is.

In Deep Appreciation,

Fred Murray

Father of Maura Murray, Missing Person since 02/09/04

Weymouth, Mass.
Title: Newspaper Articles #141
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:10:45 am
Massachusetts Daily Collegian

January 26, 2005

Missing student’s parents angry over police investigation

It has been almost one year since University of Massachusetts junior Maura Murray vanished without a trace. As her family and friends continue to hope and pray for her safe return, they have also expressed anger with the New Hampshire State Police who allegedly botched the investigation.

The 21-year-old nursing student from Hanson, Mass. packed up her belongings in her Kennedy Hall dorm room on February 9, 2004. In recent months, the Murray family has discovered that police have made several critical errors in the investigation, and allegedly lied to the news media.

At approximately 7 p.m. on Feb. 9th, Maura was driving on route 112 in Haverhill, NH, police said. As she was trying to negotiate a curve, her car slid off the road.

According to witnesses, after the crash Maura appeared to be frightened, but physically unharmed. A passing school bus driver stopped and asked Maura if she needed help, but she refused saying she had already called “Triple A” from her cell phone. However, there was no cell phone service in that area. The bus driver said he drove a short distance to his home and called police, but Maura had left the scene before they arrived. It appeared as if she had disappeared into the cold night.

Neither the New Hampshire State Police nor Haverhill, NH Police questioned anybody who lived in the vicinity of where Maura was last seen until 36 hours after her disappearance. This is just one in a series of critical errors that that has angered the Murray family.

In a June interview with WCVB-TV, the police officer in charge of the investigation, Lt. John Scarinza of the New Hampshire State Police, Troop F, claimed that authorities had found a note in Maura’s dorm room that she had wrote to her boyfriend, Army Lt. Billy Rausch of Ohio, indicating troubles in their relationship.

“Sometime between Sunday and Monday morning, she packed up all her belongings in her dorm room, to include taking all her pictures off the walls, taking everything out of her bureaus, [and] put them all in boxes [and] left [them] on her bed,” Scarinza told WCVB-TV, “[She] left a personal note to her boyfriend on top of the boxes.”

Maura’s mother, Laurie Murray, told the Daily Collegian in August that the relationship between her daughter and Rausch was a “very, very good relationship.”

Raush’s mother, Sharon Rausch, reiterated that statement in a recent interview. She said there was a point where the couple’s relationship was rocky in the spring of 2002, but they had resolved their problems by summer and had a good relationship since then.

Her son arrived at Maura’s dorm room with police just two days after she went missing. He said there was no recent letters to him from Maura that were found. “There is no note,” Sharon Raush said.

Maura’s father, Fred Murray, sent a letter to New Hampshire Governor Craig Benson on May 21, 2004 asking him to persuade State Police to receive assistance from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the search for his daughter. Murray never received a response.

Since then, Murray has applied for a Freedom of Information Act in order to receive more information about the investigation.

“After writing to the governor, I appealed again to the attorney general and the district attorney of Grafton County, but I don’t expect anything,” Murray said.

Murray has been traveling to New Hampshire to search for his daughter almost every weekend since her disappearance.

“This place is like the old west,” Murray said as he described the atmosphere of Northern New Hampshire.

Murray said part of his search has included hanging out in local bars in hopes to overhear a conversation in which someone mentions something about Maura. Murray said he has been actively investigating his daughter’s disappearance himself because he does not trust the police to conduct a proper investigation. “These guys can’t catch a cold,” he said.

Murray said his main frustration is that police refuse to investigate “scenario number 4.” Lt. Scarniza told the Daily Collegian in August that the police investigation has led them to believe Maura “left on her own volition.” This would lead one to believe Maura either ran away, committed suicide, or suffered from hypothermia. The Murrays disagreed and believe she was abducted.

Fred Murray believes the police do not want to admit there is a predator in their small, rural community.

“There’s a bad guy on their turf in their backyard,” Murray said. “The skunk is on their doorstep.”

While the Murray family has been disputing facts about the police investigation, yet another troubling piece of information came to light in October 2004 when Sharon Rausch was reviewing Maura’s cell phone records. The cell phone was given to Maura by her boyfriend, which was purchased in his mother’s name. Rausch came across the last two numbers Maura called three hours before she disappeared.

The first number was to a UMass Amherst dormitory. The number appeared to be a dead end for investigators because the person who lived there likely moved on.

Rausch decided to call the second number, which was to Dominic and Linda Salamone of Wakefield, Mass. In the course of Raush’s conversation with Linda Salamone, she claims that she realized the Salamones own a condo in Bartlett, NH — the same condo association the Murray family vacationed in years past.

Although the phone call was one of the last Maura made before she went missing, the Salamones said police never once contacted them. The couple did not learn of their part of the story until being contacted by Rausch, eight months after Maura vanished.

“I was speechless,” Rausch recalled, “and that doesn’t happen to me very often.”

Fred Murray explained that this new information is another piece of evidence that points to Maura being abducted.

“She had a destination,” Murray said. “She was on route 112, which goes right to Bartlett… [The police] will do anything to avoid saying ‘number 4.'”

This new information does not back up the NH State Police theory that Maura ran away or committed suicide because it would be unlikely for her to rent a condo if she was planning on running away. Before she left UMass, she contacted her professors stating there was a death in the family, when there was no such death.

Many people believe she was taking time off from school to deal with the stress of a recent car crash in which she caused $10,000 worth of damage to her father’s vehicle. In addition, Maura’s school textbooks were found in the vehicle.

Sharon Rausch and Fred Murray have both said they could not be unhappier with the police investigation.

“It’s clear they have their own agenda and it has nothing to do with the truth or finding Maura,” said Rausch.

More bad news hit the Murray family this past October. Maura’s mother, Laurie Murray was diagnosed with throat cancer. According to Rausch, she has already undergone 30 days of chemotherapy and radiation treatment and has been doing better. Rausch said Murray has told people she is going to beat the cancer so she can see Maura come home.

The Daily Collegian has made several attempts to contact New Hampshire State Police for information regarding this article, but calls were not returned.

Rausch asks anyone who would like to help keep hope for Maura to pray, wear a blue ribbon, or light an electric- or battery-operated candle until she comes home.

On their official Web site, New Hampshire State Police have asked anyone with information regarding Maura’s disappearance to call Sgt. Robert Bruno at 603-846-3333. The Murray family asks those with information to either call police or contact them through their “Maura’s Missing” Web site at http://www.mauramurray.com
Title: Newspaper Articles #142
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:12:25 am
The Patriot Ledger

February 9, 2005

Gone a Year Ago Today - Missing Hanson woman's family prods officials; Treat it as crime, they urge N.H.

By Joe McGee

It was one year ago that Maura Murray of Hanson disappeared in the snowy woods of New Hampshire. Her father and other family members were in New Hampshire today, trying again to get authorities to treat her disappearance as a crime.

Murray, then 22, left her dormitory at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst on Feb. 9, 2004, and traveled to New Hampshire for reasons that are unclear.

That evening her car skidded off the road in Haverhill, N.H., but by the time police arrived she was gone without a trace. There were no footprints left around the snowy scene and only one witness saw Murray for a brief moment. Inside her car there were only a few belongings and bottles of alcohol.

The New Hampshire State Police have labeled Murray a missing person, but her family and others close to her believe she met with foul play. They have asked police to treat her disappearance as a criminal case.

‘‘I just want them to have some ownership of the situation and everything that has evolved over the past 12 months,'' said Murray's boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch of Oklahoma.

Murray's father, Fred Murray, her brother, Freddie, and her sister, Kathleen, were among those who planned to deliver a written appeal to Gov. John Lynch today asking that he release records pertaining to her case. The group was to then travel to Haverhill to place a missing person poster and ribbon where she was last seen.

Later this evening, friends and family will observe a moment of prayer for Maura during an Ash Wednesday Mass at St. Joseph the Worker Church in Hanson.

Over the past year Murray's mother, Laurie Murray, developed cancer. Murray said she is too ill to travel to New Hampshire today. She said that if she could speak to Gov. Lynch she'd keep her message simple.

‘‘This is definitely foul play and the FBI should be on this and I'm very disappointed that this didn't happen sooner,'' Murray said.

Rausch, Murray's boyfriend, says the family should at least be entitled to copies of police records to prove that everything was handled properly.

Fred Murray filed a records request with the New Hampshire attorney general's office seeking release of all pertinent records. That request was denied.

The Murrays' suspicions of a botched investigation were heightened in October when they began calling numbers listed on Murray's cell phone records from last February. It turned out that the last person she called was Linda Salamone of Wakefield, whose condo in Bartlett, N.H., Murray wanted to rent.

Salamone told The Patriot Ledger in November that she was never interviewed by police. This is one of the details the Murrays want to discuss with police.

‘‘It seems more than a reasonable request,'' Rausch said of the records request.

‘‘They said there is no foul play involved and no leads so I would think there wouldn't be a valid reason why they couldn't be released,'' he said.

New Hampshire State Police investigators handling the case could not be reached for comment yesterday.

The Murrays are encouraging the public to E-mail Lynch this week to ask that officials re-examine the case with the assistance of the FBI. They also request that everyone display a blue ribbon on car antennae, rear view mirrors and homes as a reminder to pray for Maura.
Title: Newspaper Articles #143
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:13:03 am
The Republican

Wednesday, February 9, 2005

Parents still seek missing daughter

By Holly Angelo

hangelo@repub.com

A year ago today, University of Massachusetts-Amherst nursing student Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass., crashed her car into a tree on a rural road in Haverhill, N.H. and disappeared.

Her family will mark the sad anniversary with a vigil at the accident site on Route 112 and a Mass later in the day. Murray's father, Fred J. Murray of Weymouth, Mass., will start the day in Concord, N.H., asking Gov. John Lynch to assist in releasing to him state police records regarding the investigation. The state police say those records should remain in their hands so the investigation is not jeopardized.

"If the police aren't looking for my daughter and I'm the only one looking for her I need that information," Murray said yesterday during a phone interview from Haverhill. "I'm asking the governor to either release the records to me or have the state police declare it a criminal investigation. Or, I'd like the governor to ask the attorney general to accept the help the FBI offered."

Lt. John K. Scarinza, commander of State Police Troop F in Twin Mountain, N.H., said the case is very much open and the FBI has been used during the investigation.

"I certainly understand the family's frustrations, but it's not for any lack of effort on our part," Scarinza said yesterday. "It is absolutely an open investigation. We work on it every day."

Scarinza said there are no new leads on where Murray might be. He said it is technically a missing person case because police have not been able to develop leads that point to a criminal case. However, the case is being investigated like a criminal case, he said.

Murray was 21 when she disappeared. A witness to the car accident, which left Murray's 1996 Saturn undrivable, said Murray was unharmed. The witness left the accident scene to call police. When the witness returned, Murray was gone.

Before leaving UMass, Murray e-mailed her professors to tell them she was heading home for the week because of a death in the family, but there was no death in the family. She also packed up her dorm room.

"What is hard to understand at this point in time is why Maura left UMass essentially without telling anyone why she was leaving," Scarinza said. "That is sometimes to me the bigger mystery. No one seems to understand what was going on in her life that she decided to pick up, pack up and leave."

Scarinza asks anyone with any type of information about Murray to call (603) 846-5517.
Title: Newspaper Articles #144
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:13:41 am
Fred Murray Letter to Governor Lynch

February 9, 2005

Mr. Frederick Murray

Governor John Lynch

Office of the Governor

State House

25 Capitol Street

Concord NH 03301

Governor Lynch:

Today, February 9, 2005 marks the one year point of my daughter, Maura Murray’s unlikely and highly suspicious disappearance following a minor car accident on Route 112 in North Haverhill, New Hampshire.

The investigative body, New Hampshire State Police Troop F of Grafton County, has followed up its astonishingly careless go-through-the-motions response with an unnaturally steadfast refusal to communicate on the matter since. Their investigation includes not questioning neighbors who live one hundred yards from and in sight of the accident scene until 10 days had passed, and this only after my family and friends had spoken to these people and expressed our shock about it to the police. My daughter could have walked right by or have been picked up in a vehicle by the wrong person(s) in full view of these houses. Not even the fact that their tracking dog lost Maura’s scent squarely before these properties, one of which was owned by the last person who talked to Maura, and another by the last person to actually see her, was enough to provoke the most elementary of basic investigatory technique.

Phone records reveal that Maura called a couple who rent their condominium in Bartlett, New Hampshire, where our family has vacationed for decades, just before she left the University of Massachusetts and headed directly that way last February 9. When I recently discovered that these folks had never even been contacted by Troop F it felt as if I had just been struck across the face with a two-by-four.

I remain convinced also that police have not fully developed a lead given to them concerning a local man who claimed he knew what had happened to “that girl” and disclosed the location where she had been held and by whom.

Law Enforcement’s decision on this case from its inception has been to insist that you can take your pick of three possible happenstances: suicide, runaway, or hyperthermia victim but not consider the fourth which is the probability, rather than the possibility, that is, that a bad guy grabbed her and they can’t catch him. To support their diversion the commander of Troop F twice stated during The Chronicle Program on Channel 5 in Boston that Maura wrote a final letter to her boyfriend and left it in a prominent place in her dormitory room. This clearly suggests the traditional “suicide letter”, but the deception is that she never wrote or left such a letter at all and the police were fully cognizant of this fact at that time.

The pattern certainly doesn’t indicate adherence to accepted and recommended police procedure. To date the high law enforcement officials in Concord have reacted like ostriches to this pseudo-investigation by your Troop F. I am left with a hollow, gut-wrenching sensation resulting from finally knowing for sure that the people responsible for finding my daughter are not even submitting a mail-it-in effort on her behalf. Worse still is that they remain determined to not accept the offer of meaningful participation extended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation which is strangely odd indeed.

I am appealing to you, sir, to ask Attorney General Kelly Ayotte to authorize the release of the records in this case to me through my petition under the Freedom of Information Act and the New Hampshire Right to Know Law RSA CH 91-A. I am basing this plea on the present classification of my daughter’s case as a missing person situation and not as a criminal investigation. What could be the nature of this which must be so zealously veiled from view and the motivation prompting such secrecy?

With no informational resources available I am left to desperately search for Maura all by myself. How can I do this if the police sit idly on the applicable evidence? Take, for example, her computer. If I could get it back, I might be able to discern who she contacted on that last afternoon and perhaps discover a new direction to follow. It’s one thing if Troop F isn’t willing to be part of the solution, but please don’t allow them to continue to be part of the problem.

Governor Lynch, you represent my final hope to help my little girl. I pray that you will regard reacting favorably to my entreaty, not so much as your legal obligation, but as a parent, your moral responsibility.

Hopefully,

Frederick J. Murray
Title: Newspaper Articles #145
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:14:14 am
WCAX

February 9, 2005

Father Of Missing Woman Meets With Lynch - Police Don't Believe Foul Play Involved

CONCORD, N.H. -- The father of a Massachusetts woman who disappeared a year ago met with Gov. John Lynch on Wednesday to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation.

Fred Murray, whose daughter Maura vanished after a minor car accident in Haverhill, wants state police to release their records so he can pursue leads himself.

"I asked, failing that, to have it declared a criminal investigation rather than a missing person investigation, and, if he didn't want to do that, I asked him to accept the offer of the FBI to come in," Murray said after the meeting with Lynch.

Lynch made no commitments on the specific requests.

"I told Mr. Murray that I will look into the situation, and I promised to get back to him as soon as I possibly can and that's how we left it," he said.

Maura, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, was last seen on Feb. 9, 2004, walking away from her car on Route 112 in Haverhill. Police said they have no evidence of foul play and have searched the area repeatedly.

"Literally thousand and thousands of hours have been invested in the search for Maura Murray," said state police Lt. John Scarinza of Troop F, which is handling the investigation.

Murray was highly critical of state police and said he's heard nothing from the investigators in six months.

"I am the investigation. That's why I want the information," he said.

Scarinza said his troopers talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear. Murray's claim he hadn't heard from them in six months is "absolutely inaccurate," he said.

Scarinza said the investigation continues. "We work on it, we talk about it every day as miscellaneous leads come in."

Murray's family believes someone picked her up on the road. They have searched the area many times and called in a psychic who said she believes Murray was murdered by a serial killer.

Murray said he and some supporters would return to the site of Maura's disappearance after leaving the Statehouse.

Murray said he planned to tie a new ribbon on a tree near the accident site and a clergyman would say a prayer. He said the hardest part of marking the anniversary would be listening to a song composed by a friend of Maura's.

But he was optimistic after his meeting with Lynch.

"At least I have more hope than I had before and that's why I came," he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #146
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:14:48 am
WHDH

February 9, 2005

Missing Woman's Father Meets With Governor - Murray Last Seen In Haverhill, N.H.

BOSTON -- One year ago Wednesday, University of Massachusetts student Maura Murray disappeared in the woods of New Hampshire.

NewsCenter 5's Janet Wu reported that it has been a painful year for her family, and her father, Fred Murray, is demanding answers from the governor.

Fred Murray said that he couldn't believe that his daughter ran away or committed suicide, as New Hampshire police contend. He came to the Statehouse in New Hampshire to ask the governor to intervene.

"I don't want the police just to sit on it. They have evidence that they are not using that I need. If they are not going to part of the solution, I don't want them to be part of the problem," he said.

He said that police have refused to give him copies of investigators' notes. His daughter disappeared after her car crashed into a tree in Haverhill, N.H. He said that witnesses spoke with her a few minutes before police arrived at the scene.

"When police got there, she was no more than 100 yards down the street. She is heading off into the national forest. There is no body to help, nowhere to hide, nowhere to run," he said.

Fred Murray said that police failed to look for her in any meaningful way until days later.

"Mr. Murray, it is the first time I met with (him), and as I said, I told Mr. Murray that I will look into it, and I will get back to him just as soon as I possibly can," New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch said.

"We will see if he is able to do anything. If he is, great. If he is not, then I am kind of back to where I was when I came up the front steps," Murray said. "At least I have more hope then I had before."

A service for Maura Murray will be held in her hometown of Hanson, Mass., Wednesday.
Title: Newspaper Articles #147
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:15:41 am
Hanson Express

February 9, 2005

Maura Murray: A year of waiting

By Justin Graeber

After a year, Maura Murray's family and friends are no closer to finding out what happened to her.

The Hanson resident and former Whitman-Hanson track standout hasn't been seen since running her car off the road last Feb. 9 in a remote New Hampshire town near the Vermont border. Since then, her friends and family have banded together in an effort to put her name in the media so that someone, somewhere, will come forward with some information.

For the first six months after her disappearance, Maura's father, Fred Murray, trekked up to New Hampshire every weekend to search for his daughter. He combed the woods near the crash site for any trace of her, and talked to locals endlessly – two things he believes the state and local police didn't do enough of in the immediate aftermath of the crash.

“The only person looking for my daughter is myself,” he said.

On Wednesday, Murray petitioned newly elected New Hampshire governor John Lynch to release the records on the case. He said he has had difficulty obtaining many documents that should be public records. He also wants the case to be classified as a criminal investigation, which he believes may result in a more diligent investigation by the state police.

“The brakes have been slammed on what they say is an investigation,” said Murray. “When I do talk to [the state police] it's like a broken record: ‘I have nothing to tell you.’”

As the details of Maura's disappearance surfaced, questions were indeed raised about the police's investigation. The initial report by local police said that “a witness” believed Maura was drunk, but when the crash's sole eyewitness, a local school bus driver, went public, he disputed that fact. The state police have also resisted attempts by the FBI, contacted by the family, to get involved in the case.

Just recently, members of Maura's family discovered that police did not look into Maura's phone records from the day she disappeared. Sharon Rausch, the mother of Maura's fiancé Bill Rausch, got a copy of Maura's last cell phone bill and found that the last call she made was to members of a condo association near where she was last seen. When Rausch contacted the people, she was shocked to find out they had never been questioned by police.

Why that was so significant is because it seems to poke a hole in the state police's theory that Maura went missing of her own accord. Maura was in New Hampshire after she left UMass Amherst, where she was a nursing student. She emailed her professors, saying there had been a death in the family, which turned out not to be true.

The police have maintained that she may have run away, and indeed it is historically much more difficult for police to make headway in a case involving a missing adult. The case has always been classified missing persons. But the phone call would appear to indicate that Maura intended to stay for a few days in New Hampshire, an area where she often vacationed with her family.

This has all led Fred Murray to one conclusion.

“They're not looking,” he said. “[locals] weren't involved until 10 or 11 days after the investigation…what kind of police work is that?”

Other than one minor incident about searches parking, Murray said that the local residents have been pleasant and helpful.

“They're very nice people,” he said. “They've been very sympathetic.”

At UMass, there was an initial outpouring of support after her disappearance, said Dan O'Brien, who writes for the college newspaper The Daily Collegian and has done a few stories on Maura.

“When it happened it was shocking,” he said. “It could have been your best friend…she looked like the all-American girl. It struck a chord in the UMASS community.”

No services are planned at the college for the one year date, O'Brien said. Maura, a transfer student who spent many weekends visiting her out-of-town boyfriend, didn't have time to make a lot of friends before she disappeared. That plus the rapid turnover of a college campus has created a short memory among the students, although there is a small group that follows the case and offers supportive comments on the Collegian's website.

At home in Hanson, a private service was held at St. Joseph the Worker's Church. Maura's mother and her friends from high school, a close knit group of girls who bonded through the track team, attended.

“They keep in touch every day,” said Beth Drewniak, the mother of Liz, one of the girls. “They're very very sad.”

The girls even came up with a slogan that helps them get through the hardest times without their friend - Trust and believe. “They want to believe that she's ok, that she's coming home,” Drewniak said. “It's difficult…we pray all the time.”

“It's a mass of hope,” said Fr. Mark Hannon, pastor of St. Joseph's. “We're trying to keep the hope alive.” He said Maura's friends are “very worried…they hope and pray that Maura is ok.”

After Fred Murray delivered the letter to Lynch, he and other members of her family gathered at the accident site on Route 112 near Haverhill, MA. The aging blue ribbon on the tree which Maura's car struck was replaced, and a local minister offered prayers.

The family has also been keeping Maura's story alive through her website, www.mauramurray.com, and other less-mainstream news venues. A profile on Maura has been set up on several missing persons websites such as crimenews2000.com. Recently, her picture appeared on a stock car at a NASCAR event.

Through it all, Fred Murray is hanging on to hope that his daughter is safe and sound somewhere.

“I want her alive,” he said. “But failing that I want whichever of the dirtbags that did this to be caught.” Although he is skeptical, he also hopes the State Police will be more forthcoming in the future.

“I don't want the state police to be a hindrance,” he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #148
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:18:10 am
The Caledonian-Record

February 10, 2005

Fred Murray Meets With N.H. Governor - Lynch Says He Will Help If He Can

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL, N.H. -- Fred Murray went to Concord, N.H., Wednesday morning to meet with Gov. John Lynch to get help in finding his daughter, Maura Murray.

He also asked the governor for help in obtaining the state police report on his daughter and any other investigative records to assist him in his own investigation.

Maura Murray was a 22-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst when she disappeared after a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., Feb. 9, 2004.

Murray said he was able to meet with Lynch for about five to 10 minutes Wednesday. He said he hopes the governor wasn't just listening to get him out of the office.

"He said he would look into it," Murray said. "He asked what he could do for me. I said, 1Get the information released so I can stop wasting my time and get some direction.' There's no sense police sitting on (information) if they aren't doing anything with it."

Murray said he also asked Lynch to have state police ask for help from the FBI to help with the investigation to find his daughter.

"If the state police can't do it, get people in who are willing," he said. "Get it listed as a criminal investigation to get manpower on it. Also, if it is listed as a criminal investigation, the FBI does not need to be asked by the state police to become involved."

State Police Lt. John Scarinza has maintained from the beginning Maura's disappearance is a missing-person case.

"I think the state police have done an excellent job with the investigation," New Hampshire Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeff Strelzin said Wednesday.

Strelzin said he believes the information Murray is seeking is "withholdable" under the Freedom of Information Act. And he does not believe his boss, Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, will call in the FBI.

"If the state police feel they need assistance, they will ask for it," said Strelzin. "Overall, I believe the state police have handled it appropriately."

In reference to the state police delay for nine months in contacting the owner of a condominium in Bartlett, to whom Maura had placed one of her last two cell phone calls, he said, "I am not going to comment on specific parts of the investigation."

Murray said Wednesday he will wait a reasonable amount of time to see if Lynch is able to get the records on his daughter's case released. If they are not released, he said he may go to court to try to obtain them.

"I'm not willing to quit," he said.

Murray filed a freedom of information request last year to get the records released and was denied by the state police.

Officials from the Haverhill Police Department, which initially handled the case, deferred comment on it Wednesday to the state police.

Scarinza hasn't return numerous calls to his office over the past few days.
Title: Newspaper Articles #149
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:19:07 am
The Caledonian-Record

February 10, 2005

Maura Murray Remembered A Year After Disappearance - Fears Center On Abduction

By Gary E. Lindsley

News photographers and reporters practically outnumbered family and friends of Maura Murray as they marked the one-year anniversary of her disappearance with a ceremony Wednesday.

Kathleen Murray, Maura's sister, wiped away tears and buried her head in the shoulder of her fiance, Tim Carpenter, as a small boom box played the song, "For Maura."

Others choked back tears or dabbed at them with tissues as traffic passed by on Route 112, the site where Maura Murray was involved in a minor one-car accident the night of Feb. 9, 2004.

She hasn't been seen or heard from since. Her credit card, cell phone and bank account have not been used in the year since she disappeared, according to her family.

Maura, a nursing student, left her dorm at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst around 4 p.m. Feb. 9 and is believed to have been heading to Bartlett, N.H., according to family members. She and her father, Fred Murray, had stayed there numerous times during their jaunts to the White Mountains.

As Maura's 1996 black Saturn rounded a sharp left curve just past The Weathered Barn on Route 112 at about 7:30 p.m., she lost control of the car and it went off the right side of the highway, striking a tree.

Butch Atwood, a First Student bus driver who lives just up the road from the accident scene, stopped his school bus by the Saturn to see if he could help. Murray was still in her car.

"I saw no blood," he said at the time. "She was cold and she was shivering. I told her I was going to call the police."

Maura, according to Atwood, told him not to because she had already called the AAA.

Atwood said he invited the woman to wait at his house nearby, but she declined. He said he then went home to call 911.

After about seven to nine minutes, he said he looked out and saw a Haverhill police cruiser by the Saturn. A short time later, Haverhill Police Department's Sgt. Cecil Smith notified Atwood that when he arrived at the crash scene, Murray was no longer with her car.

On Wednesday Maura's father placed a new picture and bow on the tree where Maura had her accident.

There also was a prayer given by the Rev. Lyn McIntosh. The song, "For Maura," was written and sung by Maura's friend Jenny Brooks.

"I have been up here more than I have cared to," Kathleen Murray said. "It's very hard. It's not getting any easier."

During the early stages after her sister's disappearance, she visited the area to help search for Maura.

"There is no question she was going to Bartlett," Fred Murray said after the observance Wednesday afternoon. "It is our favorite place. Bartlett is our home operation up here."

He said he and Maura used to visit the area four to five times a year and would hike area mountains in the region.

"We've been going there ever since I changed her diapers in the woods," Fred Murray said.

Although he is hopeful his daughter is still alive, he said he is also realistic. He said he has visited the area nearly every weekend since Maura's accident and disappearance to search every nook and cranny.

"I have gone into some spots (that were) really scary," he said. "Every time I feel a little lighter and younger when I come out of the woods and I don't find anything."

Although he doesn't believe it actually happened, Fred is hopeful someone picked Maura up after the accident and took her to a bus station across the Connecticut River to catch a bus.

"I wish we didn't have to do this," he said. "I hope it's the last time I have to do this."
Title: Newspaper Articles #150
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:19:43 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

February 10, 2005

Missing Girl Remembered by Family on Anniversary

By Lorna Coloquhoun

HAVERHILL -- A year after her perplexing disappearance following a car accident, the family and friends of Maura Murray gathered at the corner where she was last seen to remember her and to pray that they would one day know what happened to her.

"Right now, I'm taking care of business -- stuff I have to do," said her father, Fred, yesterday. "I'll think about it later."

It was a year ago last night that Maura Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, crashed her car on the corner of Route 112 in Swiftwater. In between the time neighbors called police and their subsequent arrival some 10 minutes later, the young woman vanished and has not been seen or heard from in the past year.

About a dozen family and friends gathered at that corner for a brief ceremony to remember her and to tend to the tree that has become a small shrine to her, tied with a blue ribbon and pictures of her.

Fred Murray cut away a faded blue ribbon and tattered photos of his daughter, replacing them with an enormous blue bow, its ribbons trailing to the ground, and new photos.

The Rev. Lyn O. McIntosh of Lisbon conducted a prayer circle.

"I am convinced there will be an answer," she said. "We are driven by hope and strengthened by everyone around us. I offer a prayer for Maura and for all of us."

Fred Murray, who has been critical of the investigation into his daughter's disappearance, recounted the accident and pondered how Maura could have started walking down the road. He mused about how police did not travel down the road to look for her that cold, dark night.

A search was mounted for her in the days that followed, and again last July. At that time, there was two feet of snow on the ground and searchers found no evidence that she went into the woods.

The investigation found that Murray had packed up her dorm room and headed north to the White Mountains, where she and her father had hiked over the years. She had also received a phone call at work in the days preceding her disappearance that was troubling enough to her that she had to be escorted back to her room. She e-mailed her professors to say that she would be leaving campus for about a week.

Prior to yesterday's ceremony, Fred Murray met with Gov. John Lynch for several minutes at the State House, urging him to use his influence to release records from the investigation.

"I asked, failing that, to have it declared a criminal investigation rather than a missing person investigation, and, if he didn't want to do that, I asked him to accept the offer of the FBI to come in," Murray said after the meeting with Lynch.

Lynch made no commitments on the specific requests.

"I told Mr. Murray that I will look into the situation, and I promised to get back to him as soon as I possibly can and that's how we left it," Lynch said.

State Police Lt. John Scarinza said yesterday that the investigation, which has already logged thousands of hours, continues.

"We are actively working on the case everyday," he said. "There is not a day that goes by when it's not on the forefront of our thoughts."

Murray is not impressed. He said he's heard nothing from the investigators in six months. "I am the investigation. That's why I want the information," he said.

Scarinza said his troopers talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear. Murray's claim he hadn't heard from them in six months is "absolutely inaccurate," he said.

Scarinza did add that investigators have not "been able to develop leads that would explain what happened."

A song written by a friend of Maura's was played during yesterday's remembrance. After the notes faded, Fred Murray leaned his head against the tree bearing his daughter's photo.

"I wish you were here," he said. "I didn't want to have to do this -- I sure hope this is the last time we do this."

As the ceremony was breaking up, the family of Lorne Boulet of Bristol pulled off the road. Boulet, 23, was last seen July 29, 2001, at his home in Chichester and has not been seen since.

"We wanted to share our emotion with the Murrays," said Louise Holmburg of Bristol. "Lorne's been gone for three and a half years."

On the Net: http://www.mauramurray.com/
Title: Newspaper Articles #151
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:20:34 am
Boston Herald

February 10, 2005

Page 20

Mass. dad asks N.H. gov for help finding daughter

By Marie Szaniszlo

The father of a University of Massachusetts at Amherst student who vanished a year ago on a New Hampshire road asked Gov. John Lynch yesterday to release records of the investigation and accept the FBI's offer to help find her.

"Right now, I am the investigation," Fred Murray said "That's why I want the information."

New Hampshire state police have declined the FBI's offer to help find Maura Murray, saying there is no evidence of foul play, even though the nursing student and former West Point cadet left behind her car and belongings after it skidded into a snowbank on Route 112 in Haverhill.

From his home nearby, a witness called police, who arrived within 10 minutes, but by then, she was gone.

"She didn't just vanish into thin air," her mother, Laurie Murray, said.

Lynch said he would consider the family's request and contact them "as soon as I possibly can."

Family and friends have started a Web site, www.mauramurray.com, and are offering a $40,000 reward.

Herald wire services contributed to this report.
Title: Newspaper Articles #152
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:21:02 am
Portsmouth Herald

February 10, 2005

Missing lady’s dad visits gov. - Fred Murray asks that investigation records be released

By Anne Saunders

Associated Press

CONCORD - The father of a Massachusetts woman who disappeared a year ago met with Gov. John Lynch on Wednesday to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation.

Fred Murray, whose daughter, Maura, vanished after a minor car accident in Haverhill, wants state police to release their records so he can pursue leads himself.

“I asked, failing that, to have it declared a criminal investigation rather than a missing person investigation, and, if he didn’t want to do that, I asked him to accept the offer of the FBI to come in,” Murray said after the meeting with Lynch.

Lynch made no commitments on the specific requests.

“I told Mr. Murray that I will look into the situation, and I promised to get back to him as soon as I possibly can, and that’s how we left it," he said.

Maura, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, was last seen on Feb. 9, 2004, walking away from her car on Route 112 in Haverhill. Police said they have no evidence of foul play and have searched the area repeatedly.

“Literally thousands and thousands of hours have been invested in the search for Maura Murray,” said state police Lt. John Scarinza, of Troop F, which is handling the investigation.

Murray was highly critical of state police and said he’s heard nothing from the investigators in six months.

“I am the investigation. That’s why I want the information," he said. Scarinza said his troopers talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear.

Murray’s claim he hadn't heard from them in six months is “absolutely inaccurate.” he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #153
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:21:56 am
The Patriot Ledger

February 10, 2005

Haunted, but hopeful: Family wants N.H. police to do more to find Maura Murray, who disappeared a year ago

By Joe McGee

HAVERHILL, N.H. - Fred Murray rips down a worn blue ribbon from a tree standing off the side of a country road. It has been a year since his daughter, Maura Murray of Hanson, disappeared from this site on Route 112 in Haverhill. Murray puts up a new ribbon as a symbol of new hope.

‘‘I hope this will be the last time we have to do this,'' he said.

Maura, then 22, left the University of Massachusetts at Amherst on Feb. 9, 2004, and was last seen that evening on Route 112 after the car she was driving crashed off the road.

She may have wanted to get away from personal problems of some nature when she left Amherst and so she is officially listed as a missing person. But her family believes she was abducted after the crash. Credit cards and a cell phone were inactive and it is unlike her not to contact her family during a time of need.

After a year of waiting and wondering in anguish, Fred Murray and his family are tired of hearing questions about why Maura left school. They want to know what happened when she reached Haverhill.

‘‘They say she was suicidal and a runaway but there is no sign of it. The wrong guy picked her up,'' Murray said.

Murray brought this message directly to Gov. John Lynch yesterday when he entered the State House's executive chamber and interrupted a meeting to personally ask the governor to release records of his daughter's case. Murray believes the New Hampshire State Police were lax in their investigation and now feels it is his duty to follow all possible leads.

Lynch made no commitments. ‘‘I told Mr. Murray that I will look into the situation, and I promised to get back to him as soon as I possibly can,'' he said.

Murray said the meeting was a positive start toward repairing relations between him and investigators handling the case.

New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarniza said that if Lynch's office calls he won't be able to offer any new information even though his detectives have spent ‘‘thousands'' of hours investigating the case.

‘‘Contrary to what Mr. Murray says, this case continues to be a high priority,'' he said.

Music and prayer

Murray's State House appearance was followed later in the afternoon with a prayer vigil at the crash site.

A group of family and friends followed Murray from Concord north to where Maura was last seen. The trip along Route 112 (the Kancamagus Highway) winds through the White Mountain National Forest and along the Wild Ammonoosuc River in some of the most deserted areas of the region.

‘‘It's hard to come here. This place reminds me of her because I've been up here so many times to look for her,'' said Maura's brother, Fred Murray of Hanson.

Clergy read a prayer and a special song written for Maura by Jenny Brooks, a high school classmate, was played by the roadside.

‘‘We're haunted by the unknown but driven by hope,'' the Rev. Lyn McIntosh of Lisbon, N.H., said to the group.

The Murrays spent the last year traveling this rugged country on the weekends to search and investigate on their own. While some locals sympathize with the family, others are upset by their walking on private property, questioning of neighbors and the media attention the case has brought to their rural community.

Butch Atwood was the last person reported to have seen Maura alive. He offered her a ride to his home up the road where his wife and mother were that night. Atwood says Maura refused his help but he called police anyway.

Maura was gone when a police officer arrived. There were no footprints or any other markers to show where she was headed.

Atwood said he is tired of having his name associated with the case. He said reporters have continually questioned him and taken undesirable photographs that may lead some to believe he was a suspect. Police, however, said they questioned Atwood as a matter of routine but never considered him a suspect.

‘‘I'm irritated beyond irritation,'' Atwood said. ‘‘I only tried to help her. It hurts.''

A former Taunton, Mass. police officer, Atwood and his wife moved to New Hampshire in 1984. Because of his police background, Atwood said he has always been kind to stranded motorists.

Neighbors disagree

The owner of a general store near Haverhill feels the same resentment toward Fred Murray.

‘‘He's just wrong. He's not telling us everything about her and what he's done is turned neighbor against neighbor up here,'' Bill Matteson said.

But among the disgruntled townspeople are people like Gina Paye who said she lives on Route 112 with three young children. A Springfield, Mass., native, Paye said she has reconsidered her move to the area since Maura's disappearance. Now she doesn't let the children out of her sight.

‘‘It has made me very nervous about living here and I don't know if it's safe anymore,'' Paye said.

‘‘I don't want to down our police department but I honestly don't know if they searched enough. I don't care about her background or if she was drinking. My feeling is she was picked up and we need to know what happened.''

Murray said he won't rest until that question is answered.

‘‘I'm encouraged,'' he said after meeting with Lynch. ‘‘But I'll be more encouraged when I see a better response (from police).''

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #154
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:22:38 am
Journal Opinion

February 25, 2005

Page 1

Rumor

Haverhill -- Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams confirmed Monday that a rumor circulated over the weekend is untrue -- no body has been found in Haverhill, and Maura Murray's whereabouts are still unknown, he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #155
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:23:11 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

March 3, 2005

Cars, cabin now focus of search

By Stephen Seitz

Goshen -- Two cars seized by police may contain clues to the disappearance of Edith "Pen" Meyer, who vanished from her home in Goshen last week.

One car was found in Claremont, and the other car was taken from a Lempster resident, police said. No further information was released about the vehicles.

Investigators also spent much of the day searching a cabin in that town.

Despite this, investigators say that the 55-year-old woman's disappearance is still considered "unusual."

"We won't consider this to be suspicious unless we have evidence of foul play," said Senior Assistant Attorney General Will Delker. "On Monday, we seized a car based on following up a tip, and the car will be searched."

The car does not belong to Meyer, Delker said; her vehicle is still in its place in her garage.

"The house looks like somebody just left," Delker said. "What it looks like is that she either walked out or somebody picked her up."

Meyer was last seen on the evening of Feb. 22 when some friends were visiting. She was supposed to meet someone the next morning. An avid snowshoer who rarely left the house without her dog, that friend was surprised to find both snowshoes and spaniel, but not Meyer. He alerted police, who have been searching ever since. An extensive search has eliminated the woods around her home on Gunnison Lake.

Many of the usual investigative avenues turned up dry. "She didn't have a cell phone," Delker said. "I don't know if she had a computer. We looked at her financial records and her credit cards, and there's no activity after her disappearance."

More personal details are emerging about Meyer's background. According to court documents, her brief second marriage ended last September in Sullivan Superior Court.

Meyer married Newbury resident Richard G. Rankin, now 65, in Goshen on Dec. 29, 2001. Meyer moved to New Hampshire in 1978, Rankin in 1994. The pair separated on May 18, 2004, and filed a joint petition for divorce on Aug. 12. The couple divided their possessions and finances, and the divorce was granted on Sept. 15. According to the decree, this was Rankin's second marriage and Meyer's third.

Attempts to contact Rankin were unsuccessful yesterday.

The couple had no children, though Meyer has three, two of whom, authorities said, live in New Hampshire. In divorce records in the space for her work number, the form reads "n/a" (not applicable). There were no court cases pending against either party when the divorce went through, or since. No domestic violence or restraining orders were on file at Newport district court.

Meyer was active in preservation causes, sold her weaving at area craft fairs, and served as membership director for the Norwich Farmers' Market in Vermont.

Despite this, according to Suzie Wallis, the market's president, no one there seemed to know her very well. Wallis said the matter of Meyer's disappearance was raised at the organization's board meeting Monday night.

"The members found the news sad and upsetting," said Wallis, "and they're sad that she's still missing. I've known her for a very long time, but only through the market, not socially. We knew that she had been married and divorced, and was divorced again. Otherwise, we have very little information."

New Hampshire authorities said the search is still being conducted in New Hampshire.

A number of women in New Hampshire have been missing or murdered in mysterious circumstances in recent years:

Maura Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, crashed her car on Route 112 in Swiftwater in February 2004, walked into the woods, and disappeared, leaving no trace.

Brianna Maitland, also a U-Mass student, vanished after leaving the restaurant where she worked in Montgomery, Vt. the following month.

Louise Chaput, of Sherbrooke, Quebec, was stabbed to death while hiking in Pinkham Notch in November 2001.

Tina and Bethany Sinclair, residents of West Chesterfield, left their home one night in February 2001, and haven't been heard of since. However, in that case, authorities have identified a probable suspect in the disappearance of the mother and daughter.

The publicity surrounding the current case has brought plenty of tips from the public.

"A lot of people have been very helpful," said Maj. Barry Hunter of the state police Major Crime Unit. "I only wish we could ask for something specific, but we'll take as much information as we can get."

Investigators are based at the Goshen Police Department, and police encourage anyone with information to drop in. A toll-free number, 1-800-852-3411, has been set up at state police headquarters for callers who have tips. The public also may call the state police Troop C barracks in Keene at 358-3333.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 156-Part1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:24:16 am
Steve Huff's Crime Blog

July 21, 2005

(1 of 3)

Maura, Brianna, and the Valley Killer?

(NOTE: My entries about the Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Groene murders/abduction and alleged killer, kidnapper and child rapist Joseph Edward Duncan III can be found here—The Groene Murders…)

If you click the thumbnail on the left it will take you to a map of the Vermont/New Hampshire border. The map you will see once you’re there is best viewed by pressing F11 on your keyboard to render it full-screen. Pressing F11 again, by the way, will render your screen back to normal, unless you like the full-screen effect in general.

On the map I’ve marked the approximate locations where victims of a still-unsolved series of murders committed by a killer local press dubbed the “Valley Killer” were found. In addition to the known victims of the Valley Killer I have also marked the approximate location in northern New Hampshire where, on a wintry February night in 2004, 21-year-old Maura Murray disappeared.

On the surface, there appears to be little reason to connect Maura Murray’s disappearance with a series of apparent abductions and murders that seemed to cease in 1988. In fact, there seems to be an attitude on the part of authorities responsible for investigating Maura’s disappearance that Maura might have even made a conscious decision to vanish that February night, over a year ago.

It is true that events leading up to Maura’s disappearance are puzzling. From a column in the Boston Globe by Brian McGrory published February 27, 2004, titled, Footprints in the Snow:

(...)Maura received a call on the evening of Feb. 5 that reduced her to tears. A couple of days later, she told professors she’d be gone for a week for a family emergency. On Feb. 9, she left her boyfriend of three years, an army lieutenant in Oklahoma, an e-mail and voice mail in which she indicated nothing wrong, packed her car, and headed north.

The next time she was seen was in this tiny valley town (Haverhill, New Hampshire), by Butch Atwood, a 58-year-old local school bus driver who passed her car as it sat in the snowbank. He said he stopped and asked if she needed help. She declined. He drove the 100 yards to his house and called the police. When they arrived, she was gone…

The weather that night was, as it can be in that part of New England in February, cold and nasty, the roads freezing. Maura had already had a wreck earlier that week, on February 8, at 3:30 a.m. She’d run her father’s new Toyota into a roadside post.

The morning of Monday, February 9th, 2004, the day Maura vanished, she is known to have done the following:

Some time after midnight on the ninth Maura performed a Mapquest search of the Berkshires and Burlington, Vermont.

At 3:40 p.m. that afternoon, Maura Murray withdrew $280 from an ATM and later made a stop at a local liquor store in Amherst, where she was attending the University of Massachusetts. Surveillance cameras recorded her movements at both locations and she appeared to be alone.

The next time anyone saw Maura Murray was on that icy road in Haverhill, New Hampshire. It was about 7 p.m. when Butch Atwood asked the young woman if she needed help.

In the 10 minutes between Atwood driving 100 yards to his home and the police arriving at the scene, Maura Murray vanished.

Maura had no known health issues, physically or mentally, and her grades were good. Her relationship with her boyfriend was solid. There were no tracks leading into the woods by the road where she had the mishap in Haverhill, tracking dogs found no scent, and aircraft with heat-seeking devices found nothing in the area.

Ten minutes to most of us doesn’t sound like much time at all. Yet in that brief span of time, Maura Murray vanished without a trace.

Why even assume that Maura’s disappearance has anything to do with a pattern of murders that seemed to stop about 16 years ago? Why assume that her disappearance was part of a pattern at all? People young and old do disappear, and they disappear at random, sadly. Natalee Holloway is the first middle class white American girl to disappear in the manner she did from the island of Aruba in recent memory, perhaps ever, and no one has disappeared since Natalee vanished. No one is murmuring warnings of serial murder down there.

Well, they shouldn’t. And perhaps if Maura was the only young woman to vanish in the winter of 2004 from that northern border area between New Hampshire and Vermont there would be no reason to suspect any pattern at work.

But on March 19, 2004, just under 100 miles due north along Interstate 91, Brianna Maitland vanished.

One month and ten days after the mystery of Maura Murray began, Brianna Maitland left her job at a restaurant in Montgomery, Vermont in her 1985 Oldsmobile 88. Her car was found abandoned later against the side of a barn one mile from Brianna’s workplace. Brianna left behind a couple of paychecks in the vehicle, as well as contact lenses and medication she apparently needed.

In this article published on May 6, 2004 in the St. Johnsbury, Vermont Caledonian-Record, a meeting between the parents of Maura Murray and Brianna Maitland was detailed. From the article, titled, Police Have New Lead In Maura Murray Case:

The Maitlands and Murray believe there may be a connection between what has happened to their daughters. And they want that connection explored.

However, state police from Vermont and New Hampshire have discounted any connection between the disappearances of Brianna and Maura…

Often law enforcement agencies dislike efforts to link crimes in this manner. The term used by some who study serial crime for this problem is linkage blindness. Serial killers depend on linkage blindness—it is the achilles heel of local law enforcement, and can permit a killer clever enough to understand the problem years of anonymous freedom. Jurisdictions don’t exchange information, have separate and proprietary databases they use to track criminals and types of crime. Some departments, quite simply, compete, and try to outdo one another in percentage of crimes solved, number of perpetrators arrested.

There are many problems with mentioning Maura Murray and Brianna Maitland and then thinking about any connection between these girls disappearing and a serial criminal prowling the interstate that marks the border between Vermont and New Hampshire. If we want to go ahead and wonder about a connection to the Valley Killer from the late ‘70s and ‘80s and these girls, we have the gap of 16 years between the Valley Killer’s last known murder and the winter of 2004. The initial tendency is to doubt such a gap, since we know serial criminals either tend to keep killing or die, most of the time. If anything, amateur cybersleuths like me are guilty of the opposite of linkage blindness, if we are honest with ourselves—amateur sleuthing can lead to a bit too much of a conspiratorial mindset. It can be too easy to fall prey to what we’ve learned from crime fiction, and forget that the movies, novels, and fact are often as different as night and day.

But is it a rule that serial criminals only cease their favorite pasttimes when they get too sick to move or die? Nope. They age like the rest of us, and sometimes they just slow down. My favorite example at the moment—if “favorite” is the right word—Dennis Rader, the BTK Strangler, just recently confessed to 10 murders. Until March of 2004 Wichita authorities were fairly certain BTK’s murders had ceased in 1977. Only after Rader started talking did we find that he simply became more patient, more careful. More deliberate. In 1985, his neighbor Marine Hedge. In 1986, a murder the squad actively hunting BTK actually declared shortly after its discovery to definitely not be his—Vicki Wegerle. And if Rader is to be believed, finally, in 1991, Dorothy “Dee” Davis.

Rader’s method of operation changed. Not much—but just enough. He ceased his communication with authorities and the press. He abducted two of his later victims, where he’d killed people inside their homes before. Small changes, in retrospect. His victims, too, seemed to age with the killer—Hedge and Davis both in their fifties while Rader was still in his forties.

The point is, Dennis Rader proved to us all that even when we think they’ve gone away, sometimes they haven’t. Robert Graysmith, in his comprehensive book about the Zodiac Killer, may have discovered more than 40 murders beyond those for which Zodiac took credit in his many letters to the San Francisco press and northern California authorities. Those authorities have never been able to back Mr. Graysmith up, and some of them seem to prefer strongly the idea that Zodiac either died or moved from his habitual killing zone—that if Zodiac kept killing it was so far removed that law enforcement couldn’t adequately connect the crimes and recognize the signature of a single criminal.

I am saying, I suppose, that it isn’t as crazy to think the Valley Killer went away as it might seem at first glance. The link in the killer’s moniker in the preceding sentence will take you to verbal_plainfield’s comprehensive geocities site about serial murder, and the breakdown of the Valley Killer’s known crimes there is pretty succinct. A quote from verbal_plainfield:
Title: Newspaper Articles # 156-Part2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:24:59 am
Steve Huff's Crime Blog

July 21, 2005

(2 of 3)

The unknown slayer’s first victim was likely Cathy Millican, 26, her body found on September 25, 1978, in a wetlands preserve near New London, New Hampshire. She had been stabbed to death. (...T)he Valley Killer struck again on May 30, 1984. Nurse’s aid Bernice Courtemanche, 17 when she disappeared, was not found until almost two years after her disappearance. A subsequent autopsy revealed evidence that she too had been stabbed to death.

Nurse Ellen Fried went missing on July 10, 1984, but her remains were not discovered until over a year later in rural New Hampshire. Her autopsy also showed signs that she had died by knife. Eva Morse was last seen hitchhiking in Charlestown, New Hampshire, after leaving her place of work on July 10, 1985. Her corpse was not located until logger found it on April 25, 1986, with obvious evidence of knife wounds. Next was Lynda Moore, stabbed to death in her home outside of Saxtons River, Vermont, on May 15, 1986. Courtemanche, Fried, and Morse had all disappeared from Claremont , New Hampshire.

Another nurse was murdered by the elusive killer in January of 1987. Barbera Agnew, 36, disappeared on her way home from a ski trip. Her car was soon found abandoned at a Vermont rest stop but her body was not discovered unti March 28. She too was the victim of a vicious stabbing with wounds in the neck and lower abdomen area, which investigators were learning was the Valley Killer’s signature…

Again, the map I linked at the beginning of this entry is no work of art—I didn’t even use photoshop—but it does give you a decent visual representation of the locations of the Valley Killer’s dump sites. In general he seemed to keep his trolling confined to the Claremont area, tending to keep close to the border between the states. It would appear that Interstates 91 and 89 could have been his main routes of travel. He killed no further east than Cathy Millican in 1978, as far south along I-91 as Lynda Moore in Saxtons River, Vermont, in 1986.

I did not add Brianna Maitland’s disappearance to the map, but I did place a marker for Maura’s disappearance. She vanished from an empty country road in the dark, just a few miles from I-91 and the Connecticut River, which run like strange twins of asphalt and water northward until they part ways near St. Johnsbury.

When I first read of this unsolved series of murders and then wondered if there could be any connection between the killer trolling the I-91/Connecticut River corridor nearly 20 years ago and the girls missing last year I naturally shot as many holes as I could in the idea at first. I’ve tried to touch on a number of reasons it might be a silly conclusion to reach.

But there is also the nagging fact that Maura Murray was a nursing student.

From the North American Missing Persons Network page about Maura:

A nursing student from Amherst, MA, Maura was last seen at approximately 7:00 pm in the vicinity of Route 112 in Haverhill, NH…

Read the quote from the geocities site again and note:

Nurse’s aid Bernice Courtemanche

Nurse Ellen Fried went missing on July 10, 1984…

Another nurse… Barbera Agnew, 36…

It is an odd coincidence. Of the missing or dead women in question, the probable victims of the Valley Killer from the late ‘70s and ‘80s and the two girls who vanished in 2004, 4 were either associated with the nursing profession—student, nurse’s aid—or actually a nurse. If we include Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray as possibly having run afoul of the Hollow Man traveling that Interstate route, we have have 9 potential victims of the Valley Killer—six women apparently abducted and murdered, one—Jane Boroski—attacked but survived, two vanished.

Note too that I wrote “interstate route.” You can see at the verbal_plainfield site that it is the fact that the murders which began with the death of Cathy Millican in 1978 occurred mostly in the Connecticut River Valley that eventually even gave the unknown killer his nickname. Michael Newton, who has entries in both his Encyclopedia of Serial Killers and The Encyclopedia of Unsolved Crimes about this case, begins his own entries in the books thusly:

The scenic Connecticut River Valley forms a natural border between the states of New Hampshire aqnd Vermont… ~ Michael Newton’s Encyclopedia of Serial Killers, page 228.
Title: Newspaper Articles # 156-Part3
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:25:41 am
Steve Huff's Crime Blog

July 21, 2005

(3 of 3)

What occurred to me as I looked at maps tonight, both online and off, and tried to incorporate the idea that perhaps Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray both might have met up with a legacy older than anyone living along the border between those small New England states may understand, was that Interstate 91 parallels the Connecticut River—until St. Johnsbury, where I-93 splits off from 91 and the Connecticut River appears to wend northeastward while I-91 continues a more northerly track. If you continue on I-91 you eventually merge on to U.S. Highway 5 heading west, toward Montgomery, Vermont. And of course in March of 2004, just a little over a month after Maura Murray disappeared, the mystery of what happened to Brianna Maitland began in that very town. A mystery that is, if considered apart from any theories about the Valley Killer, still disturbingly similar to the one surrounding Maura.

So, Dr. Lecter asked Clarice, what does he do, this man you seek?

Consider the one who got away from the Valley Killer, Jane Boroski. Here is her experience as recounted in Michael Newton’s Encyclopedia of Serial Killers—Borowski was at a country store on Route 9 south of Keene, New Hampshire on August 6, 1988, when:

An unknown man approached Boroski in the parking lot, dragging her out of her car, and pulled a knife when she fought back. At one point in their scuffle, when she asked why he had chosen her, the man replied, “You beat up my girlfriend.” Boroski denied it, and the man appeared confused. “Isn’t this a Massachusetts car?” he asked. Boroski pointed out New Hampshire license plates, and the stranger hesitated, began to turn away, then rushed at her with the knife again… ~ The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers by Michael Newton, pages 229-230.

Boroski was able to give the only description available of the killer—a thin-lipped man with pale eyes and hair. Most interesting to me as I put this entry together was the odd exchange Jane Boroski had with her killer—“Isn’t this a Massachusetts car?”

Of course, it could have been just part of a ruse, or evidence of a truly disordered killer acting out of motivations making sense only to the voices in his head. Keene is close to the Massachusetts border, about sixty miles or so up I-91 and 14 miles or so east of the interstate down Highway 9. Maura Murray would have driven by on I-91 that February 9th, coming from Amherst and UMass, where she was studying to be a nurse.

Consider, then:

Serial killers are frequently the most mobile of criminals. Many of them drive habitually—Ted Bundy [crimelibrary.com link], is just one example of a serial killer who self-reported as much.

With the typical wanderlust of the serial killer in mind, consider it then as possibly being much more significant that Interstate 91 runs along the border between New Hampshire and Vermont than that the original Valley Killer murders took place in the Connecticut River Valley. The original crimes tended to center around the Claremont, New Hampshire area, but again, the killer appears to never have strayed much further from one of those interstate routes than when he killed Cathy Millican.

What could the connection between many of these victims and the nursing profession possibly be? Could it be significant that Maura Murray studied nursing at UMass Amherst, just south of the New Hampshire/Massachusetts border? Did any of the other victims from more than 20 years ago study at UMass?

The killer seemed non-plussed after seeing that Jane Boroski’s car was not from Massachusetts, to the degree that he seemed ready to back off. His final attack on the woman seemed like a second thought, since she’d seen his face, perhaps. Why would it matter if her car was from Massachusetts? Was there some esoteric criteria in the murderer’s head that dictated he look for cars crossing the state borders—to confuse authorities, and take advantage of “linkage blindness?”

All the victims were, as best as I can tell—fine details of the Valley Killer murders are not easy to come by—white women under 40. Three worked in some capacity as a nurse, Maura Murray was studying to be a nurse.

As demonstrated by what we now know about BTK, Dennis Rader, serial killers can slow down the pace of their murders and change their method of operation at will. The previous Valley Killer victims were mostly found some time after their deaths, indicating active efforts to hide the bodies in many instances. Neither Brianna nor Maura have been found—if we factored in the idea of the Valley Killer, would he have simply refined his methods at this point to the degree that he found a foolproof place to dispose of victims’ remains? If he has had all this time to practice, that is a logical conclusion.

Assuming for the moment there might be a connection between Maura, Brianna, and the Valley Killer; if there really did appear to be a lull between 1988 and 2004, where did the killer go? An examination of unsolved murders elsewhere in the U.S. that match up with what we know of the Valley Killer’s murders might not be a bad idea.

What happened to Brianna Maitland? To Maura Murray? At the moment we simply don’t know. We don’t even know if the similarities between the ways these girls disappeared are simply bizarre coincidences, or not. A twenty-something student and girl in her late teens, both attractive, one studying to be a medical professional, the other working as a waitress. Both of them appear to have single-car accidents, and both disappear completely, leaving their cars and questions behind.

Seven women in the 1970s and ‘80s attacked, six brutally murdered. Some of them connected across the years to Maura Murray by pursuit of a medical profession. Snaking through all of these questions the twin rivers of asphalt and water marking the borders of states, Interstate 91 and the Connecticut River.

The closest I can come to an answer in the midst of all this speculation at the moment is the idea that the truth, if it is ever found, will have much more to do with the highway than the river.
Title: Newspaper Articles #157
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:26:18 am
WCAX

About December 2005

Father sues for records in case of missing woman

HAVERHILL, N.H. The father of a Massachusetts woman who disappeared nearly two years ago in northern New Hampshire is suing to try to get investigative files.

Fred Murray of Hanson (Massachusetts) argues several police departments, the attorney general and the governor have violated the state Right to Know Law and federal Freedom of Information Act by not releasing files he has requested in the disappearance of his daughter, Maura Murray.

A hearing has been scheduled for January 18th in Grafton County Superior Court.

Murray disappeared on February ninth, 2004, after a minor crash in Haverhill. Fred Murray believes his daughter was a victim of foul play. He says authorities are treating her disappearance as a missing person's case.

On the Web: http://www.mauramurray.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #158
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:26:54 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

December 7, 2005

Mother set to bring children's bodies home

By Associated Press

Manchester -- The mother of two children whose bodies were discovered in Ohio last week said yesterday she is looking forward to meeting the woman who found her son and daughter.

Teri Knight said she will head to Ohio sometime this week to bring home the remains of Philip, 11, and Sarah Gehring, 14, killed by their father on July 4, 2003. A private funeral will be held Sunday in Hillsborough.

Manuel Gehring, 44, Knight's ex-husband, told police he killed the children somewhere in southern New Hampshire, then drove west until he buried them off Interstate 80 in the Midwest. He later killed himself in prison while awaiting trial.

Teri Knight, 44, a nurse, hasn't spoken yet with Stephanie Dietrich, the grocery cashier who found the children while walking her dog. Knight has Dietrich's phone number, but said she prefers a face-to-face meeting.

"If I'm going to go out there, let's have our first conversation in person," Knight said. "I'm anxious to meet her and the dog," she told WMUR-TV.

Dietrich, 44, lives in Akron, Ohio, about 15 miles from the spot in Hudson, Ohio, where she found the bodies.

Knight's husband, Jim Knight, said moving past the loss of Philip and Sarah has been easier by moving forward with their 2-year-old twin girls.

"We just get through it," he said. "Our twins help us a lot. They keep us busy. They've just been a godsend."

The Knights said they want to help other families search for missing loved ones in return for the generosity of the strangers who helped look for Sarah and Philip.

"It's helped us a great deal," Jim Knight said. "Now, we hope we can help others find their missing kids."

They specifically mentioned the case of Maura Murray, who disappeared in February 2004 after a single-car crash in Haverhill. No trace of the 21-year-old college student has been found.
Title: Newspaper Articles #159
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:27:25 am
The Caledonian-Record

December 21, 2005

TV Program To Highlight Missing Woman's Case - New Efforts Mounted To Find Maura Murray

By Gary E. Lindsley

A network television program is going to highlight the case of a young Massachusetts woman who disappeared nearly two years ago in Haverhill, N.H., after she was involved in a minor car crash.

Maura Murray, a 22-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was last seen by a school bus driver after her black Saturn crashed on a sharp left hand curve on Route 112 near the Weathered Barn, Feb. 9, 2004. She disappeared before police arrived.

The television program "20/20," which airs on ABC, will highlight Murray's disappearance on its Jan. 6 show, according to Sharon Rausch, the mother of Billy Rausch, Murray's fiance.

Rausch said she and her son were flown to ABC headquarters in New York, Dec. 7 for two days. They were interviewed from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. She said Fred Murray, Maura's father, was interviewed in Wells River, Vt., and at the site of the crash.

Donna Hunter, an assistant producer for "20/20," told Rausch "20/20" staff have been following Murray's case for awhile, according to Rausch.

The TV show's interest in Murray's case has been welcomed by Rausch, her son and Murray's family.

"My greatest hope is she is living and we will find out," said Rausch.

ABC News could not be reached for comment Tuesday.

Rausch is encouraged that John Healy of Warner, N.H., and other retired law enforcement officers are going to investigate Murray's disappearance.

Healy, who retired as a lieutenant after 19 years with the New Hampshire State Police, said he has 10 volunteers from New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont who will be taking part in the investigation.

Those volunteers include retired police chiefs and detectives who now are licensed private detectives.

"We want to make sure these cases never die," said Healy.

Healy met Murray's relatives at a training session put on by the Molly Bish Foundation. Molly Bish was abducted on June 27, 2000, from Comins Pond in Warren, Mass., where she worked as a lifeguard. Molly was 16 years old. The search ended June 9, 2003, when Molly's body was found just five miles from the family's home.

The foundation helps with cases involving missing children.

"We don't have a game plan yet," Healy said. "First thing is to nail down the time [she disappeared]. Right now, we are just trying to separate fact from fiction."

Statistics, he said, will play a large part in the way they will conduct their investigation.

Healy said nationally, statistics show if someone is harmed, their body is usually left within five miles of where they disappeared.

He and his team will utilize topographical maps and compasses to conduct a search within five miles of the crash scene.

They will visit Haverhill in January and February and drive along the area's roads to learn where someone might feel safe while dropping off a body. That information will be entered into a GPS system. Then, during warmer weather, searches will be conducted using search dogs.

The team will also look at Murray's cell phone bill and the last 20 to 30 calls in an attempt to determine what was going on in Murray's life before her disappearance.

According to Healy, STALK Inc., a team of profiling professionals, has also offered its services to help find Murray.

"Our hearts won't let her go," Rausch said. "That is where my greatest hope is ... if she is alive, she is well. If she has run away, let us know she is well."
Title: Newspaper Articles #160
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:27:53 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Nashua Telegraph

December 25, 2005

20/20 to air story of missing student

HAVERHILL (AP) - The case of a college student who disappeared after a car crash in northern New Hampshire almost two years ago will be featured on ABC news magazine “20/20” next month.

Maura Murray, a 22-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, was last seen on Feb. 9,2004, walking away from her car on Route 112 in Haverhill.

Police said they have no evidence of foul play and have searched the area repeatedly.

Sharon Rausch, whose son is engaged to Murray, says she and her son were interviewed in New York earlier this month for a show to be aired Jan. 6. Murray’s father also was interviewed.
Title: Newspaper Articles #161
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:28:43 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

December 28, 2005

Father suing for records in 'missing' case

By Lorna Colquhoun

Haverhill -- The father of a woman who disappeared nearly two years ago after a minor car accident is suing several police agencies, as well as the governor, seeking the release of information tied to the investigation, according to court documents filed last week.

Fred Murray, father of Maura Murray, filed the papers last Wednesday in Grafton County Superior Court, charging that state police, Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, Gov. John Lynch, the state Fish and Game Department, Grafton County Attorney Ricardo St. Hillaire, the Grafton County Sheriff's Department and the Hanover Police Department, where the initial 911 call went after the report of the accident in February 2004, have violated the state's Right to Know Law and the federal Freedom of Information Act in not releasing investigative information he has requested in the years since his daughter's disappearance.

Not mentioned in the suit was the Haverhill Police Department, which initially investigated the accident before it was turned over to the state police.

Murray requested an expedited hearing on the lawsuits and it has been scheduled for 11 a.m. Jan. 18 at the Grafton County Superior Court. The documents were filed by the Chelmsford, Mass., law office of Gallant and Ervin.

The puzzling case of Maura Murray began on the night of Feb. 9, 2004, when the 21-year-old Massachusetts student crashed her vehicle on Route 112 in Swiftwater. Between the time a neighbor reported the accident and the arrival of the first officer on the scene a few minutes later, Murray vanished and has not been seen or heard from since then.

In the months that followed, according to the court papers, Fred Murray has requested the records pertaining to the investigation and was denied. Murray, in the court papers, contends that investigators have treated the case as a missing persons case.

Authorities have repeatedly maintained that they do not believe Maura was a victim of foul play," according to the court papers.

Yet, Murray maintains, his requests for the records were denied on the grounds that production called for confidential records created . . . or would constitute an invasion of privacy."

The documents contend that Murray has been assured" that the investigation into his daughter's disappearance is ongoing, but that he has not been made aware of any specific efforts the governmental authorities have taken in pursuing this matter within the past several months."

And, the court papers continue, If the investigation has concluded, (Murray) should be made aware of that fact" and the investigation turned over to him so he can continue to look for information in hopes of finding his daughter."

From the outset, Fred Murray has believed his daughter met with foul play.

The most compelling reason favoring disclosure in this case centers on the fact that Maura could very well still be in danger and disclosure of the information compiled by authorities could help locate her," according to the court papers. Although (investigators) have continued to dispute the notion, Fred Murray's familiarity with his daughter leads him to believe that it is likely that Maura Murray was the victim of foul play and may even still be in danger, rather than she went missing of her own accord."

Murray is requesting items such as accident reports, the inventory of items taken from her car, a copy of her computer hard drive left behind at her University of Massachusetts/Amherst dorm room, documents pertaining to searches, witness statements and the surveillance tape from a liquor store where she made a purchase.

On the first anniversary of his daughter's disappearance, Murray sent a letter to Lynch requesting his help in obtaining information.

The investigative body . . . has followed its astonishing careless go-through-the-motions response with an unnaturally steadfast refusal to communicate on the matter," Murray wrote.

A $40,000 reward is being offered for any information leading to Maura's safe return," according to a Web site being maintained for her at www.mauramurray.com.

The ABC news magazine 20/20 is preparing a segment on the case to be aired Jan. 6, according to the mother of Maura Murray's fiance. According to published reports, Sharon Rausch said she and her son were flown to New York earlier this month to be interviewed for the segment.
Title: Newspaper Articles #162
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:29:25 am
The Caledonian-Record

December 29, 2005

Father Sues State, Police Over Missing Daughter

By Gary E. Lindsley

New Hampshire state and law enforcement officials are facing a lawsuit filed against them by the father of a missing 21-year-old Massachusetts woman.

Maura Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was last seen after her car crashed on a sharp left curve near the Weathered Barn on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., Feb. 9, 2004. She disappeared before police arrived.

Murray left her Amherst dorm room the morning of Feb. 9 and headed north into New Hampshire. She was traveling along Route 112 in Haverhill when her car crashed.

A passing school bus driver saw and spoke with her. Between the time he spoke with her and left, and Haverhill Police arrived, a span of 10 minutes, she disappeared.

Her father has been seeking police records regarding the accident scene and her disappearance for nearly two years.

He has sought the information under the New Hampshire Right-To-Know Law as well as the federal Freedom of Information Act.

Murray has filed a lawsuit in Grafton Superior Court.

According to The Associated Press, Murray has been highly critical of police and met with Gov. John Lynch earlier this year to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation. He's now sued Lynch, Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, state police and other law-enforcement agencies seeking the release of information tied to the investigation, such as accident reports; an inventory of items taken from her car; a copy of his daughter's computer hard drive; and a surveillance tape from a liquor store where she made a purchase.

"I actually do hope to get the records," Murray said. "It is a missing person's case, not a criminal investigation, according to police. I need the records because I am still actually searching for her."

He is seeking injunctive relief stemming from an improper denial of records by an agency or official covered by the Right-To-Know Law, according to the lawsuit. He is not seeking anything but the information about his daughter's accident and disappearance.

Murray said he has been told by police and the state attorney general's office that information cannot be released because there is an ongoing investigation.

[Attorney General] Ayotte told The Associated Press Wednesday that she had not seen the lawsuit, which was filed last week, but that "we have shared whatever information we feel we can share without jeopardizing the investigation." She said that Maura Murray is still being treated as a missing person, but "it was a suspicious disappearance. We've treated the case very seriously."

"... The case continues to be pursued vigorously. Mr. Murray's had frequent contact with both my office and members of the state police. In fact, I personally met with him along with lead investigators of the state police last spring and he was assigned a victim's witness advocate from my office," who has been in contact with him regularly, Ayotte told The Associated Press.

Jeffery Strelzin, a New Hampshire senior assistant attorney general, would not comment about the lawsuit.

"I cannot comment on it because it is pending litigation," said Sheriff Doug Dutile, of the Grafton County Sheriff's Department, also named in the suit.

Murray's lawsuit seeks to determine whether the state agencies have violated the state information law.

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has determined that the Right-To-Know Law applies to all state executive branch agencies and departments, according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit maintains that public records, including investigative reports produced by law enforcement, must be produced unless they fall under on one of the statutory exemptions of the law.

The exemptions include: disclosure interferes with enforcement proceedings; deprives a person of a right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication; constitutes an unwarranted invasion of privacy; or discloses investigative techniques and procedures.

The lawsuit alleges that state officials have denied requests for information because the case is an ongoing investigation, or would constitute an invasion of privacy.

Murray claims because state police have from the beginning classified the case as being a missing person's investigation, not a criminal investigation, the information under New Hampshire law must be provided.

A hearing on Murray's request has been scheduled on Jan. 18 at Grafton County Superior Court.

"We need to narrow things down and go in a fruitful direction," Murray said. "Do I expect to get [the information]? I don't know. I hope they don't have any influence over the court."
Title: Newspaper Articles #163
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:29:56 am
Nashua Telegraph / Portsmouth Herald / Boston Globe

December 29, 2005

Note: Variations in the Portsmouth Herald are in Italics

Father sues state, police over probe

Man wants data released in daughter's disappearance

Father sues for records

Maura Murray disappeared in ’04 from Granite State

Father of Missing Woman Sues N.H. for Records of Case

HAVERHILL (AP) - From the moment his daughter disappeared Feb. 9, 2004, Fred Murray believed she was a victim of foul play.

Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, vanished that night after a minor car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill. Police searched the area repeatedly, but said they have no evidence of foul play.

Murray has been highly critical of police and met with Gov. John Lynch earlier this year to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation. Fred Murray, however, has been highly critical of police, and he met with Governor John Lynch earlier this year to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation.

He’s now sued Lynch, Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, state police and other law-enforcement agencies seeking the release of information tied to the investigation, such as accident reports; an inventory of items taken from her car; a copy of his daughter’s computer hard drive; and a surveillance tape from a liquor store where she made a purchase.

A hearing on Murray’s request has been scheduled on Jan. 18 at Grafton County Superior Court.

Ayotte said Wednesday she had not seen the lawsuit, which was filed last week, but that “we have shared whatever information we feel we can share without jeopardizing the investigation.”

A hearing on Murray's request has been scheduled for Jan. 18 at Grafton County Superior Court.

She said that Maura Murray's case is still that of a missing person, but that "it was a suspicious disappearance."

"We've treated the case very seriously," Ayotte said.

But Fred Murray contends he hasn't been made aware of "any specific efforts the governmental authorities have taken in pursuing this matter within the past several months." Murray also questions whether the investigation into his daughter’s disappearance is ongoing, saying he hasn’t been made aware of

"The most compelling reason favoring disclosure in this case centers on the fact that Maura could very well still be in danger, and disclosure of the information compiled by authorities could help locate her," the lawsuit says. according to the suit.

She said that Maura Murray is still being treated as a missing person, but “it was a suspicious disappearance. We’ve treated the case very seriously,” she said.

According to the lawsuit, Fred Murray was denied the records “on the grounds that production called for confidential records created . . . or would constitute an invasion of privacy.”

“Although (investigators) have continued to dispute the notion, Fred Murray’s familiarity with his daughter leads him to believe that it is likely that Maura Murray was the victim of foul play and may even still be in danger, rather than she went missing of her own accord.”

Ayotte said between state police, the Fish and Game Department, other law-enforcement agencies and her own office, thousands of hours have been spent on the investigation.

“The case continues to be pursued vigorously,” she said. “Mr. Murray’s had frequent contact with both my office and members of the state police. In fact, I personally met with him along with lead investigators of the state police last spring and he was assigned a victim’s witness advocate from my office,” who has been in contact with him regularly, she said. Police also have said that they talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear.

Maura Murray’s case will be featured on the ABC news magazine “20/20” next month. The case will be featured on the ABC newsmagazine "20/20" next month.

Police have said that they talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear.

A $40,000 reward is being offered for "any information leading to Maura's safe return," according to a Web site being maintained for her at http://www.mauramurray.com. A $40,000 reward is offered for information leading to the woman's safe return, according to www.mauramurray.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #164
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:30:25 am
The Boston Channel

(INCOMPLETE?)

January 4, 2006

Private Investigators Renew Search For Missing Woman 21-Year-Old Disappears After Car Accident In New Hampshire

BOSTON -- A group of private investigators agreed Wednesday to join the search for a missing Massachusetts woman who disappeared last year after a car accident in New Hampshire.

NewsCenter 5's Amalia Barreda reported that Maura Murray disappeared in February 2004 after walking away from an accident that she had in Haverhill, N.H. The mystery of what happened to the 21-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student still lingers.

"It's a real mystery. A young lady, seemingly with everything going for her, just vanishes off the face of the Earth," private investigator Thomas Shamshak said.

Shamshak said that Murray's family has reached out to the Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts, and the group decided to respond for free.

"They're in the throes of a crisis. I could not imagine something like that happening to me. When I look into these peoples' eyes they want some closure, they need some help. That's what we're offering. That's all we can offer is some hope and bring some peace to this crisis," he said.

Murray's father, Fred, has battled with New Hampshire authorities. He said officials have not done enough to find his daughter. The Murray family is suing the state for access to evidence gathered during the investigation.

Shamshak said that he does not expect that dispute to get in the way of his investigation. He said that his group, which is made up of retired law enforcement officials, hopes to bring a fresh set of eyes to the case.

"The investigative firepower that we're bringing to this is considerable. I mean, we're talking about a small department up there that had to rely on state police, and they could only go so far. It's a missing persons case," he said.

Shamshak said that 12 retired law enforcement professionals from throughout New England have already had a strategy meeting. He said that they would stay with the Murray case as long as it takes to solve it.
Title: Newspaper Articles #165
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:30:50 am
Boston Herald

January 4, 2006

Page 4

PIs working for free to find UMass Student

By Jessica Fargen

A team of a dozen private investigators is taking a fresh look at the case of missing college student Maura Murray after her family charged that New Hampshire authorities didn't do enough to find the woman they last saw two years ago.

"We still don't know where Maura is or what happened to Maura," said Helena Murray of Weymouth, whose husband is Murray's second cousin.

The family has exhausted searches of the wooded area where Murray disappeared. They hired a psychic profiler and are suing the state of New Hampshire for access to evidence such as videotapes and accident reports.

"We'll have more eyes, more hands, more ears and we quite frankly don't know a lot about what the police did," Helena Murray said.

Once known for promoting child ID kits and parental awareness, the Molly Bish Foundation has reached out in the past year to the Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts.

Together, they persuaded private detectives to work for free on three other cold cases involving murdered or kidnapped young women dating back to 1984.

Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, disappeared the night of Feb. 9, 2004, after she crashed her car into a tree in Haverhill, N.H.

"It's a real mystery," said Thomas Shamshak, who is part of the investigative team.

"Maura vanished. Could Maura be alive? Yeah, I think the family would hope that she went someplace else and may be living. But there's also the possibility she's not alive."

Helena Murray is hoping for some good news.

"We hope they can just look at things differently than we have," she said. "They can take all the information we do have - we don't have a whole lot - and see if they can come up with any answers."
Title: Newspaper Articles #166
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:31:14 am
The Republican

Thursday, January 5, 2006

Missing student search revived

By Holly Angelo

Northampton - A dozen private detectives from four states have teamed up with the Molly Bish Foundation in an attempt to help solve the case of Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts-Amherst nursing student who disappeared nearly two years ago in Haverhill, N.H.

About a year ago, the Molly Bish Foundation and the Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts Inc. partnered to offer free investigative services to families dealing with unsolved crimes. The Murray family, who live in various places in Massachusetts, is the latest to be helped.

"We'll be developing an investigative plan," Thomas P. Shamshak, an investigator with Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts and the public safety consultant for the Molly Bish Foundation, said yesterday. "We're going to reinterview everybody."

Shamshak said that means going back to the UMass-Amherst campus, where Murray, 21, of Hanson, was a junior nursing student. Before she disappeared on Feb. 9, 2004, she packed up her dorm room and e-mailed her professors to tell them she was going home for the week because of a death in the family, but there was no death in the family.

She disappeared on Route 112 in Haverhill after crashing her car into a tree. A witness told police Murray was unharmed after the accident, but when police arrived on the scene minutes later she was gone. Her car was undrivable.

"It really is a mystery. This young lady is seen, and in a matter of minutes she vanishes from the roadway," Shamshak said. "It's right up there with the Molly Bish case."

The foundation is named after Molly Bish, who disappeared from her lifeguard post in Warren in June 2000. Her remains were found in Palmer three years later, and her death remains unsolved.

The Murray family has been critical of the police investigation. Last week, Fred J. Murray, Maura's father, sued several state offices and law enforcement agencies in New Hampshire seeking the release of police reports and other information and items tied to his daughter's case. The family could not be reached for comment yesterday.

Lt. John K. Scarinza, commander of State Police Troop F in Twin Mountain, N.H., said several detectives continue to investigate Murray's disappearance daily. The investigation is technically titled a missing person case, but has been investigated like a criminal case.

"Certainly if anyone, whether it be a private citizen or anyone else, develops legitimate information that will help find Maura Murray, I welcome that," Scarinza said yesterday. "I think it's important people realize she left school voluntarily. She had a destination in mind. What we don't know was what that destination was."

Scarinza added, "It is also crystal clear the family's initial impression was she was in distress and was maybe considering suicide.

"May she be a victim of a crime? That's absolutely possible," he said.

Shamshak, who is the former police chief in Spencer, said he has spoken to Murray's friends, family, acquaintances and boyfriend. He said detectives from Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine will use all public records associated with the case. He said the New Hampshire state police have done a "considerable amount of work" on the case, but the volunteer detectives have the time to re-examine leads.

"When things go cold, that's where we step in," Shamshak said. "Anything that is generated from us will certainly be passed along to law enforcement."
Title: Newspaper Articles #167
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:31:48 am
The Patriot Ledger

January 5, 2006

New eyes look for missing woman: 12 volunteers could act as ‘catalyst’ in search for student from Hanson

By Joe McGee

A team of private investigators is joining forces with the family of Maura Murray to help find the missing 22-year-old Hanson woman.

John Healy, a retired New Hampshire State Police trooper, is leading the 12-man group of volunteers. They are already focusing on a few leads police might not have looked into, Healy said yesterday.

‘‘There are a couple of remote parking areas and fishing areas two to three miles from the highway and those areas may not have been searched yet,’’ Healy said.

Murray disappeared on Feb. 9, 2004, after her car was involved in a minor single-vehicle accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

Nearly two years later, the effort to find her has been re-energized, not only by the volunteer group but by national media attention and a recently filed legal petition.

The Murray case will be featured on the ABC-TV news program ‘‘20/20’’ next month. The segment will be titled ‘‘Vanished.’’

Murray’s family has been at odds with New Hampshire authorities. The family says police have not done enough to keep them informed about the investigation.

Murray’s father, Fred Murray, has filed a court petition seeking access to police records.

On the one-year anniversary of Murray’s disappearance, he hand-delivered a request for documents to New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch. It was rejected.

‘‘Essentially, he (Murray) has asked for the investigative file,’’ said Jeff Strelzin, New Hampshire’s senior assistant attorney general.

Strelzin said New Hampshire authorities consider the information confidential.

‘‘We’re going to oppose that request,’’ he said. ‘‘We’ll lay out our argument in court that essentially this is a confidential file and not something that should be released.’’

Healy said his team includes retired state troopers, two former police chiefs, a former federal agent and sportsmen familiar with the White Mountains region.

Healy was put touch with the Murray’s through the Molly Bish Foundation and the Licensed Private Investigators Association of Massachusetts, an industry group that has been working on the case of missing Brockton woman Jennifer Fay.

The association’s executive director said the New Hampshire team will add a new set of eyes to the search and act as liaison between the Murray’s and police.

"They can pave the road because they’ve worked both sides of a case ... so they can act as a catalyst," White said.

Healy said Strelzin was informed that the private search team is working the case with the goal of assisting authorities.

The Fay case will provide a blueprint for the investigation, he said.

‘‘We’ll have dogs as well as ground-penetrating radar available,’’ he said.

Healy said he has worked on several missing-person cases in remote parts of New Hampshire. He said there is a long history of people getting lost in the densely wooded White Mountains.

‘‘Sometimes it’s suicide and sometimes it’s homicide, but those are rare. Mostly it’s people getting lost, especially in February, when hypothermia can set in really quickly.’’

Sharon Rausch, the mother of Murray’s boyfriend, said the family is hoping for a resolution.

‘‘We all still feel that the odds are that Maura isn’t living, but it’s important for us to bring her home,’’ Rausch said. ‘‘We loved her, and if someone harmed her, they ought to be brought to justice.’’

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #168
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:32:14 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Seacoast Online

January 6/7, 2006

"20/20" report on missing N.H. women to air late Jan., early Feb.

'20/20' report on Murray is delayed

By Associated Press

A national television report on the case of a mysterious disappearance in northern New Hampshire won't air until late January or early February, the network said Friday. yesterday.

Reports last month indicated that a "20/20" report on Massachusetts nursing student Maura Murray would air last night. Friday But Alyssa Apple, spokeswoman for the ABC news magazine in New York, said the program is still being worked on.

Murray was 21 when she vanished after a minor car accident the night of Feb. 9, 2004, in Haverhill, N. H. Fred Murray, her father, believes she was the victim of foul play, but police say repeated searches turned up no evidence to support that.

Fred Murray is suing for access to records of the investigation.
Title: Newspaper Articles #169
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:32:42 am
Fox News - The Lineup

January 13, 2006

Maura Murray Mystery: We’ll tell you about the recently reopened missing person’s case of Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts-Amherst nursing student who disappeared nearly two years ago in New Hampshire. Her family has been critical of the police investigation and just last week, Fred J. Murray, Maura's father, sued several state offices and law enforcement agencies in New Hampshire seeking the release of police reports and other information and items tied to his daughter's case. Now, a dozen private detectives from four states have teamed up with the Molly Bish Foundation in an attempt to help solve this mystery.
Title: Newspaper Articles #170
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:33:07 am
North Country News

January 13, 2006

Private Investigators Work For Free To Find Maura Murray

In early January, members of The NHLI, and other investigators, began working on the Maura Murray case.

In Feb. 2004 college student Maura Murray disappeared while traveling through New Hampshire. Despite extensive efforts by the State and Local Police and Dept. of Fish and Game, she has not been found.

The Board of Directors of The New Hampshire League of Investigators, Inc. voted, unanimously, to take on the task of helping the family. NHLI is the only Professional Association of licensed investigators in the State.

The volunteers come from the NHLI and three surrounding states and are working with the support of the Molly Bish Foundation and other entities, such as S.T.A.L.K, Inc,.

Team members will follow the path set down by their colleagues in Mass. during their recent investigation into the disappearance of Jennifer Fay over 15 years ago. That investigation has led to several recent K-9 searches.

Some of the volunteers have met with members of the family to review the case and have reviewed all of the press coverage associated with the case. The volunteers then held a team meeting in New Hampshire, on Jan. 3, 2006, to further review the case and determine future action.

The team consists of several Investigators from New Hampshire, one from Vermont, two from Massachusetts and one from Maine. Some are retired from law enforcement, some are career private investigators and one is a retired Fire Chief from New Hampshire. All have offered their services pro bono.

The team has gathered all of the media coverage for study as well as topographical maps of the area and are in communication, regularly with the family. They also hope to serve as an interface between the family and law enforcement.

"There are many things that law enforcement does that they can not reveal, even to the family", said NHLI President John Healy, "We will try to help the family understand these things and the whole process, while letting them know this is still being actively investigated by the volunteers as well as law enforcement."

Members of the team will visit the area in early February to begin the familiarization process.

To learn more about the case visit: Mauramurray.com and to learn more about the Association visit: WWW.NHLI.Net.

It is well known that Maura Murray’s family has stated on several occasions that police have not done enough to find the missing woman. Murray was 21 when she disappeared on the evening of February 9, 2004.
Title: Newspaper Articles #171
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:33:41 am
North Adams Transcript / Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise

January 19, 2006

Note: The North Adams Transcript has additional information in italics.

Also there are some minor wording variations not noted here.

Father seeks records in case of missing girl

By Associated Press

Haverhill, N.H. — A judge Wednesday took under advisement a Massachusetts man’s request to see the police files in the case of his daughter who disappeared in northern New Hampshire.

Grafton County Superior Court Judge Timothy Vaughan heard the case in Haverhill a few miles from where Maura Murray, 21, disappeared after a minor car accident on Route 112 in February 2004, the Valley News reported.

Fred Murray of Hanson, Mass., believes his daughter was a victim of foul play and has is working with private detectives to investigate the case.

Murray claims police, the attorney general and the governor violated state and federal public information laws by not releasing the investigative files and that New Hampshire authorities have failed to conduct a criminal investigation.

The state disputed that claim and said a missing person investigation has the potential of being a criminal case and thus details that could compromise the investigation cannot be made public.

The state has maintained that it has shared any details that would not jeopardize the investigation into the disappearance of the woman, who was a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

After the hearing, Murray said he needs some of those records in his effort to recreate a timeline of what happened.

Murray said members of his family have received interesting information from people and relayed that information to police.

“We’d like to get these records, to see if any of this is being followed up on,” Murray said. “I’m moving every stone I can find, that I can budge. Maybe I can get a break, finally. I can use it.” he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #172
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:34:08 am
WPRI

January 19, 2006

Judge denies father's records request in case of missing daughter

Haverhill, N.H. A New Hampshire judge has denied a request from the father of a missing woman to review confidential police files in the case.

Maura Murray disappeared after a minor car accident in northern New Hampshire in February 2004.

Fred Murray of Hanson believes his daughter was a victim of foul play and sued to gain access to investigatory files. His suit claimed that police, the attorney general and the governor violated state and federal public information laws by not releasing the investigative files.

Judge Timothy Vaughn wrote in his decision yesterday that release of the records could compromise the case and lead to the destruction of evidence.

Maura Murray was a 21-year-old nursing student at U-Mass-Amherst when she went missing. Her father has hired private detectives to investigate the case.
Title: Newspaper Articles #173
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:34:34 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

January 19, 2006

Dad fights for documents in disappearance of daughter

By Lorna Coloquhoun

HAVERHILL -- The pile of documents relating to the disappearance of a Massachusetts woman nearly two years ago contains 2,500 pages, and her father wants to take a look at them.

Fred Murray, whose daughter, Maura, vanished from a rural road in Swiftwater in February 2004, was in Grafton County Superior Court yesterday morning, asking a judge to release those documents, a move he believes will help him in his own search.

"We want to take a fresh look and start over," Murray said after a brief court hearing on his request for release of information pertaining to the case. "This gives me my best hope and my only hope. There might be something in there that means something to me that might be the key."

Murray, through his attorney Timothy Ervin, filed last month for an expedited hearing on a motion for injunctive relief regarding information investigators have gathered in the time since Maura Murray vanished without a trace after a car accident on Route 112.

Judge Timothy Vaughn did not issue a decision yesterday.

Citing Supreme Court cases, Ervin said the fact that the case has always been categorized as a missing person, rather than a criminal matter, is significant.

"The state has never characterized this as an ongoing criminal case," Ervin said, and investigators have never given any reason as to why documents cannot be released. "The overriding concern is that she has been missing for two years and there is still no information about what happened."

Assistant Attorney General Daniel Mullen, who was accompanied by Jeff Strelzin, the head of the state's homicide bureau, said the investigation is ongoing and that it "could have criminal overtones."

Disclosure of information, he said, could "interfere with the ongoing investigation" and release of investigative material would make it "impossible to proceed."

Strelzin said after the hearing that divulging information from an investigative file could alert potential suspects about what is going on, which could cause them to flee or hide evidence.

A team of private investigators is taking up the case of the disappearance, and Fred Murray said there is basic information he needs, such as dispatch logs, that would help create a timeline of what happened between the time his daughter was involved in a minor car accident and the time the first police officer arrived at the scene.

"I'm standing here trying to move every stone I can budge," Murray said before leaving the courthouse yesterday. "Maybe I can get a break. I could sure use it."
Title: Newspaper Articles #174
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:35:01 am
Foster’s Daily

Friday, January 27, 2006

N.H. judge denies father's records request in case of missing daughter

By Associated Press

Haverhill, N.H.— A New Hampshire judge denied a Massachusetts man's request to see police files in the case of his daughter who disappeared nearly two years ago.
Title: Newspaper Articles #175
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:35:36 am
CNN

Transcript from Nancy Grace Show

January 27, 2006

"Good evening, everybody. I'm Nancy Grace. I want to thank you for being with us tonight. Tonight, the mystery surrounding a 21-year-old nursing student intensifies. Maura Murray drove into a tree, stepped out of the car unharmed. Police there on the scene in just minutes. Maura Murray is gone, never seen again.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Fred Murray wants to look at 2,500 documents, documents containing e-mails Maura sent the day of her disappearance, to information on what police found in her car the night of her accident two years ago, details Murray believes could solve this mystery.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Tell me what did you, tell me what you didn't do, and I`ll try to go back and see what you didn't do and take a fresh look at it and start it all over. It gives us -- it gives me my best hope. It gives me my only hope.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Murray's attorney claims the family has a right to the files under the state right-to-know law.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Her family knows her better than any other party. A second set of eyes looking at information that is clearly nonexempt may ultimately lead to locating her.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: After two years of hoping and praying, a father goes on the offense in the legal system. Two years ago, a beautiful young nursing student went missing after a minor car crash. She ran into a tree. Well, police got there just minutes after the crash and she is gone, never seen since.

Straight out to Gary Lindsley. He is a reporter with "The Caledonian Record."

Gary, are you with me? I know we've got problems with your IFB. Can you hear me?

GARY LINDSLEY, REPORTER, "CALEDONIAN RECORD": Yes, I can, Nancy.

GRACE: Great. Give me the facts, Gary.

LINDSLEY: Well, as it turns out, February 9th, somewhere around 7:00 or 7:30 p.m., Maura was headed on Route 112 in Haverhill, New Hampshire, and she had the minor car accident.

A bus driver came upon the scene, talked to her, asked her if she needed help. She said, no, she'd already called AAA. He went back to the house and called police.

Between the time he went back to the house and called police, a matter of seven to nine minutes, she was gone. No one's ever seen her since.

GRACE: Was there a record of her calling AAA?

LINDSLEY: No, there wasn't. She had not made a call.

GRACE: So she didn't call AAA?

LINDSLEY: Right. That was a very -- it's a very, very rural area. And cell coverage is very hard in some of those areas.

GRACE: Very rural area...

(CROSSTALK)

GRACE: ... so you said "isolated route." How many people? I mean, this is not a very busy road. How many people would have been going along that road to snatch her?

LINDSLEY: Not too many, because once you get up past the crash scene, there are seasonal residences between the crash scene and Woodstock, New Hampshire.

GRACE: To Diane Dimond, investigative reporter, what else can you tell us to supplement Gary's report?

DIMOND: Well, it was two years ago, right before Valentine's Day actually -- and this young woman, who was a nursing student, she'd also been a cadet at West Point, a girl with her head on straight, you would think -- e-mailed her professors and said, "I'm going to be gone for a week because there`s been a death in the family."

Well, there had been no death in her family. She left the University at Amherst in Massachusetts. And instead of going home, she headed north up to Vermont and New Hampshire. And that`s where this accident occurred.

It struck me, Nancy, and everything that I've researched about this case, she has this accident. Within 10 minutes, the police are there. She's gone. And there's snow all around her car, but there`s no footsteps. It's like a "Twilight Zone" alien abduction thing. I mean, where did she go?

She had diamond jewelry in the car that her boyfriend had given her, a bottle of liquor, some clothes, a book, you know, just the normal things, like she was just going to go home. But she went the opposite way.

To me, it's just heart-wrenching to see that father asking for these documents from the court. I want to look at the police report, he said, so my private detectives can take over. And they won`t let him do it. A judge has now said, no, we will not turn those documents over to you. It could compromise the investigation.

GRACE: To Barbara McDougal and Patti Davidson -- they are joining us tonight. They are cousins of Maura Murray. Ladies, thank you for being with us.

Barbara, what did -- yes, thanks, Liz -- Barbara, what did you guys hope to gain from these documents you were in court fighting for?

BARBARA MCDOUGAL, MAURA MURRAY`S COUSIN: Well, we were hoping that there might be information in them that the police would overlook as meaning nothing but the family it may mean something to us, to have a different avenue to go down in searching for Maura.

GRACE: Right. Yes, it's been two long years.

To Patti, Patti, what do you believe law enforcement has missed in this investigation? Obviously something.

PATTI DAVIDSON, MAURA MURRAY`S COUSIN: I believe they waited too long to get a search team together. They waited 39 hours, and it should have been done immediately after they went to the scene and found her not there.

GRACE: Now, I know that you have joined together with the Molly Bish Foundation. We had Molly's parents on for a full hour around Christmas. Their daughter taken and killed.

Joining us now, Tom Shamshack, P.I. on the Murray search. He's also working with the Molly Bish Foundation. What`s your take on this, Tom?

TOM SHAMSHACK, PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR IN MAURA'S CASE: Good evening, Nancy. John and Maggie send their love.

GRACE: Thank you. Thank you.

SHAMSHACK: All right. The investigative team, consisting of a dozen retired law enforcement investigators, is doing three things. We're looking to do investigative research on what has been written in the public domain. We're conducting interviews of percipient witnesses. And we're conducting a scene investigation, looking at the crash dynamics, and then again looking in the area, what possibly could have happened here.

GRACE: Renee, what else do you know about it?

ROCKWELL: To me, Nancy?

GRACE: Yes.

ROCKWELL: From what I can say, Nancy, is here is another situation where a family has had to hire a private detective. Why? Resources. In 2004, there were over 46,000 people missing in the U.S., 99 in New Hampshire. It's just a situation where I don`t know why the police department would have hid that or prevented them from getting those documents.

GRACE: Well, let`s look at the facts. No footsteps in the snow to indicate where she had gone. The police got there 10 minutes later, no sign of her. She had said there was a death in the family, told her professor she was leaving, no death in the family, and she went a different way. This was a minor crash; she went right into a tree.

Tonight, 603-271-2663, help us find Maura Murray. The reward up to $40,000 tonight."
Title: Newspaper Articles #176
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:36:05 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

January 27, 2006

Dad denied access to records on daughter

By Lorna Coloquhoun

Haverhill -- A superior court judge has denied a request by the father of a missing Massachusetts woman seeking the disclosure of records pertaining to the investigation into her disappearance.

Grafton County Judge Timothy Vaughn issued a five-page decision yesterday, a little more than a week after Frederick Murray sought an injunction for the release of papers relating to the disappearance nearly two years ago of his daughter, Maura.

Murray's attorney, Timothy Ervin of Chelmsford, Mass., said yesterday he would not comment on the decision until he conferred with his client.

Maura Murray, 21, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst, disappeared after a minor car accident Feb. 9, 2004, on rural Route 112 in Swiftwater. By the time police arrived at the scene, the woman was gone and has not been seen or heard from since that night.

In the nearly two years since his daughter went missing, Frederick Murray has sought, and been denied, various logs, accident reports and other information from a number of state agencies, including State Police and the Attorney General's Office.

Last month, he filed for an expedited hearing on his request for an injunction that would order the agencies to disclose the information and that hearing was held Jan. 18. Ervin argued that the information is not exempt from New Hampshire's right-to-know law. The state argued that releasing the information would impede the ongoing investigation.

Vaughn sided with the state.

"(The state) maintain(s) that release of the records could result in the destruction of evidence, chilling and intimidation of witnesses and the revelation of the scope and nature of the investigation," Vaughn wrote.

Murray has been critical of how the investigation into his daughter's disappearance has been conducted. He contends that the information gathered over the past two years could help his own efforts in finding his daughter. A group of private investigators is looking into the case.

"Considering that it sometimes takes several years -- even decades -- for the state to prosecute major crimes, a lapse of two years is not a long period of time," Vaughn wrote. "Release of the records could jeopardize the investigation and lead to, among other things, destruction of evidence, intimidation of witnesses and loss of communications with entities providing confidential information."

Preserving the integrity of the continuing investigation, Vaughn concluded, outweighs Murray's interest in obtaining records.
Title: Newspaper Articles #177
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:36:37 am
Boston Globe

January 28, 2006

Father's request to see police files denied

Haverhill, N.H. -- A judge denied a Massachusetts man's request to see police files in the case of his daughter's disappearance nearly two years ago. Maura Murray went missing after a minor car accident in Haverhill in February 2004.

Fred Murray of Hanson, Mass., believes his daughter was a victim of foul play and that police have not paid enough attention to the case.

He sued to get access to files from the investigation, but a judge rejected the request on Thursday. The state resisted on grounds that a missing person investigation has the potential to become a criminal case. State lawyers said that disclosing details could compromise a future investigation. Grafton County Superior Court Judge Timothy Vaughn agreed.
Title: Newspaper Articles #178
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:37:04 am
Boston Globe

January 29, 2006

Father seeks data on a lost daughter - After two years, an appeal is filed

By Russell Nichols

The father of Maura Murray, the Massachusetts woman who vanished on a rural New Hampshire roadside almost two years ago, will file an appeal with the New Hampshire Supreme Court in an effort to get case records that could help him find his daughter, his lawyer said.

Last week, a Superior Court judge denied Frederick Murray access to the records, saying releasing them may impede the probe.

But the lawyer, Timothy Ervin of Chelmsford, argued that the information falls under the state's right-to-know law and should be disclosed.

''They can't just, with a broad stroke, say everything's exempt," Ervin said. ''This is a missing-person's case. It's not a criminal investigation."

Murray had sued a number of agencies, including the attorney general's office and the State Police, after he was denied accident reports, an inventory of items taken from her car, and a copy of his daughter's computer hard drive, among other records.

Grafton County Judge Timothy J. Vaughan wrote that ''review of the records is not warranted because the evidence proffered confirms that Maura's case is an on-going criminal investigation and because disclosure of the records could interfere with law enforcement proceedings."

But Murray knows his daughter better than anyone, Ervin said, and somewhere in the stacks of 2,500 pages of records may be a phone number, an e-mail address, or a name that gives him a clue.

''We want to add to what the police have done and see if we find something new," Ervin said.

Right now, he said, Murray doesn't even have a complete timeline of events for Feb. 9, 2004, the day Maura Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst, disappeared after a minor car accident on Route 112. With the appeal, he said, Murray hopes that the court will release at least some of the documents so Murray and the private investigators he hired can try to figure something out.

Maura Murray's boyfriend does not understand the decision either. ''I really don't see why such a request would not be granted," said Army Captain Bill Rausch, 25, now stationed in Lawton, Okla. ''If nothing else, we're just asking to be put on the same playing field."

The day Murray disappeared, officials and family members had said she lied to a professor and the campus art gallery where she worked, informing them through e-mails that she needed to return to her hometown of Hanson because of a death in the family.

Driving on the rural highway, she crashed into a snowbank. A witness offered to help Murray, but she declined, and the witness alerted the police. When police arrived, she was gone. She has not been seen or heard from since.

Murray, a former top student and track standout at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, was described by friends and family as a responsible young woman who was very close to her family, particularly her father. She spent three semesters studying chemical engineering at the US Military Academy at West Point before transferring to UMass.

Family and friends have a website with news about the inquiry, and with data to remember her, at www.mauramurray.com.

Russell Nichols can be reached at rnichols@globe.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #179
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:37:30 am
Massachusetts Daily Collegian

January 31, 2006

New developments in search for missing UMass student

Almost two years after her disappearance, University of Massachusetts Amherst students can still see flyers posted around town, the word “Missing” printed above Maura Murray’s now-familiar face.

Her story remains at a grisly stand-still as her family voices disappointment with New Hampshire authorities.

The 21-year-old nursing student disappeared on Feb. 9, 2004 after leaving her dorm room in Kennedy Hall at UMass and heading through New Hampshire. Maura’s parents suspected foul play from the beginning, yet many investigators still say Maura ran away, or took her own life.

Prior to her disappearance, Maura withdrew $280 from an ATM and e-mailed her professors to tell them she was going home for the week because of a death in the family, although there had been no death.

Around 7 p.m. that evening, she crashed her car into a snow bank on Route 112 in New Hampshire, several miles from the Vermont border. Police say a witness offered help, but Maura refused and told the witness not to call police. The witness also told officials that she seemed to be intoxicated, but uninjured. When emergency workers arrived, Maura had vanished, and most of her belongings were left behind in the car.

Police said they see no evidence of foul play after searching the scene of Maura’s minor car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H. However Maura’s parents feel that investigators should take a fresh look in efforts to recover their daughter. The Murray family feels police do not take seriously the possibility that Maura may have been abducted.

Maura’s father, Fred Murray, met with Gov. John Lynch last year to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation. Since then, Murray has sued Lynch, state police and other law enforcement agencies in the hope of obtaining information from the investigation, such as accident reports, an inventory of items taken from her car, a copy of her computer hard drive, and a surveillance tape from a liquor store where she made a purchase.

The lawsuit claims that Murray was denied this information because the records are confidential, and their release would constitute an invasion of privacy. On Thursday, a New Hampshire judge ruled against Murray in the lawsuit.

“Release of the records could jeopardize the investigation and lead to, among other things, destruction of evidence, intimidation of witnesses and loss of communications with entities providing confidential information,” wrote Grafton Superior Judge Timothy Vaughn in his ruling.

Police have said that they talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear. However, Murray says that he hasn’t gotten any feedback from the governmental investigators in several months. This leads the family to wonder if the investigation into Maura’s disappearance is ongoing.

The idea that Maura could still be in danger is the most compelling reason for disclosing the information because it could aid in locating her, according to the suit.

Though investigators might write off this notion because it is based on a “gut feeling,” Murray insists that he knew his daughter too well to believe that she would go missing on her own accord. He believes it more likely that she was the victim of foul play.

Skepticism of the New Hampshire authorities’ fortitude in finding their daughter has led the family to take the investigation under their wings as best they can. Along with continually searching the wooded area where Murray disappeared, Fred Murray has gone in search of clues in the area’s local bars, hoping to overhear any information that could lead him in the right direction.

Additionally, licensed private detectives took on the case, thanks to the Molly Bish Foundation, which has partnered with the Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts. Since last year, the program has offered free investigative services to the unsolved cases of missing women, some of which date back to 1984.

The new private investigations intend to re-examine the angles of Maura’s case, and re-interview everyone involved.

There is also new publicity being focused on Maura’s disappearance, which might lead to a greater public outreach and efforts to help her safe recovery. ABC newsmagazine “20/20” will feature Maura’s case next month.

A Web site being maintained for Maura at www.mauramurray.com says that a $40,000 reward is being offered for any information that might help Maura’s safe return.

Maura had transferred to UMass from the U.S. Military Academy after spending three semesters at West Point. She was on the roster of the UMass women’s track and field team and worked in a local art gallery. Friends and family described her as a quiet woman who didn’t mingle much with classmates.
Title: Newspaper Articles #180
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:38:01 am
The Patriot Ledger

February 8, 2006

Ledger Update: Where is Maura? 2 Years Later, Missing Hanson Woman’s Family Clings to Hope, Waits for Answers

By Joe McGee

Laurie Murray has had the same bedtime ritual every night for the past two years. She prays to the Catholic patron saint of lost things, hoping that she’ll awaken to good news. ‘‘What I do every night is pray to St. Anthony,’’ Murray said. ‘‘I have a statue right here.’’

It will be two years tomorrow since Laurie’s daughter, Hanson native Maura Murray, a student at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, disappeared after a minor traffic accident in Haverhill, N.H.

Police, who have treated her disappearance as a missing persons case, stopped talking about leads long ago.

Even now, as the family clings to hope and waits for answers, they stand firm in their belief that wherever Maura went, she did not go willingly.

They are hoping renewed media attention and the work of a private investigator will yield results.

‘‘Someone doesn’t just disappear. ...She called me every night,’’ Laurie Murray said. ‘‘Something went horribly wrong.’’

A Web site, mauramurray.com, keeps her memory alive. It also has provided the family with tips and theories about the case, none of which has been confirmed by police. One tipster suggested that drug dealers in the rural area knew something about her disappearance.

Maura’s story has been mentioned on CNN, Fox News and ABC in reports about the mysterious disappearances of Alabama teen Natalee Holloway during a post-graduation trip to Aruba and honeymooner George Smith during a Royal Caribbean cruise. Maura’s story will be told again in a segment of ‘‘20/20’’ that the news program is calling ‘‘Vanished.’’

‘‘At this stage of the game, we have to put her in God’s hands and pray he’ll guide us to wherever it is to find her,’’ said Barbara McDougall of Weymouth, a cousin to Maura.

Tomorrow, while Laurie Murray is at church saying more prayers to St. Anthony, a private investigator will be retracing Maura’s steps from the time she left UMass on Feb. 9, 2004, to the time of the accident in New Hampshire that night.

‘‘You just go back and put yourself at the scene and imagine what could have happened that night,’’ said Tom Shamshack, a former Winthrop police chief and an investigative consultant to the Molly Bish Foundation who became involved with the Murray case in December.

Shamshack, -who says missing property often gets more attention than a missing person, - wants to interview those who were last in contact with Murray, including college friends, relatives and Butch Atwood, a bus driver who was the last to see her.

Atwood, who has since moved to Florida, was driving by in a bus that night and offered Murray help. He said she refused his help, saying she would call for roadside assistance with her cell phone even though there is no coverage in the area.

Atwood told New Hampshire newspapers that he went back to his home, about 100 yards from the accident scene, and called 911. Police arrived minutes later, but Murray had vanished.

Atwood said he saw other cars go by while he was calling for help, but that it was too dark to tell their makes or models.

Police found no footprints or other evidence to suggest Murray had walked away.

‘‘You just think about the different scenarios, number one being that she could’ve easily walked down the road to try to get cell phone coverage,’’ Shamshack said. ‘‘Somebody else could’ve driven by who nobody saw, and offered help. She got into that automobile and then left the scene and that’s it.’’

A New Hampshire Superior Court judge recently denied the family access to official police records, making it almost impossible to draw a timeline from when Murray left school to when she arrived in Haverhill.

But Shamshack said visiting Haverhill, a mountainside community of 4,400, would help him get a sense of where Maura could have gone.

The area of the accident scene, on Route 112 at a hairpin turn marked with a big red barn, should be the best source of what happened, he said.

‘‘I’m a Somerville guy and I have some understanding of what goes on on the streets, and my sense is what happened is right there in that neighborhood,’’ he said.

Murray’s boyfriend, Army Capt. William Rausch, said he still has a special place in his heart for Maura, the girl he planned to marry.

Still single, Rausch, 25, said he finds strength by dedicating himself to his job at Fort Sill, Okla., and staying close with friends from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where he and Murray met. Some of his colleagues knew Murray from the year she spent at West Point and have fond memories of her, Rausch said.

‘‘It seems evident that whatever happened is concrete,’’ Rausch said, ‘‘but I still love her like many others do, and I feel lucky to have had what we had.’’

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #181
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:38:43 am
Eyewitness News

February 9, 2006

Mass. woman disappeared in N.H. two years ago today

CONCORD, N.H. It's been a painful two years for the family of a Massachusetts woman who disappeared after a minor car accident in northern New Hampshire.

U-Mass student Maura Murray of Hanson, Massachusetts, was last seen on February ninth, 2004, walking away from her car on Route 112 in Haverhill, New Hampshire. Police have said they don't believe foul play was involved, and have searched the area several times.

Murray's family believes someone picked her up on the road. They have searched the area many times and so far have been unsuccessful in court to get information police have collected in the disappearance.
Title: Newspaper Articles #182
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:39:07 am
TheWMURChannel.com

March 17, 2006

'20/20' Examines Maura Murray Disappearance - Report Compares Case With Missing Oregon Woman

MANCHESTER, N.H. -- The unsolved disappearance of college student Maura Murray is well-known in New Hampshire, and now, the story is hitting the national airwaves.

Friday night, "20/20" will attempt to get to the bottom of the mystery. Murray vanished in 2004 after her car broke down, and anchor Elizabeth Vargas will take viewers through the events right before her disappearance.
Title: Newspaper Articles #183
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:39:33 am
Worldnet Daily

March 18, 2006

Serial killer behind 'disappearing' women? - Frustrated parents of 2 girls suspect cases connected, killer on the loose

By H. P. Albarelli

Brianna Maitland - On a freezing cold March 19, 2004, night at 11:20 p.m., 17-year old Brianna Maitland clocked out of her job at the historic Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery Center, Vermont.

Maitland had to get up early the next morning for her second job as a waitress in nearby St. Albans. Business at the Black Lantern had been bustling that night, and earlier that day she had spent several hours shopping with her mother Kellie. She was tired, she told fellow workers, and couldn’t stay for an after-closing dinner.

Less than two hours later, her car was spotted a mile from the inn, backed into the clapboard siding of an abandoned, roadside farmhouse. The vehicle, with its headlights still on, was empty except for two un-cashed paychecks and personal items on the front seat. Brianna Maitland had vanished.

Five weeks earlier, and 90 miles south of Montgomery Center, on a cold, snowy Feb. 9 evening at about 7:20 p.m., Maura Murray, a 21-year old University of Massachusetts student, drove her car into a snow bank on a sharp curve on Route 112 near Haverhill, N.H.

Maura Murray * Within a few minutes, a school bus driven by Butch Atwood stopped alongside Murray’s vehicle. Atwood, who told reporters he is a former police officer, asked Murray if she was okay and if she wanted him to alert local police. Murray, according to Atwood, said that she was fine and that she had already used her cell phone to call AAA for assistance.

Still concerned, Atwood continued up the road to his house, only about 100 yards away, and, once inside, telephoned police to report the accident. About 10 minutes later, a Haverhill police officer, and then a New Hampshire State Police trooper, arrived on the scene. Maura Murray’s car was empty and she had vanished.

The still unsolved disappearances of Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray have caused widespread feelings of insecurity among women throughout New Hampshire and Vermont, and have renewed fears that a serial killer may be on the loose.

The disappearances have served to shatter the long-standing reputations of the two states as geographically safe and tranquil havens from the ills of urban America. Both disappearances also have created deep concerns about law enforcement response procedures, as well as friction between the families of both missing women and the New Hampshire and Vermont State Police departments.

No longer safe

Throughout the 1900s, Vermont and New Hampshire were at the top of the nation’s list of states that were near-free from violent crimes and murder. Indeed, in the 1950s and early 1960s, Vermont experienced murder rates that were in the low single digits, sometimes escaping annual counts without any recorded killings. All that began to slowly but steadily change in the late 1960s and early 1970s. By the late 1970s and 1980s, murders doubled and tripled in the two states. In the 1990s, and thereafter, violent crime and murders rose astronomically, and much of it was directed at young women.

From 1970 to 2004 nearly 30 women vanished in the tiny states of Vermont and New Hampshire. Of that number, 10 eventually were found, most having been brutally murdered. In total, 19 women remain unaccounted for between the two states. By most authoritative counts, there are over 60 unsolved homicides in Vermont and New Hampshire that occurred during that period.

Over the past several decades, law enforcement authorities in both states repeatedly have claimed that the murdered and missing are the victims of a wide variety of causes, including runaways, domestic violence and crimes of passion and sexual predators. Law enforcement officials argue there is no evidence a serial killer is on the loose, but many people take exception with this.

These people point to the series of young women murdered in the two states during the 1970s and 1980s by a person the media dubbed the “Valley Killer.” The Valley Killer, who never has been apprehended or identified, is responsible for attacking at least seven women and for murdering at least six women. Included in the Valley Killer’s death count are several young women, who physically resemble Maitland and Murray.

With the recent disappearances of the two women, police continue to insist there are “no reasons to believe that a serial killer is on the loose.” Police maintain the unsolved cases are not connected in any way. But many people remain skeptical of that claim.

Says Maitland’s father, Bruce, “Just because there isn’t any evidence is not a reason to close the door on that theory, or any other. If you look at the vital statistics on all of these missing women, you’d see right away that most are startlingly similar. If none are related, then that means there are a good 100, or so, individual murderers out there roaming about free to do anything they want.”

‘She had a special charisma’

By all accounts, Brianna Alexandra Maitland was an extraordinary young woman. Beautiful beyond her years, creative, caring and fiercely independent, she was the envy of many of the girls who knew her. Maitland was as good as any man at shooting skeet, riding a snow mobile or all-terrain-vehicle, and she could track a deer for miles through the woods.
Title: Newspaper Articles #184
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:40:10 am
NMCO.ORG

About April 2006

A Circle of Hope

Family, friends and loved ones of Maura Murray met on May 2nd throughout parts of the country in ‘Circle of Hope’ ceremonies. Maura is the missing UMass nursing student who vanished from her one car accident on the evening of February 9, 2004 on Route 112 near Woodsville NH. Maura has not been seen since that evening.

Fred Murray, Maura’s father held a ‘Circle of Hope’ on Route 112 at the accident site in New Hampshire. A ‘Circle of Hope’ met in Maura’s hometown of Hanson, MA and was attended by Maura’s mother Laurie Murray, sister Kathleen, brothers Freddie and Kurtis, Grandmother Ruth Mehrman, aunts, cousins, numerous dear friends and neighbors. A ‘Circle of Hope’ was held by Fred Murray’s family and friends in Weymouth, MA. Laurie Murray’s brother, Ricky Mehrman, family and friends met in their ‘Circle of Hope’ in Yankton, SD. Maura’s sister Julie and Maura’s boyfriend Bill Rausch, both lieutenants in the army, joined in their ‘Circle of Hope’ at their respective army posts of Fort Bragg, NC and Fort Sill, OK. In Marengo, OH, Bill’s parents Bill and Sharon Rausch invited their family along with friends of Maura for a ‘Circle of Hope’ at their home. The UMass Track Team also met in a ‘Circle of Hope’ while participating in The Atlantic 10 Track Meet in Richmond, VA.

The ‘Circle of Hope’ ceremonies are expressions of Maura’s loved ones devotion and determination to bring her home. The date selected is to commemorate Maura’s 22nd birthday on May 4th. A large laminated photo of Maura adorned by a blue bow was displayed at each site as family, friends and loved ones joined hands to create a ‘Circle of Hope’. They also wore blue label ribbons and photo badges of Maura. Many shared their ‘hopes’ in bringing Maura home, recited poetry or special quotes. A prayer was offered to bring her home safely. At the conclusion of the ‘Circle of Hope’, “Somewhere Over The Rainbow/What A Wonderful World” by Iz Kamakawiwo’ole was played as 22 blue helium balloons were launched. The blue, soaring balloons are symbolic of Maura’s 22nd birthday and her loved ones hopes to bring her home. The color blue was chosen because it is Maura’s favorite color. Child Seek Network located in Mount Angel, OR donated many of the blue, label ribbons and photo badges.

The UMass Police in the National Center has listed Maura for Missing Adults as an endangered missing person. Maura has not used her cell phone, her ATM or other bank cards since the afternoon of her disappearance. The New Hampshire State Police are in charge of the investigation, although they refuse to investigate her disappearance as a criminal matter because they say there is no evidence of foul play. If you have seen Maura or have any information regarding her disappearance, please call the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636 or notify your local law enforcement. You can visit Maura’s website at www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html. In addition, you can also click on the following link to print a poster with Maura's photo and description.
Title: Newspaper Articles #185
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:40:40 am
New Hampshire Sunday News

April 16, 2006

Human remains found

By Garry Rayno and Shawne K. Wickham

CONCORD--A forensic anthropologist is being called in to help identify the man whose skeletal remains were found in a wooded area just off Interstate 93 Friday afternoon.

State and local authorities were excavating the area, down a steep embankment near Exit 12 southbound, for much of the day yesterday.

Assistant Attorney General David Ruoff, who is investigating the case for that office, said the remains, later determined to be those of an adult male, were found by a man walking in the woods shortly after 4 p.m. Friday. Police sealed off the area overnight, and authorities began searching the area and removing the remains yesterday morning.

The remains, Ruoff said, "appear to have been there a while, so it's going to take a while to make any kind of identification."

Ruoff said while there was once excavation required to uncover all the remains, the area "did not appear to be a burial site."

"It just seemed that it was leaves, and it has been there for a while, so there was some amount of soil covering."

Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Strelzin said clothing found at the scene and dental records will aid in determining who was found dead.

"We expect the earliest the identification will be made will be Monday," Strelzin said.

Asked if officials have an idea who the dead man may be, Ruoff said investigators have consulted the state police database on missing persons. "What we know has been run against the database and we have some hunches and suspicions, but we really have to wait until we know more," he said.

There are four individuals from New Hampshire posted on the New Hampshire State Police Web site's missing persons page. Three are women: Maura Murray, and Tina and Bethany Sinclair.

The only male is Lorne Boulet, born March 27, 1980. According to the Web site, he has been missing since July 29, 2001 from Chichester _ one town east of Concord. Asked if the remains discovered yesterday could be those of Lorne Boulet, Ruoff yesterday replied, "No comment."

Strelzin said, "We don't speculate on who we think those remains will be."

Louise Holmburg, Boulet's aunt, said last evening that she hadn't received word on whether the remains might be those of her nephew.

"I'm sitting here with a weight in my stomach," the Bristol woman said. "I've already chewed off my fingernails.

"The not knowing is very difficult," said Holmburg, who wears a sterling silver ring of Boulet's with blue stones. "Like everyone, we want positive answers. We want to find Lorne safe and that's how we keep searching."

Should it turn out to be him, she said, "It's going to be devastating."

Boulet's parents could not be reached. An answering machine at their home in Chichester contained this message: "If this is you, Lorne, we need to hear from you. We love you and we miss you."

His family has posted a Web site (www.findlorne.faith-web.com), worked with several missing persons organizations and even taken their search to the "Larry King Live" show on CNN.

According to the published reports, Lorne Boulet was diagnosed with schizophrenia just before he turned 20. A graduate of Pembroke Academy, he worked at the Concord Wal-Mart and lived with his parents in Chichester. The evening he disappeared, Boulet left home for a customary walk, taking no identification, cash or cell phone with him, according to his family.

Concord police are conducting the investigation into the body found Friday. The state police major crime unit was not called in, but Ruoff said that does not mean no crime was committed, as Concord is one of the cities that investigates its own homicide cases.

A deputy medical examiner initially examined the remains Friday evening, Strelzin said.

The state's chief medical examiner, Dr. Tom Andrew, was at the scene yesterday. The remains were to have been brought to the medical examiner's office at Concord Hospital for a forensic examination, which Ruoff said differs of the condition of the remains.

Ruoff said Andrew expects to call in Dr. Marcella Sorg, a Maine forensic anthoropologist who has worked with New Hampshire authorities on prior cases, to consult in the case. He was also planning to consult a forensic "odontologist," an expert in dental records.

Asked is the area was being treated as a crime scene, Ruoff said it was too soon to say whether the death appeared to be a homicide or accidental. The medical examiner, he said, "is not going to be able to make a determination on cause and manner" of death until he consults with Sorg.

Yesterday, a light-colored tarp could be seen at the bottom of the steep, 20-foot embankment near Exit 12 to South Main Street. Yellow police tape was placed along a short section of the woods, which are between the highway and the South End Marsh.

While investigators worked, police blocked off the right travel land of I-93 southbound from above Exit 14. Traffic was backed up and slowed to a crawl through the city at noontime.

--Staff Reporter Michael Cousineau contributed to this report.
Title: Newspaper Articles #186
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:41:12 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

June 11, 2006

When adults disappear

By Elise Castelli

Derry -- When Pail Gaffney vanished after leaving his Derry home for work in Massachusetts last month, there was no sign of foul play, no indication of an accident.

Derry police filed a report, followed up on leads gathered from interviews with friends and family of the 43-year-old, and put out a statewide attempt to locate" bulletin.

Gaffney's wife and six children were waiting and worrying. The disappearance was out of character, they said, for a man you could set your watch by."

But without evidence of a crime, police said, there was little more they could do because Gaffney, as an adult, had the right not to return home.

Bedford police found Gaffney -- unharmed, in his car -- on May 30, four days after his disappearance. They told him his family was worried and he should return home. He did.

The Gaffney incident typifies the missing-persons cases they run across each year, police say. But other cases -- such as those of college nursing student Maura Murray, who disappeared after a single-car crash in Haverhill more than two years ago, and Goffstown teen Laura Mackenzie, who was due to appear in court on shoplifting charges when she disappeared March 8 -- underscore the fact that New Hampshire has no standard reporting requirements or procedures in missing-adult cases.

State Police Sgt. Robert Estabrook, who handles missing persons cases, said procedure is based circumstances. If a person appears to have disappeared voluntarily and without having committed a crime, he said, the person has the legal right to remain missing.

(Adults) have the legal right to up and leave," Estabrook said. I can see how a loved one would be concerned with that, but you have a right to be missing."

In some instances, Derry Police Capt. Vernon Thomas said, the person who filed the report poses a risk to the missing person.

We have to be cautious about the source of the report," Thomas said

Erin Bruno, director of case management for the National Center for Missing Adults, said 99 percent of all adults reported missing are found safe -- and many don't want contact with the family they deserted.

For families of the missing, that may be hard to accept, Bruno said. In the family's defense, every minute a loved one is gone is a minute too many," she said. They're thinking the worst."

As of May 1, there were 108,801 people listed as missing in the National Crime Information Center database, including 50,177 adults. Because the NCIC has certain criteria for entering adults in the database, there may be many more missing adults who aren't included in the center's statistics, Bruno said.

According to the NCIC Web site, a missing adult can be entered into the national database if one of the following criteria is met:

The adult has a proven physical or mental disability;

The situation indicates physical danger;

The situation indicates the person is not missing voluntarily;

The person is missing after a catastrophe; or

There is reason to be concerned for the missing person's safety.

Unless the missing fall into one of those categories, some police agencies are reluctant to take reports on adults, Bruno said.

New Hampshire law does mandate that adults falling into any of the NCIC categories be reported to NCIC within 72 hours of the initial report. Federal law mandates all missing children be entered in the database regardless of circumstance.

At any given moment, there are at least 70 to 90 cases missing New Hampshire children and adults listed in the NCIC, said Estabrook.

When the disappearance is voluntary, the reasons for disappearing may be as disparate as the missing themselves, Bruno said. It could stem from family or marital troubles, from abuse, from debt, from addiction or crime.

Sometimes we don't know what's happened," she said.

Thomas, of the Derry Police, said the nature of the investigation depends on the circumstances.

Reports, bulletins, and interviews with relatives and friends are the standard in Derry on adult cases, he said. Family members are also told they should monitor bank, credit card and cell phone activity on statements, as the information can provide leads to the missing adult, Thomas said.

Often the investigation doesn't get very far before there is a break. Most (missing persons) turn up fairly quickly," Thomas said. But not all cases turn out like the Gaffney case.

Maura Murray remains missing more than two years after vanishing at age 21 after crashing her car in Haverhill.

Her father, Frederick Murray, recently filed an appeal with the state Supreme Court to unseal police records on her case. In an interview this week, he said reports from the early days of the case hold important clues that could be used by his team of private investigators to find his daughter.

Murray alleges the police are using claims of an ongoing investigation to avoid disclosure. In fact, he said, there is no active police investigation.

Bruno, the missing adults caseworker, said she would like to see national standards adopted that would require uniform investigation procedures for children and adults.

If there is not clear evidence of a crime, it doesn't mean the person was not a victim; there is just no evidence of it," she said.

One of the leads on Goffstown Police are pursuing in the Mackenzie case involves the timing of the teen's disappearance: the same day as her scheduled court date. Nevertheless, Goffstown Police Detective Kevin Laroche told the New Hampshire Union Leader, the case is baffling."

Laroche said a yearbook message Mackenzie wrote last fall sounded like much of what she had written in diaries and poetry, and seemed to forecast her disappearance. But, he added, it was so long before Mackenzie actually disappeared, We still think it was the arrest that made her run."

What exactly made Gaffney run, the family hasn't said definitively. On the day he returned his daughter Pauline said, We're just happy to have him home and want to spend as much time with him as possible."

For many families of the still missing that is all they want.
Title: Newspaper Articles #187
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:41:47 am
Northcountry News

Around July 28, 2006

Maura Murray, 2 1/2 Years After Her Disappearance

A Letter From Her Family

A Northcountry News Exsclusive

Our thanks to the Northcountry News and its Publisher Bryan Flagg for allowing the family of Maura Murray to 'speak' to its readers. As many of you know, Maura disappeared on February 9, 2004. She was last seen on Route 112 after a single car crash. Much has been said about Maura in the media and local coffee shops over the last two and a half years. Many of you have formed opinions of what happened and of Maura and her family based on what has been presented in the media and sometimes based on inaccurate rumors.

Maura is so much more than what has been presented in most of the papers. She is more than a missing person. Maura is a Missed Person, she is a daughter, a sister, granddaughter, niece, cousin and friend. My favorite quote about Maura is by one of her friends: "If you wanted to make a person, you would make her just like her." said Katie Jones a close friend of Maura's since grade school."

She is an accomplished athlete, a very intelligent young woman who was attending the University of Massachusetts Amherst on a scholarship while working two part-time jobs to help pay her expenses. She had scored 1420 on her SAT (740 in Math) and had been majoring in Chemical Engineering at West Point when she transferred to UMass in late January 2002. Maura continued her pursuit of Chemical Engineering Degree through her first two semesters at UMass until she decided she would rather be in the medical field.

Maura had been recruited by many schools to run track and cross country. She competed in Track and Cross Country for both West Point and UMass Amherst until the fall of 2003. As a high school freshman, she played point guard on the girls' varsity basketball team and was a good softball pitcher.

Maura also loved to camp and hike, and her favorite camping and vacation spot is in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Her father had been taking the family there since she was a small child. Fred, Maura and Billy had spent a vacation together in the White Mountains in July of 2003. We know that Maura loved your area.

Was Maura perfect--no. Did she have alcohol in the car--it appears so. Was she drinking--quite possibly. Does it matter??? Maura has been missing for almost two and a half years. Our family will continue to look for her as long as we have the ability to do so. There are those who speculate that Maura took off to start a new life. Our family does not discount anything, but believes this to be the least likely scenario for many reasons. We have no idea why Maura left Amherst, or how she came to be in your area. We know that she had hand written directions to Burlington in her car, and we know she made a call to a person who rents a condo in Bartlett that afternoon. We also know that she placed a call to a Stowe, VT information line. The car she was driving had had some mechanical problems. We're not sure whether she had not yet decided which area to head to or whether she had car trouble. Because of the way her car was found with the front end facing west, but in the east bound lane, we don't even know for sure whether at the time of the accident she was headed east or west.

Though there was apparently something bothering Maura, we believe that based on the fact that she only took a couple of outfits and things like tooth whitener and text books she was going away for a couple of days to think things through. Despite some of what was in the newspapers, she was not having difficulty in her relationship with her boyfriend, Billy Rausch. In fact had sent him an email that day telling him I love you more--". Although Billy had not yet given Maura her diamond, they were openly making plans to be married after she graduated in 2005. Maura had made arrangements in January 2004 to be employed for the summer of 2004 at a hospital near Billy in Lawton OK.

We have been so focused on finding out what happened to Maura, we don't always take the time to voice our appreciation for those who have helped us in our search, those who have had the courage to tell us about rumors, those who have given so freely of their time and energy. Because we have made friends in the area, we are aware of a particularly ugly rumor being spread very effectively. I won't discuss it except to say that it is false and may hamper our ability to find out what happened--and I for one have to ask why someone would spread such malicious rumors? Why does someone feel it is necessary to add to a family's pain? Why would anyone want to put down a family searching for a missing loved one?? To me it appears that someone sees some benefit from refocusing the attention away from the essential fact--Maura Murray hasn't been seen or heard from since February 9, 2004. Her credit cards have not been used, her cell phone was never used again, and it is our understanding that there has been no activity on her social security number.

Maura wasn't perfect and yet her disappearance has touched more people than we could have imagined. Originally, our family put up a website in the hopes of providing her friends a place to talk about her. What we found is that most of her family and friends found it too painful. Instead, we have drawn many wonderful people from Haverhill and the surrounding areas. We have people posting from all over the country and Canada. We have attracted others who have lost loved ones or had painful experiences such as being abducted. Sometimes what is said on the website is controversial and sometimes there is a post that makes us realize that there is more than the controversy--such as this post by the daughter of Audrey Groat who has been missing for 13 years: thank you all for your support, this has been a good place for me to let out some of the feelings I have been carrying for so long. It means a lot to me that so many people care, and are supportive. I really appreciate it as an adult and really wish something like this could have helped us years ago, as kids."

As with Maura, Audrey Groat is more than a missing person--she was a mother whose six young daughters were left without a mom. Though there is much more information on Maura's site, I hope you will read the info presented by the Vermont State Police at http://www.dps.state...ssing/groat.htm . As with Maura--somebody knows something, not only about Audrey Groat, but others who are missing or whose murderers have not been apprehended--Tina and Bethany Sinclair, Brianna Maitland, Laura MacKenzie and so many more. It is time to come forward, even if it has to be anonymously, our families need answers.

We would like to thank the Molly Bish Foundation for their efforts on behalf of Maura and our family and those private detectives, who through the Molly Bish foundation have volunteered their time and expertise to help find out what happened to Maura; those who have spent so much time and effort trying to figure out what happened to Maura; those who have taken the time to speak with Fred or others helping us. As Maura's dad, Fred, has said, So many people have selflessly and enthusiastically given of themselves and their time, that if force of will were enough by itself, then Maura would have been back with us many months ago. When people ask me if there is anything that they can do, I tell them that I know they would already have done it if there were.

Your universally overwhelming support is a striking demonstration, yet again, of the inherent goodness of people. You can sense my gratitude, but I want your thank you" to come to you when you look in the mirror and see reflected a person who, by choice, interrupted his or her life to try to help another human being in trouble. If there is any worthier motivation than that, we'd all be hard pressed to name what it is.

In Deep Appreciation,

Fred Murray"

If you know anything or saw anything no matter how insignificant you might believe it to be, it might be the one piece of the puzzle that we are looking for. Please contact us. We can be reached at two email addresses MauraMissing@hotmail.com or MissingMaura@comcast.net. We can also be reached at MauraMurray.com, P.O. Box 466, Humarock, MA 02047. If you have a significant piece of information, you can also contact Lt. Mark Mudgett of the New Hampshire State Police, Major Crimes Unit at (603) 271-2663 and NH State Police Headquarters (603) 271-3636.

(A note from the publisher - I would like to thank the family of Maura Murray for contacting the Northcountry News and allowing us the opportunity to help in their continued efforts of finding out just what happened to Maura. The loss of a friend, a loved one, a family member is never easy for any of us, but to lose one under such bizarre circumstances is surely difficult -and the continued void of the unknown for friends and family is something that most of us will hopefully never have to come to know. It is our hope that someday soon, the family and friends of Maura Murray can at the very least have a closure to this very long and undaunted chapter in their lives.)
Title: Newspaper Articles #188
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:42:37 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

September 2, 2006

Mackenzie says she's sorry

By Stephen Beale

Laura Mackenzie apologized this week for the pain she caused when she disappeared from Goffstown last March, only to turn up five months later living and working as a waitress in St. Augustine, Fla.

"I am sorry, and I need to ask everyone to forgive me for what I did, putting them through the hardships and pain of 5 long months where I was missing," Mackenzie said in an online statement.

Mackenzie posted her written apology on a Web site dedicated to Maura Murray, a 22-year-old who was last seen in Woodsville on Feb. 9, 2005.
Title: Newspaper Articles #189
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:43:03 am
The Hew Hampshire Union Leader / Lowell Sun / Nashua Telegraph

September 4, 2006

Note: The Nashua Telegraph has a different headline and additional information in italics below.

Goffstown teenager apologizes

Mackenzie says shes sorry on site dedicated to missing Mass. woman

Teen apologizes on site dedicated to missing Mass. woman

GOFFSTOWN, N.H . (AP) — A Goffstown teen found in Florida last month after a five-month search is apologizing — on a Web site set up to help find a young Massachusetts woman who disappeared in New Hampshire two and a half years ago.

Laura Mackenzie does not say why she left New Hampshire in March, but she asks for forgiveness in a message posted on a Web site dedicated to the search for Maura Murray, the Hanson, Mass., woman who disappeared in northern New Hampshire after a minor car crash in February 2004.

“I am sorry, and I need to ask everyone to forgive me for what I did, putting them through the hardships and pain of five long months where I was missing,” Mackenzie wrote.

Mackenzie disappeared from Goffstown in March 8, the same day she was scheduled to appear in on shoplifting charges. As authorities began a nationwide search and her anxious family pleaded for information on her whereabouts, Mackenzie moved to Florida, where she was found on August 7.

Mackenzie’s message says she did not realize authorities were engaged in an all-out search for her for five months as she tried to avoid detection by not using her bank card or checking e-mail and keeping her driving to a minimum.

“I never knew there was a search for me going on, and I had never dreamed of something to the extent that there was,” she wrote online.

Mackenzie is entering New Hampshire Community Technical College in Manchester this fall, focusing on business and marketing.

Mackenzie said she heard about Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, from a friend and had been reading articles about other missing people from New Hampshire. “I just wanted to give them a little hope because I was found,” Mackenzie said of Murray’s family. “There are a lot of different ways that could be looked at. I just thought that I might have a different perspective.”

Mackenzie said people should realize that, like herself, Murray could turn up anywhere.

Mackenzie also said she regretted the effort and expense Goffstown Police put into the search. The department has asked that the Superior Court to consider making reimbursement part of any sentencing on the shoplifting charge.

“I know they’ve spent a lot of money they shouldn’t have spent because it was a stupid mistake,” she said. If her parents end up compensating police, Mackenzie said she will pay them back after she graduates from college and has a job.
Title: Newspaper Articles #190
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:43:27 am
The Patriot Ledger

September 4, 2006

New Hampshire teen offers apology to searchers; Laura Mackenzie’s message on Web site for Hanson woman

By Patriot Ledger News Services

The Web site set up to help find Maura Murray, the Hanson woman who disappeared in northern New Hampshire after a minor car crash in February 2004, contains an apology from a Goffstown, N.H., teen found in Florida last month after a five-month search.

Laura Mackenzie does not say why she left New Hampshire in March, but she asks for forgiveness in the message.

‘‘I am sorry, and I need to ask everyone to forgive me for what I did, putting them through the hardships and pain of five long months where I was missing,’’ Mackenzie wrote.

Mackenzie disappeared from Goffstown on March 8, the same day she was scheduled to appear in court on shoplifting charges.

As authorities began a nationwide search and her anxious family pleaded for information on her whereabouts, Mackenzie moved to Florida, where she was found Aug. 7.

Mackenzie’s message says she did not realize authorities were engaged in an all-out search for her for five months as she tried to avoid detection by not using her bank card or checking e-mail and keeping her driving to a minimum.

‘‘I never knew there was a search for me going on, and I had never dreamed of something to the extent that there was,’’ she wrote online.

Mackenzie said she heard about Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, from a friend and had been reading articles about other missing people from New Hampshire.

‘‘I just wanted to give them a little hope because I was found,’’ Mackenzie said of Murray’s family. ‘‘There are a lot of different ways that could be looked at. I just thought that I might have a different perspective.’’

Mackenzie said people should realize that, like herself, Murray could turn up.
Title: Newspaper Articles #191
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:44:04 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader / North Adams Transcript / Boston Globe

September 22/23/24, 2006

Missing woman’s dad seeks information

By Associated Press

Concord, N.H. - It’s been over two years since Maura Murray disappeared after her car got stuck in a snow bank in Haverhill, and her father hasn’t given up his quest for information.

Fred Murray is asking the state Supreme Court to rule on his right to-know request for police records.

Since his daughter’s disappearance, Murray, of Weymouth, Mass., has repeatedly attempted to obtain reports, log files and all information collected from Feb. 9,2004, to the present.

His requests were made to the Grafton County attorney’s office; the attorney general’s office; Gov. John Lynch; the Hanover Police Department, state police; Major Crimes and the Historic Case Unit; the Fish and Game Department; and the University of Massachusetts Police at Amherst. Maura Murray was a student at UMass.

The defendants have denied the request, citing an exception in the law created by the New Hampshire Supreme Court for law enforcement investigative files. Police and the attorney general’s office maintain that the release of other records could result in the destruction of evidence and witness intimidation.

Murray claims that invoking the exception is misplaced, as police have characterized Maura’s case as a missing person matter and not a criminal investigation.
Title: Newspaper Articles #192
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:44:32 am
The Caledonian-Record

(INCOMPLETE?)

Wednesday, October 4, 2006

Housing, Food And Water Needed

Canine Teams To Search For Maura Murray

By Gary E. Lindsley

Housing, gas cards, food and water are being sought for canine teams that will be searching for Maura Murray. Murray disappeared after a Feb. 9, 2004, car crash in Haverhill, N.H. About five or six canine teams will be searching a large area around the crash site Oct. 21-22, said John M. Healy of Warner, N.H. Warner and other volunteer investigators began working on Murray's disappearance in late 2005.

The canine teams will concentrate on a few sites, including several areas around French Pond Road. Healy said one of the areas the teams will search is a very large sand pit at the Morrill Construction site. "I could bury 3,000 bodies in there," he said.

If you wish to help this effort contact:

John M. Healy

603-746-4994

Benjamin S. McDonald

603-759-2340
Title: Newspaper Articles #193
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:45:03 am
Boston Globe

(INCOMPLETE?)

October 4, 2006

Dog teams to search where Maura Murray last seen

HAVERHILL, N.H. --Volunteer investigators with dogs hope to search the area where college student Maura Murray disappeared after crashing her car into a snowbank more than two years ago.

Murray, who was 21 and a student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst when she got into a minor accident on Route 112, has not been seen since the night of Feb. 9, 2004, when a man who lived nearby offered to get her help. He has said she declined.
Title: Newspaper Articles #194
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:45:31 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

October 4, 2006

In Brief - Maura Murray search continues Oct. 21

HAVERHILL -- Volunteer private investigators and K-9 handlers are teaming up on Saturday, Oct. 21, to search the area where Maura Murray disappeared more than two years ago.

Volunteers from the New Hampshire League of Investigators are asking for donations such as bottled water, drinks, snacks, meals and lunches to support the effort. They are also asking for lodging and gas cards, to be used by owners of the out-of-state K-9 search dogs and their family members.

Property owners near the location where Murray disappeared are also asked to provide access and cooperation during the effort.

Murray disappeared in Februrary 2004 after a minor automobile accident. Anyone interested in helping out is urged to contact John Healy at 746-4994 or Benjamin McDonald at 759-2340.
Title: Newspaper Articles #195
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:45:51 am
New Hampshire Sunday News

October 15, 2006

No link seen to Maura Murray disappearance

New Hampshire State Police don't think the murder of a Vermont college student this month is connected with a missing Massachusetts student whose abandoned car was found in northern New Hampshire in February 2004.

"I believe someone is looking into that, but they don't believe it has anything to do with that," said a state police dispatcher.

Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student from Hanson, Mass., disappeared in February 2004 after a minor car accident on Route 112 in Woodsville several miles from the Vermont border.

In the recent Vermont case, the body of missing University of Vermont student Michelle Gardner-Quinn was found Friday in Richmond, Vt., near Burlington.

Meanwhile, private investigators and K-9 dog handlers volunteering their help plan next weekend to search the area of Murray's disappearance.
Title: Newspaper Articles #196
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:46:19 am
Boston Globe

October 23, 2006

Dog teams hunt for missing student

Specially trained dogs searched over the weekend for a student from University of Massachusetts at Amherst who disappeared in February 2004 after crashing her car on Route 112. But the cadaver-sniffing dogs failed to find Maura Murray. Donations helped pay for the search by volunteer dog handlers in the Woodsville area. Private investigators also have been working on the case of the 22-year-old Hanson, Mass., woman. Don Nason of the New Hampshire League of Investigators said the dogs picked up some scents, but nothing conclusive.

Unknown Publication, cited as the Boston Globe, with variations

Search dogs fail to find Maura Murray, missing 2 years

HAVERHILL, N.H. --Specially trained dogs searched over the weekend for a college student in the area where she disappeared after crashing her car in Haverhill (New Hampshire).

But the cadaver-sniffing dogs failed to find Maura Murray, who was last seen near the crash site on Route 112 two-and-a-half years ago.
Title: Newspaper Articles #197
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:46:44 am
The Caledonian-Record

Monday, October 23, 2006

K-9 Teams Search For Student Who Disappeared In 2004 - Family Of Maura Murray Want Closure

By Gary E. Lindsley

Haverhill, N.H. -- Nearly 2 1/, the family and friends of a missing Massachusetts woman released blue balloons and tacked a big blue bow to a tree in hopes she would be found.

As police K-9 teams searched for Maura Murray on Saturday, that blue bow was still tacked to the tree her car struck on Route 112 the night of Feb. 9, 2004, a stark reminder that she is still missing.

The hope that Murray is still alive is waning, and family and friends now want closure.

Murray was a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student driving west on Route 112 in Haverhill when she lost control of her black 1996 Saturn as it rounded a sharp left-hand curve near The Weathered Barn and crashed.

Butch Atwood, a school bus driver who lived just up the road from the crash scene, was on his way home in his bus when he found the Saturn off the road.

Atwood said he spoke with Murray and offered to call for help, but she declined. He went to his house to call EMS anyway. When Haverhill Police Sgt. Cecil Smith arrived about 10 minutes later, according to Atwood, Murray was gone.

She has not been seen nor heard from since.

As five K-9 teams searched six areas of interest within 5 miles of the crash scene on Saturday, Maura's sister, Kathleen Carpenter of Hanover, Mass., waited anxiously at a lodge at Mountain Lakes off of French Pond Road.

"I want closure," Carpenter said. "It's every day ... you wake up and wonder. My Mom keeps saying she is going to come home. I know in my heart she won't. Something went wrong."

Carpenter spoke about how she and Maura shared a bedroom together while growing up and used to have the normal sisterly fights, like over clothing.

"She was just like me, very trusting," Carpenter said. "She would go up to a total stranger. That's how I believe she was taken advantage of. She was too trusting."

Police dog teams, including Connecticut Canine Search and Dukes County Search & Rescue from Martha's Vineyard, along with the New Hampshire League of Investigators, volunteered to search for Murray Saturday and Sunday.

"I don't want this to become a cold case," Carpenter said.

Patty Davidson, who is Maura's third cousin and is from Weymouth, Mass., also does not want to give up hope Maura will be found. Yet, she is realistic.

"I think she met up with foul play that night," Davidson said. "She was at the wrong place at the wrong time. Someone picked her up and did her harm."

When Maura's father, Fred Murray, arrived Saturday, he spent some time with the investigators being updated on the searches so far.

Getting a chance to sit down, Fred Murray said he was very impressed with the scope and thoroughness of the search efforts.

"It's coherent and they have a plan and they are marching with it," he said. "It's methodical. I am deeply appreciative of the time and effort of everyone. I think they are motivated by kindness."

Murray was hopeful the weekend's search would rule out some possible sites, including area gravel pits and the Mountain Lakes area.

Don Nason, a member of the New Hampshire League of Investigators, said six areas were chosen, including a wooded area near the search site, because of information Fred Murray and other people have provided. He declined to reveal the areas.

Nason did talk about why they were searching a sand pit. He said it is not far from where Maura had her accident and went missing.

"We are not necessarily looking for Maura's remains, but something that belongs to her," he said. "The important thing is to keep [the investigation] going. If someone knows something but is afraid to open his mouth, give [state police] a call. Or contact [Maura's] Web site."

Murray said he will not stop until he finds out what happened to his daughter on Feb. 9, 2004.

"It just doesn't end [for the families]," he said. "So many people go missing every day all around the country."

A brother-and-sister team, Al and Marian Beland, along with their canines Taz and Tracer, were part of the search teams during the weekend.

The Belands have about 18 years experience in search and rescue between them.

"I think we all have strengths and weaknesses and can use them to help people," Marian Beland said. "I am pretty much like a volunteer fire department. I cannot fight fires, but I can search. I want to put our training to good use."

Al Beland said helping find people is part of his personality.

"It is ingrained," he said. "We just want to help. We train hard and we hopefully can bring closure to some of these cold cases. Hopefully, we can find clues that will lead to the successful termination of the investigation."

Back at the lodge, Carpenter said she, Maura and her family used to camp in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

"I would like to be able to do that again," she said.

Late Sunday afternoon, Nason said the K-9 teams had several hits, but nothing that would warrant forwarding to state police. An area near a dam and a snowmobile corridor in Warren also was searched, he said, but nothing was found and it did not look promising.

Anyone who may have information about Murray is asked to contact the New Hampshire State Police major crimes unit at 603-271-2663 or 800-852-3411.
Title: Newspaper Articles #198
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:47:06 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

October 24, 2006

Search dogs fail to find Maura Murray

By Associated Press

Haverhill -- Specially trained dogs searched over the weekend for a University of Massachusetts at Amherst student who disappeared after crashing her car.

But the cadaver-sniffing dogs failed to find Maura Murray, who was last seen near the crash site on Route 112 more than two years ago.

Donations helped pay for the search by volunteer dog handlers in the Woodsville area. Private investigators also have been working on the case.

Don Nason, of the New Hampshire League of Investigators, said the dogs picked up some scents, but nothing conclusive.
Title: Newspaper Articles #199-Part 1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:47:41 am
North Country News

November 2, 2006

(1 of 2)

By Bryan Flagg

The Webster’s Dictionary defines “Closure” as: an act of closing: the condition of being closed - a simple word that the family and friends of Maura Murray desperately want, certainly need and well deserve.

This coming February will mark the 3rd year anniversary of the disappearance of Maura Murray. Maura disappeared on Monday, February 9, 2004 at approximately 7:30 pm following a minor accident on Route 112 near Woodsville, NH. A witness stopped and spoke with Maura then called police from their nearby home and when police arrived about 10 minutes later Maura was missing and remains a missing person to this day.

The Northcountry News was sent a media package and were notified of a search to be held on October 21st and 22nd that would be lead by the NH League of Investigators.

In continuation of this non-stop effort, the NH League of Investigators, in conjunction with the Molly Bish Foundation, the Murray Family, and volunteer K9 search teams- searched various areas in the towns of Woodsville and Haverhill over the weekend.

The K9s, known as cadaver dogs, are trained in finding human remains among a wide variety of other areas of search & rescue. It was stated that some of the dogs can even sniff out and find a human body in water which could be up to 200’ deep.

The NH League of Investigators stated, “The difficult part of this project is realizing that we are not only looking for evidence, but that we are also looking for Maura’s remains. Although it is not the ultimate outcome we all wish for, we would be remiss to not include that possibility and spend a great deal of our time toward this potential outcome. Many qualified people have had input into the current project search area. One major motivating force has been from input received from Dr. Maurice Godwin of Godwin Trial and Forensic Consultancy, Inc., www.investigativepsych.com. Dr. Godwin has been successful in the past in determining geological profiles for deceased missing persons and we are grateful for his input in this case. Please view Dr. Godwin’s website outlining his services and history for more information.”

Aside from the many man hours that the NH State Police, Fish & Game and Haverhill PD have previously spent on the case, volunteers from the NH League of Investigators have spent countless hours working leads and interviewing witnesses as well, turning over all information gathered to the NH State Police Major Crimes Unit.

My wife and I arrived at the Lodge at Mountain Lakes at about 8am on a cold Saturday morning of October 21st. Members from the NH League of Investigators and the volunteer K9 units from The Connecticut Canine Search & Rescue and Duke’s Country Search & Rescue of Martha’s Vineyard were already on site preparing for a busy schedule ahead.

The media was not invited into the lodge right away. Briefings were to be held for members of the search teams first -and security into the building was pretty tight at that point. However, after the briefings had been held and K9 search teams were off to several undisclosed locations, media outlets were very welcomed to go into the Lodge, talk to family members and enjoy a hot coffee or tea and some breakfast.

We have spoken several times to Helena Murray over the past, either via email or on the phone. She has been our initial contact for information in the past. She was the first family member we met Saturday, sat down with several times, and became instant friends with. Helena has basically taken finding Maura on as a full time job at this point and is the driving force behind the “MauraMurray.com” website. She is a fantastic lady who has put her heart and soul into this entire ongoing project.

Helena wrote a wonderful letter about Maura which was published in the Northcountry News back in August of this year. To this day I remember one of the sentences - she wrote, “Maura is so much more than a missing person, Maura is a missed person. She is a daughter, a sister, granddaughter, niece, cousin and friend.” No one has said it any better than that.

We met and talked with several other family members including cousins, friends and Maura’s sister, Kathleen. All of whom were very pleasant and willing to share stories with us about Maura - some funny, some sad and some very moving.

We also met and spent some time with Maura’s father, Fred on Saturday. A person who has been stated in the past as being very hard and negative on the investigation of state and local authorities throughout the searches and investigation.

We found Fred to be a very caring and concerned individual, who is certainly not afraid to state what’s on his mind at the time. “There are simply a lot of questions which have yet to be answered,” he states. “Right from the beginning, things have seemingly been fouled up, this is a missing person, a person who may have met with foul play, and there are so many questions which have not been answered,” he continues. As we are talking, you can see that this is a man who is genuinely frustrated. “All I want is to find my daughter, it’s been over two years now, I just want to find my daughter.”

He is also frustrated with the politics of trying to get records released from the initial investigation, stating that there could be items that the police have under wraps in which family members might just have some insight on, a computer system that may give family members a clue to what may have happened or who she may have been in contact with prior to her disappearance. “Wouldn’t that help the investigation, not hinder it,” he asks. “I simply want some answers,” he states.“ I try to have a positive attitude, I wake up and put one foot in front of the other, in hopes they just might lead me in the right direction.”

His next attempt at getting records released through the NH Court system is set for some time in November.

It remains a missing person case at this point in time, basically due to the fact that there has been no evidence to support foul play. The state and local authorities have been adamant in stating that it is definitely an on-going investigation. Yet, Fred points out that Maura’s vehicle, a black Saturn sits in plain view, unprotected outside of the State Police Troop F facilities in Twin Mountain.
Title: Newspaper Articles #199-Part 2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:48:15 am
North Country News

November 2, 2006

(2 of 2)

By Bryan Flagg

Fred asks, “if the investigation leads law enforcement officials to believe that there was foul play involved, what chain of evidence could they prove on Maura’s car at this point?

It has been sitting outside, not in any locked holding area for quite a long time now!”

“There were things that were done, and things which were not done that you just have to shake your head at and wonder,” states Fred.

Fred did say that he was very pleased with the way the search effort was going, stating that the areas chosen for this search were being searched methodically and thoroughly.

Cadaver dogs and their handlers avidly worked over the two day search. It was a different type of search this time- meaning nobody other than the handlers, their K9s and investigators from the NH League were permitted to follow or search along with them. It was a well planned, well thought out and very direct search. They knew what areas they wanted to look at, had maps and coordinates of those areas -and that’s where they searched.

Although it was stated that the dogs did have several “hits,” it has been stated by Don Nason, an investigator from the NH League of Investigators, that they were not substantial enough to warrant passing on the information to the NH State Police at this time.

Sunday was a different story, we spent much of the day with Fred and several other people at an undisclosed search site in a location well away from Mountain Lakes.

There are several other promising sites scattered around a radius of the Haverhill and Woodsville area. There have been a number of psychics who have been actively involved with the Murray case from the beginning and who have been feeding information to family members and friends along the way.

“Some of the information makes sense and then there’s lots you have to sift through,” states Fred as we walk through an area of woods looking for a sign of anything out of the ordinary.

It is easy to see that searching for his daughter has become an obsession for Fred, who states he owes it to his daughter to keep searching and to find the answers to the many questions which remain after almost three years. “As soon as my feet leave the bed and land on the floor in the morning, it is on my mind,” states Fred. “It just never ends, and I will keep searching until I find out what happened to my daughter.”

After spending several hours in the woods, we head back to where we had started. Nothing new, nothing gained but an area for a future search which gives Fred hope and the incentive to continue forward.

As Fred hops in my truck and I drive him back to pick up his vehicle I can’t help but wonder how he and those closest to Maura have had the strength to carry on for almost three years with no answers at all. A daughter, a sister, a friend who is in your life one moment, and gone without a trace in the next. The things most of us just read about or see on television.

It simply doesn’t seem fair I think to myself as I glance over at Fred, no one should have to go through anything like this. Living each day with this on your mind constantly, searching for that one tip, that one anonymous letter, that one big hit from a cadaver dog, a witness to come forward or anything that might bring just a little more hope in finding Maura.

The Murray Family would like to thank the many people who were involved in the recent search efforts. From the investigators to the K9 Teams and from the people who supplied food to the people who supplied places to stay. “There are no words to thank those who have helped in so many ways, it’s overwhelming,” states Helena Murray. We have had so much support from so many different people.”

They would also like to thank their many supporters in the Haverhill and Woodsville area and especially those who allowed them to search their properties and the surrounding area once again.

If anyone has any information regarding the Maura Murray Case, please contact the NH State Police Major Crimes Unit at 603-271-2663 or 1-800-852-3411.

Publisher’s note: The Northcountry News has committed to the Murray Family in helping in any way possible. Whether it be printing the latest news on the Maura case, or to be there during future search efforts. My wife and I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Murray Family for spending a great deal of time with us, for making us feel at home and for allowing us into their lives and thoughts-even if just for a brief moment.

Letter To The Editor Written By Helena Murray As It Appears In The November 3rd Issue Of The Northcountry News I wanted to offer my personal thanks to the residents and business in the area who offered your help, your homes, information and goods and services to aid in the search held for Maura Murray on October 21st and 22nd. The outpouring of help and support was remarkable and overwhelming.

As many of you know by now, we did not find Maura. It is very difficult to reconcile the emotions in that statement. It is both good news and bad news. I can only tell you that we will continue to search for Maura until we find her. Knowing that we now have so many more helping us look gives more hope that she will be found.

We are all so busy with our own jobs, families and lives that the spirit of compassion on such a grand scale is rarely seen today in our society…the compassion and support shown to our family was heartwarming. Not only did we feel welcome, we felt as though we were a part of your community…neighbor, helping neighbor. I have personally spoken to and thanked many of you, and wish I could thank each of you individually, but I realize that I don’t even know everybody who offered or gave help.

I would be remiss if I did not also thank those from the Molly Bish Foundation, the New Hampshire League of Investigators, the Licensed Private Detectives of Massachusetts, Sabre Security, Kenney Communications and so many others who helped to make this search possible. A special thank to those at Mountain Lakes who not only allowed us to use the Lodge, but put up with our comings and goings all weekend.

With respect and thanks,

Helena Murray
Title: Newspaper Articles #200
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:48:39 am
Worcester Telegram & Gazette AP State News

(INCOMPLETE?)

About November 14, 2006

Missing woman's father in court seeking police records.

Concord, N.H.-- The father of a missing Massachusetts college student asked the New Hampshire Supreme Court on Tuesday to release police records and evidence in her disappearance.

Maura Murray, 21, was last seen shortly after crashing her car in a snowbank off Route 112 in Haverhill on Feb. 9, 2004.

That was nearly three years ago, and her father, Fred Murray, of Weymouth, Mass., said he is frustrated at the apparent lack of progress in the police investigation - and the state's refusal to share any information with him or private investigators.

"I'm a little angry that it has to come to this, that you have a missing persons case that can remain under investigation for 50 years," he said before the hearing. "It's absolute stonewalling."

Murray's lawyer, Timothy Ervin, argued that while exemptions to the state Right-to-Know Law and the federal Freedom of Information Act allow police to withhold evidence in open investigations, they cannot withhold all 2,500 records indefinitely. He asked that a judge review the records to determine whether some should be released.

"The court has to make a specific showing that disclosure would interfere with the ongoing investigation," he said.

Senior Assistant Attorney General Nancy Smith argued the records, including witness interviews, phone records and police reports, could become critical evidence in a criminal prosecution.

"We empathize and sympathize with Mr. Murray's concern over the disappearance of his daughter," she said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #201
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:49:21 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Portsmouth Herald / Sun Journal

November 15, 2006

Notes: The Sun Journal article is less complete

By Katharine Webster

Associated Press

CONCORD - The father of a missing Massachusetts college student was at the New Hampshire Supreme Court on Tuesday seeking police records and evidence in her disappearance.

Maura Murray, 21. was last seen shortly after crashing her car in a snowbank off Route 112 in Haverhill on Feb. 9, 2004.

That was nearly three years ago, and her father. Fred Murray, of Weymouth, Mass., said he is frustrated at the apparent lack of progress in the police investigation — and the state’s refusal to share any information with him or private investigators.

“I’m a little angry that it has to come to this, that you have a missing persons case that can remain under investigation for 50 years," he said before the hearing. "It’s absolute stonewalling."

Murray’s lawyer, Timothy Ervin, argued that while exemptions to the state Right to-Know Law and the federal Freedom of Information Act allow police to withhold evidence in open investigations, they cannot withhold all 2,500 records indefinitely. He asked that a judge review the records to determine whether some should be released.

"The court has to make a specific showing that disclosure would interfere with the ongoing investigation," he said.

Senior Assistant Attorney General Nancy Smith argued the records, including witness interviews, phone records and police reports, could become critical evidence in a criminal prosecution.
Title: Newspaper Articles #202
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:49:48 am
Valley News

November 16, 2006

Police Dive for Evidence Comes Up Empty

By Mark Davis

Pike, n.h.-- Police and a dive team spent three hours yesterday searching for "evidence" in the waters of an abandoned quarry on Lily Pond Road, less than a mile from a murder in September 2005 that remains unsolved.

Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams would not say for which investigation the search was executed, and declined to specify what kind of evidence police and the dive team were looking for.

"We're in the middle of an investigation," he said. "I can't tell you what we're investigating. It's a search for evidence."

Members of the New Hampshire Fish & Game Department and the Fire Marshal's Office were also at the abandoned slate quarry, immediately off the west side of Lily Pond Road, about two miles north of Route 25C.

Also there was Mike Conrad, whose brother, Tom, was shot dead on the porch of his home on Lily Pond Road on the night of Sept. 28. Authorities have declared his death a homicide but have charged no one and have released little information about their investigation.

Mike Conrad, who lived next door to his brother, said he was "interested" in yesterday's activities but referred questions to police.

Conrad spent several minutes talking with the Fish & Game divers, and said later he had told authorities of two more nearby quarries that could be searched.

Tomorrow would have been Tom Conrad's 56th birthday.

An underwater camera device, which Fish & Game officials likened to a "mini-submarine," returned images to a video monitor from beneath the water, 12 to 15 feet deep, but the water was too murky to see much, officials said.

Fish and Game officer Tom Dakai also dove into the quarry. "My eyes couldn't see anything once I got down there," Dakai said.

In addition to Conrad's death, one other Haverhill incident remains unsolved -- the disappearance of Maura Murray, the Massachusetts college student who crashed her car into a snowbank in February 2004 and has not been seen since.

Murray's father was at the New Hampshire Supreme Court Wednesday demanding that police turn over thousands of pages of documents from their investigation.

Conrad said that shortly after his brother died, he posted several notices with a picture of Tom and the message: "Do you know who murdered me?" including one nailed to a tree only yards from the quarry.

"The more people see it, then maybe they'll think of something and come forward," Mike Conrad said. "Police say it can't hurt."

Mark Davis can be reached at mcdavis@vnews.com or (603) 727-3304.
Title: Newspaper Articles #203
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:50:13 am
MyFox Boston

December 20, 2006

Court: Police Must Justify Secret Files in Murray Disappearance

CONCORD, N.H. -- The state Supreme Court ruled Wednesday state police must give more detailed descriptions and reasons for withholding their investigative files in the disappearance of Massachusetts college student Maura Murray.

State police "have not met their burden to demonstrate how disclosure of the requested documents could reasonably be expected to interfere with any investigation or enforcement proceedings," the court said in a unanimous decision.

Murray was 21 years old when she was last seen on the night of Feb. 9, 2004, shortly after crashing her car into a snowbank next to Route 112 in Haverhill.

Her father, Fred Murray, of Weymouth, Mass., had sued to obtain the investigative files under the state Right-to-Know Law, saying the information would aid private investigators trying to determine her fate. However, the volunteer private investigators disagreed that police should be required to disclose their files.
Title: Newspaper Articles #204
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:50:41 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader / The Concord Monitor

December 21, 2006

Court to rehear Murray suit - Justices: Police must justify secretiveness

By Katharine Webster

CONCORD -- The state Supreme Court says state police must give more detailed descriptions and reasons for refusing to disclose their investigative records in the disappearance of Massachusetts college student Maura Murray.

The ruling came Wednesday, only a week after oral arguments. The justices sent the case back to a lower court for a new hearing.

State police "have not met their burden to demonstrate how disclosure of the requested documents could reasonably be expected to interfere with any investigation or enforcement proceedings," the court said in a unanimous decision.

Murray was 21 years old when she was last seen on the night of Feb. 9, 2004, shortly after crashing her car into a snowbank next to Route 112 in Haverhill.

Her father, Fred Murray, of Weymouth, Mass., sued to obtain the investigative files under the state Right-to-Know Law.

"We didn't get what we asked for yet," Murray said in a statement. "We were proven correct in our assessment that the state has not met its burden to show that the records should be withheld."

His lawyer, Timothy Ervin, said yesterday the ruling was "fair and balanced," although the court did not require the release of any records.

"We've said all along that the state has not met its burden to show that all the records they have fall within the exemption" to the Right-to-Know Law, he said. "In fairness, (the justices) couldn't order a release of records without knowing the nature of the records."

Fred Murray has said the information could aid private investigators trying to determine his daughter's fate. However, the volunteer private investigators disagreed.

"Even if the court decided that some or all of those records should be released, we don't want them," John Healy, a former state trooper who is coordinating the volunteer effort, said Wednesday. "We understand the damage it could do if certain investigative theories or avenues that led to dead ends were made public."

A superior court judge had agreed, ruling in favor of state police after he reviewed a list outlining 20 categories of records that were being withheld, such as "photographs," "correspondence," "maps and diagrams" and "tax records."

The high court said those categories were too vague for anyone to determine whether disclosure would compromise the police investigation or future criminal prosecution. They said the law clearly puts the burden on government agencies to justify withholding documents from public scrutiny.

"If the respondents continue to resist disclosure, they must make a presentation that will allow the superior court to determine how disclosure of the requested information could interfere with an ongoing investigation or enforcement proceedings," Associate Justice Richard Galway wrote for the court.

However, the ruling stopped well short of giving Fred Murray what he sought: either an index describing every record being withheld and the reason for keeping it confidential, so he could challenge the nondisclosure; or a requirement that a judge review the records and rule on each one.

The state Attorney General's Office had argued that would impose an overwhelming burden on police and the courts: The file in Murray's disappearance contains more than 2,500 records. Senior Assistant Attorney General Nancy Smith also argued the records, including witness interviews and police reports, could become critical evidence in a criminal prosecution.

Smith said yesterday that state police will be able to show their records should remain confidential.

On the Net: The ruling: http://www.courts.state.nh.us/supreme/opinions/2006/murra152.pdf
Title: Newspaper Articles #205
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:51:19 am
Foster's Online

December 27, 2006

Right-to-Know law gets tougher to circumvent

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has handed down an important ruling in the case of Frederick J. Murray v. N.H. Division of State Police, Special Investigation.

Its importance lies not just in the possibility it may help a distraught father find his missing daughter, but because the decision strengthens New Hampshire's Right-to-Know law.

The case involves attempts by Murray, a Weymouth, Mass., father, to access police records concerning his 23-year-old daughter, Maura, who went missing during the winter of 2004 in New Hampshire following a minor car accident.

With State Police failing to find his daughter, Murray has been seeking access to the records in hopes of being able to use them for an independent investigation.

However, the State Police, through the Attorney General's Office, has denied this request arguing the records are part of an ongoing investigation and, as such, are not subject to the state Right-to-Know law.

While the high court did not order the release of the records in its Dec. 20 ruling, it did reject the attorney general's blanket contention they be kept sealed, primarily because they were part of an ongoing investigation.

First of all, the court found there is no such blanket exemption under New Hampshire law. In fact, the court found such a void that it turned to federal law — the Freedom of Information Act — for guidance.

In doing so, the court took the position that the New Hampshire Right-to-Know law should be interpreted liberally.

"The purpose of the Right-to-Know Law is to ensure both the greatest possible public access to the actions, discussions and records of all public bodies, and their accountability to the people."

The court further noted: "While the statute does not provide for unrestricted access to public records, we resolve questions regarding the Right-to-Know Law with a view to providing the utmost information in order to best effectuate the statutory and constitutional objective of facilitating access to all public documents."

Moving to the federal Freedom of Information Act, the court found it was the state's responsibility to justify withholding investigative records — that a carte blanche denial of Murray's request was not appropriate.

Effectively, the court incorporated into state jurisprudence a six-part test provided for by the FOIA. These include the ability to withhold information that may hinder an investigation, deprive someone of a fair trial, invade someone's privacy, identify confidential sources, disclose certain investigative techniques or endanger someone's life or physical safety.

The court found while the Attorney General's Office might have grounds to withhold investigative records, it has not shown that releasing the records would "interfere" with that investigation or eventual prosecution.

"Put another way," wrote the court, "merely because a piece of paper has wended its way into an investigative dossier created in anticipation of enforcement action, an agency . . . cannot automatically disdain to disclose it."

The court went on to tell the Attorney General's Office that, "Since an agency may not rely on a blanket exemption, it must meet a minimum threshold of disclosure in order to justify its refusal to disclose."

That doesn't mean, however, the court is requiring the attorney general's staff to defend every page, paragraph or word.

"The agency is not required, however, to justify its refusal on a document-by-document basis. ... the withholding should be justified category-of-document by category-of-document not file-by-file."

In addition, Murray is not seeking a public review of all documents, rather each case involves an "in camera" review — one conducted in chambers by a judge out of the public purview.

The high court's decision sends the matter back to the trial court where the Attorney General's Office will be required to justify its decision to withhold documents. The decision will also give Fred Murray another chance to further the search for his daughter.

But perhaps more importantly, the court's decision reaffirms that New Hampshire's Right-to-Know law must be liberally interpreted, not liberally restricted — something that should be noted by county attorneys as well as local police departments across New Hampshire.
Title: Newspaper Articles #206
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:51:50 am
Concord Monitor

About January 2007

(INCOMPLETE?)

When 21-year-old Maura Murray disappeared from a mountain road in New Hampshire on a February night in 2004, her father believed from the start she was kidnapped.

Nearly three years later, just finding her body is the last hope Maura's father, Fred Murray, and his family still cling to, even if it means confirming she is dead.

"I want to make sure I do everything I can possibly do," Fred Murray said yesterday alongside Route 112, while dogs trained to find human remains searched for her nearby. "I don't want to leave any avenue unexplored. I owe it to my daughter."

Fred Murray and a half dozen family members gathered in Haverhill yesterday for yet another search of the area where the girl's empty car was found after the accident. Maura Murray was driving on Rt. 112 near the western edge of the White Mountains on Feb. 9, 2004, when she apparently lost control of her car and plowed into a snow bank. The junior nursing student from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst was never seen again.

Family members do not know where she was going or what happened, only that they don't believe she would ever run away without contacting anyone. They believe she was abducted and most likely killed. The police have searched the area repeatedly since then, but say they have no evidence of foul play. The case's status has never been upgraded from a missing persons search.
Title: Newspaper Articles #207
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:52:16 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

January 31, 2007

Warren death probed

By Lorna Colquhoun and Mark Hayward

Warren -- An elderly man who had cobbled together a network of helpful townspeople to make it through the winter was found dead in his home yesterday, a discovery that has shocked this town of 900 in the Baker River Valley.

"We are looking into a suspicious death up there," said Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeffery A. Strelzin yesterday. A prosecutor from his office was at the scene, but Strelzin would not discuss the matter further.

Albert J. Powell, 89, of Gould Hill Road, had lived in town for years, first as a summer resident and then full time, said his neighbor, who only wanted to be identified as Ms. Howard.

"He was a sweetheart, just very nice, very soft-spoken," said Howard, who took Powell on errands to the center of Warren or to Plymouth, about 20 miles away, when needed.

"He's a really sweet old guy," said another neighbor, Crystal Hancock.

Authorities said little about the matter yesterday, but state police troopers and members of the state police Major Crime Unit spent most of the day in town, parked at the town office building-fire station in the center of town.

Grafton County Sheriff Doug Dutile said the county dispatch center received a call about 9 p.m. Monday from Lakes Region Mutual Aid, which dispatches for the community. Dispatchers were sending an ambulance to the residence for an "unresponsive" elderly male.

Police Chief Warren Davis, who also responded, then called for state police.

Powell had lost two wives to cancer and lived alone on his property, a one-time farm that includes a handsome brick house, an attached barn and fields behind the house.

Townspeople at the Warren Village Market in the center of town last night recalled Powell as a delightful elderly man who was retired from the military. A longtime summer resident, he moved to Warren about 10 years ago from Gloucester, Mass., and had kept his property immaculate.

The home is within view of the intersection of Swain Hill and Gould Hill roads, a couple of miles off Route 25 from the center of town.

Powell had given up his driver's license this past summer and rebuffed an offer to spend the winter in New York state with his son, Howard said. Rather, he chose to rely on his friends and neighbors for assistance. Meals on Wheels made regular deliveries; Howard took him on errands; a man in town plowed his driveway.

The plowman found him dead, Howard said. He grew concerned when he telephoned Powell and his answering machine picked up; Powell stayed at home and always took his calls, Howard said.

Howard telephoned Powell on Sunday to see if he wanted to make the weekly garbage run. She, too, reached his answering machine, which she said seemed odd. When she later saw his lights on, she guessed that someone else took him.

Last night, a lone state police trooper sat in a cruiser in the driveway of the home and yellow caution tape was strung across the front yard. A light was on inside the house.

At Calamity Jane's restaurant, several people at the counter talked about the state police presence. For some, the police activity called to mind the September 2005 death of Thomas Conrad a short distance away in Pike. No arrest has been made in Conrad's death.

Also unresolved is the disappearance of Maura Murray on Feb. 9, 2004, not far away on Route 112 on the Bath/Haverhill line.

Meanwhile, police yesterday said nothing about what happened in Warren.

"What am I supposed to do tonight?" Howard asked. "Do I lock my doors and get my .38? How do we know we don't have a serial killer running around here?"
Title: Newspaper Articles #208
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:52:41 am
The Caledonian-Record

Friday, February 9, 2007

Notes: A variation appearing in an unknown publication italics

Mass. Woman Disappeared 3 Years Ago

No Lack Of Of Theories About Disappearance

Investigators Not Giving Up Search For Maura Murray

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL, NEW HAMPSHIRE - Three years since a Massachusetts college student disappeared after a car accident, theories abound as to what may have happened to her. It was three years ago today that Massachusetts college student Maura Murray disappeared in northern New Hampshire. There has been no sign of her since, but there also has been no lack of theories as to what happened to her.

It was reported three years ago, on Feb. 9, 2004, that Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass., then 21 years old, lost control of her black 1996 Saturn on a curve on Route 112 near the Weathered Barn and crashed into a stand of trees. It was February 9, 2004, that word came that Murray of Hanson, Massachusetts, lost control of her car on Route 112 in Haverhill and crashed into trees. A resident said Murray declined his offer of help, and when he returned, she was gone.

John Healy, who is a member of the team of investigators working on the Murray case in concert with the Molly Bish Foundation, said the team has come up with other theories about what happened that dark February night. John Healy, a private investigator, said a team of investigators working with the family isn't ruling out that scenario, but they also have other theories. For instance, he said he and other investigators believe the woman the neighbor saw may not have been Murray and that the accident scene may have been staged.

Healy said although police have said Murray crashed her car into the trees, he and the other investigators do not believe it to be true.

He said, based on the damage to the Saturn, that it appears as if the car was traveling at a slow speed when it may have struck the underside of another vehicle; the actual crash site may have taken place somewhere else. Not only that, they believe Murray may not have been the young woman then-First Student school bus driver Butch Atwood saw. They believe the scene where the Saturn was found by Atwood may have been staged.

This does not mean investigators have absolutely ruled out that Murray was at the Route 112 site and simply fled. And they are not ruling out that she may have have committed suicide, or was abducted and killed.

It was originally thought that Atwood came upon Murray's Saturn when he was returning home aboard his bus after taking students on a ski trip.

Atwood said he offered to help Murray, a University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student, but she refused his assistance, saying she had already called AAA.

Atwood said he drove to his nearby home, parked his school bus and went into his house to phone police and emergency workers. It was the last anyone saw of her.

Healy is hoping someone will come forward with information about what really happened that Monday night, Feb. 9, 2004.

"Someone up there must know something," he said. "We are talking to several people and following up on leads that have not been done by state police."

Healy and the others of the investigative team are coming back in the spring with dog teams to follow up on some information they gleaned from their two-day search with dog teams in October.

Regarding Atwood, Healy said he tracked him down to Homossa, Fla., where he is living in a "nice" home and has a 19-foot boat. Healy said Atwood would not talk to him about what he may have seen that February night.

Maura Murray Web Site

Helena Murray, who is related to Maura and runs a Web site (Home) dedicated to Maura and finding out what happened to her, cannot believe it is three years later and family and friends are no closer today to learning what happened to Maura than they were right after she disappeared.

"I don't think we can rule out anything until we learn something," Murray said. "Do I think Maura took off over that mountain (Mount Kancanmagus)? No I don't."

She said a lot has happened during the time Maura has been missing. Maura's sister, Kathleen, got married and Maura's boyfriend and unofficial fiance, Billy Rausch of Fort Sill, Okla., was promoted to captain and sent to Iraq.

Also during those three years, the New Hampshire State Police Major Crimes unit has reportedly been working on Maura's case. However, the unit and the state's Attorney General's Office are fighting Maura's father, Fred, in court about having any of the records released, including the accident report.

While he may believe police are not doing anything to find his daughter, Murray has not stopped making the trek north to New Hampshire on the weekends to look for her.

What has really frustrated Fred Murray is that he says he has turned over potential evidence to state police with nothing resulting.

One example is that a man came forward and told him that the man's relative may have been involved. The man also turned over a possible weapon.

Murray drove to state police headquarters in Concord, N.H., to turn it over to state police, but he said they refused to accept it. So, he mailed the potential evidence to them and said he has not received any response or acknowledgement.

From the time Murray first talked to the media in Bethlehem, N.H., just a couple days after his daughter's disappearance, he definitely believed something had gone very wrong.

"I had an uneasy feeling at that time some local dirt bag grabbed her," he said Thursday night. "She was supposed to call me. That is what gave me the uneasy feeling. She always called when she said she would. I am still struggling to find out what everyone saw that night."

Anyone with information about the Maura Murray case should contact the New Hampshire State Police Major Crimes Unit at 603-271-2520.
Title: Newspaper Articles #209
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:53:14 am
North Country News

February 9, 2007

(INCOMPLETE?)

Another Year Has Gone By

February 9, 2004 was the date that Maura Murray went missing in the area of Route 112 in Haverhill, NH.

It has now been 3 long years since her disappearance, with still so many unanswered questions surrounding the bizarre case.

Maura, who was 21 when she disappeared, would be 25 years old this coming May 4th.

opportunity to be married, have children? Would her children have had her eye color or hair color? Questions unfortunately we or her family for granted in our daily lives.

may never know and it’s certainly sad and upsetting that someone may have possibly taken all those opportunities away that most of us take for granted in our daily lives.

Although it is stated that the entire incident is still under investigation by authorities, nothing new has developed concerning the case. There have been searches, private detectives, psychics and many volunteers who have continued looking into the case - but still no answers as of yet.

Both F&E hope that on this 3rd Anniversary of Maura’s disappearance, something will soon come about that will lead investigators, volunteers, friends and family - a bit closer to being able to close the chapters in this book and give closure to this on-going story.

It has been stated by family, friends and volunteers that more searches are expected to take place this coming season.

As always, Frank & Earnest will be back next issue - maybe!

Signed,

Frank & Earnest
Title: Newspaper Articles #210
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:53:40 am
Boston Globe

April 26, 2007

People

By Wendy Kileen

WHO'S WHAT WHERE: Carolanne Cavalieri of Marketing & PR Solutions in Marblehead, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary, has added sleuthing to her pursuits. She recently received a certificate in professional investigation from Boston University. She also joined volunteers and private investigators in a missing person search for Maura Murray in Haverhill, N.H., and attended a two-day seminar given by the Licensed Professional Detective Association of Massachusetts.

Send people items to wdkilleen@comcast.net. Photos, as jpg attachments, may be sent to globenorth@globe.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #211
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:54:45 am
Whitman & Hanson Express

July 3, 2007

Did Maura make the mysterious phone call?

Did Maura make the mysterious phone call?While a search was beginning in Woodsville N.H., Billy Rausch was walking through security in a Dallas airport. He had just shut off his phone when he received a voice message.

Sharon Rausch, Billy's mother, described the message: "It was very short -- consisted of a shivering, soft whimpering sound with labored breathing as if someone was very cold."

The number traced back to an AT&T calling card. Coincidentally, Sharon said she had bought two AT&T calling cards for Maura the previous Thanksgiving holiday. After an investigation, N. H. State Police traced the calling card to the American Red Cross.

Sharon had called the Red Cross sometime between Tuesday night and early Wednesday morning to request an emergency leave for Billy, but she doubts the mysterious call could have come from the Red Cross.

"I will say with a certainty that contrary to N.H. State Police info, the call could not be traced," Sharon later told a reporter for this series. Private investigators and local law enforcement in Ohio later tried to track the call, but without the card number and PIN, it was not traceable, Sharon said.

"It just doesn't make any sense that the call was from the Red Cross because if they had been trying to call Billy, they never called back." The "soft crying, sniffing and muffled sobs" didn't seem to make sense coming from the Red Cross, she said.

Billy had been having problems with his phone where callers were sometimes sent to voicemail without realizing it, which could explain why a message was left and no one spoke, Sharon said.

After police determined the call was from Red Cross officials they considered the case closed on the phone call.

During the search on Wednesday, a K-9 unit trailed Maura's scent 100 yards eastbound from where her car was found.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:55:27 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Original PDF: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ejETr3jonYx-f7TsNZTKHTGCThT0z77T/view?usp=sharing

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Part I: The Departure

Maura was a cross country star during her days at Whitman-Hanson High School. "Quiet, shy, but fierce on the track," is how fellow Umass track team member Nastran Shams describes her.

In the winter of 2004, 21-year-old Maura Murray of Hanson, a talented athlete and nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, got into to her car, drove to the woods of northern New Hampshire and disappeared. Not a trace of her has been found since despite an intensive search and investigation. What happened to Maura Murray? How, after her car skidded into a snow bank on a mild winter night, could she simply disappear? In a multipart report, the Express examined the circumstances surrounding Maura's disappearance and traces her steps from Amherst, Mass., to Woodsville, N.H. The story begins in a UMass dormitory...

Thursday, Feb. 5, 2004 -- It was an overcast night at the University of Massachusetts Amherst campus. Maura Murray, a junior nursing major and dean's list student, was working the campus security desk at the Melville dormitory. Her job was to check identification as students entered the dorm.

Maura's shoulder-length brown hair was likely pulled back tightly in a bun as it nearly always was. Friends knew Maura as a highly-motivated achiever who could be shy at times but was also a free-spirit. She ran on the college track team and was an excellent athlete who broke her high school record in the two-mile run.

During a slow point in her shift, around 10:20 p.m., Maura chatted on the phone with her older sister, Kathleen. The two were discussing men troubles, specifically Kathleen's tiff with her then fiancé, now husband, Tim Carpenter. The two sisters talked nearly every day and this conversation was not unlike any other, Kathleen would later say. Maura was especially close to Kathleen and her other older sister, Julie. She also had two brothers, Freddy and Kurt.

Maura did not burst into tears right after hanging up the phone, contrary to some published reports. But she did start crying about three hours later for reasons that remain unclear. Maura was comforted by her work supervisor, Karen Mayotte, who walked her back to her single room in the Kennedy dormitory around 1:20 a.m. Maura never told Mayotte why she was upset. Supervisors are on a 30-minute rotation so Mayotte would not have been present for Maura's entire shift.

Whatever was bothering Maura, she did not share it with her friends or father who visited her at UMass on Saturday, Feb. 7, less than 48 hours later.

Growing up, Maura had lived with her mother in Hanson, but she retained an especially close relationship with her father, Fred Murray.

Maura lived in the high-rise Kennedy Dorm and worked campus security in Melville dormitory, both in the southwest area of UMass-Amherst.

When Fred wasn't coaching her in youth sports or attending one of her track meets, he and Maura would go camping or hiking, usually in the mountains of New Hampshire. Fred came to UMass that weekend to help Maura go car shopping. Maura's black 1996 Saturn sedan was in rough shape, running on just three cylinders. Maura drove the Saturn as little as possible. The father and daughter were looking at a three-year-old Geo Prizm. "She would have had a new car by next week," Fred said later.

After a day of car shopping on Saturday, the two had dinner at the Amherst Brewing Company on North Pleasant Street in downtown Amherst. Each time Fred visited Maura their routine included trying another of the many local brew pubs in the area.

Maura's friend Kate Markopoulos joined them at the restaurant later that night. After dinner and drinks, Maura's father was ready to head back to the Quality Inn, a motel on Russell St. in neighboring Hadley. Fred offered Maura his new Toyota Corolla to drive for the evening. Maura dropped her father off at the motel and returned with her friend to UMass.

Back on campus, Maura attended a small party in the dorm with Kate and their friends. The girls were chatting and drinking Skyy Blue malt mixed with wine, friend Sara Alfieri later said in an interview with Seventeen magazine. At some point Maura mentioned that she wanted to return the car to her father that night, which didn't make sense to Kate since it was so late, Maura had been drinking and her father wasn't expecting the car until the next day, the magazine reported.

Around 2:30 a.m. Maura told friends she was heading home to her dorm room. Instead she got into her father's car and drove toward his motel. While driving along Route 9 in Hadley, Maura slammed into a guardrail causing about $8,000 worth of damage to the Toyota. Local police responded to the scene of the accident but no charges were filed.

Maura got a ride back to her father's motel. When Fred Murray learned of the accident, Maura was shaken up and extremely apologetic. "She was upset, but it was okay," Fred recalled. "If this is the only trouble a kid ever causes, then you're pretty lucky as a parent."

At 4:49 on Sunday morning a little while after the accident Maura called her boyfriend, Billy Rausch, on her father's cell phone. Billy consoled her over the phone, though he would later say he thought there was more than just the accident on Maura's mind.

Billy was an army lieutenant who was stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Just a few weeks earlier Maura had arranged for a summer job at a hospital in Oklahoma to be closer to Billy. "They would have ended up married," said Fred. Later, Billy would tell a local newspaper that he and Maura were "engaged to be engaged."

The couple met while studying at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and began dating in the fall of 2001. After three semesters, Maura transferred to UMass to continue her studies. "Military just wasn't for her," said Andrea Connolly, a high school friend who ran on the track team with Maura.

Billy and Maura remained close after her transfer, traveling between their schools to spend time together.

After a few calls Sunday morning, Feb. 8, it appeared Fred's insurance would cover the accident and it was time to "move on." Fred had a work obligation in Bridgeport, Connecticut so he rented a car and dropped Maura off at her UMass dorm. That evening at 11:30 p.m. Fred talked to Maura on the phone and reminded her to pick up accident forms from the Registry of Motor Vehicles. Maura agreed to call her dad on the phone the next night (Monday) at 8 to go over the forms and fill out the insurance information.

The next day, Monday, Feb. 9, Maura made a number of phone calls.

Just before 1 p.m. she called Dominic and Linda Salamone, a couple who own a rental condominium at the Seasons at Attitash Resort in Bartlett, New Hampshire. Maura's family, which frequented the Bartlett area, had stayed at the Seasons, though never at this condominium.

The Salamones don't remember the conversation with Maura but they are certain she did not book their condominium. To do so on such short notice would have been impossible, explained Linda Salamone. "We don't operate like a hotel." Rentals must be booked far in advance in order for the Salamones to drop a key in the mail.

The call to the Salamones lasted about three minutes, records show. Linda Salamone speculates she might have offered Maura recommendations on other places to stay, though her memory was foggy by the time police finally interviewed her - nearly a year after Maura went missing.

Maura called a fellow nursing student at 1:13 p.m., though the purpose for her call is not clear. According to John Healey, a New Hampshire private investigator who is familiar with the case, Maura may have arranged to give her scrubs to a fellow nursing student. Family member Helena Murray maintains that Maura, always conscientious, was merely returning scrubs she borrowed from another student.

At 2:05 p.m. Maura made a five-minute call to 1-800-GOSTOWE, where hotel bookings can be made. The "Go Stowe" system was actually out of order at this time so Maura could not have made a reservation and could only listen to voice recordings.

Also on Monday, Maura sent an email to her boyfriend, Billy Rausch. Maura's email to Billy that day read: "I love you more stud I got your messages, but honestly, i didn't feel like talking to much of anyone, i promise to call today though" The message was signed "love you, maura."

At 2:18 p.m. Maura called Billy on his cell phone and left a brief voicemail message. She said something along the lines of "I love you, I miss you, I want to talk," according to Billy's mother, Sharon Rausch. The cell phone Maura used was a gift from Billy, but Sharon's name was on the account.

Billy would later be shipped out to Iraq.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:56:05 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(2 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

A police investigation later revealed that Maura also emailed teachers at the UMass Nursing School and her boss at a local art gallery to let them know she would be out of town for several days due to a death in the family. There was no death according to Maura's family.

Maura's friends don't know why she made up the death-in-the-family story. "There was something she wanted to get away and think about," said long-time friend Liz Drewniak. "Maybe she just wanted to get away. She was probably under a lot of pressure."

There is further evidence suggesting that Maura had intended to leave campus for at least a few days. Maura had "fastidiously packed all her belongings into boxes before she left school, even removing the art from her dorm room walls," the Boston Globe reported, citing UMass Police Lieutenant Robert Thrasher.

"It looked like she was planning to leave school," said Lieutenant John Scarinza of the New Hampshire State Police.

Although police and some friends suggest from her packing that Maura may have been intending to leave school permanently, there is reason to doubt such a conclusion.

Maura met her boyfriend, Billy Rausch, in the fall of 2001 while attending West Point. Maura was following in her sister Julie’s footsteps, but later decided military life wasn’t for her and transferred to UMass. Despite the distance Maura and Billy remained close.

Maura had recently returned from winter break. The University of Massachusetts has an unusually long break running from before Christmas into late January. Maura returned home to Hanson during her break and logically would have packed her belongings for such an extended time away. The UMass calendar refers to a "Welcome Back Week," occurring over the last week of January and into the first week in February. It is therefore plausible that Maura had been back on campus less than 10 days.

Family members also point out that Maura was a "neat-freak" by nature, so it wouldn't be unusual for the former West Point cadet to have her belongings carefully packed and arranged.

Moreover, there is no indication that Maura was doing poorly in school. To the contrary, she had made the dean's list the prior semester and was known as a good student.

Before leaving the UMass campus on Monday, Maura packed some clothing and toiletries, including a toothbrush and floss. Maura was especially conscientious with her dental hygiene, according to her mother Laurie Murray; she would never go long without brushing and flossing. She also brought along her birth control, according to private detective John Smith.

Maura must have packed her college textbooks as well since they were later found in her car. Maura had been getting rides from friends at school due to her car problems, says Sharon Rausch, so it is unlikely the textbooks would have already been in the car.

Maura also packed a cell phone charger and a Samsung travel adapter for her cell phone.

Finally, Maura grabbed her favorite stuffed animal, a monkey her father had given her, and a diamond necklace from Billy.

Sometime around 3:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 9, Maura left her dorm and got into her Saturn.

At 3:40 p.m. she withdrew $280 from a nearby ATM, leaving her account almost empty. Maura was due to be paid soon from her two part-time jobs.

Maura then stopped off at a local liquor store and bought about $40 worth of alcohol: Bailey's, Kahlua, vodka and a box of wine according to her sister Kathleen. Police later found a liquor store receipt in Maura's car. A police review of surveillance footage showed Maura was alone at both the ATM and the liquor store.

At 4:37 p.m. Maura checked her voicemail for messages. This was the last recorded call on her cell phone.

As she promised her father, Maura obtained accident forms before leaving town; the forms were later found in her vehicle. Maura may have stopped at the Registry of Motor Vehicles on Route 9 in neighboring Hadley or she could have downloaded them from the Registry website.

Maura Murray then hit the road, heading north toward the New Hampshire wilderness. She never returned.

Part II: The Accident

Nestled in the Connecticut River Valley, a stone's throw from the Vermont border, Woodsville is a rural village within the town of Haverhill, New Hampshire. Woodsville has a year-round population of 1,080 and was best known as the home of America's oldest covered bridge -- until the night of Mon. Feb. 9, 2004.

Sometime after 7 that evening, 21-year-old Maura Murray found herself in a snow bank off Wild Ammonoosuc Road in Woodsville. How and why she arrived at that point, and what happened next is the source of great mystery, conjecture and heartache.

Wild Ammonoosuc Road, also known as Route 112, winds along the northern end of Woodsville near the town line with Bath, New Hampshire. The road is named for the nearby Wild Ammonoosuc River, which starts in the White Mountains and snakes west for about 15 miles, eventually flowing into the Connecticut River.

Little is known about Maura's trip north after she left the UMass campus in Amherst, Mass around 4 p.m. Presumably she drove Route 116 out of Amherst, picked up U.S. Route 91 North in South Deerfield, Mass. and headed toward New Hampshire. Considering that Maura landed on Route 112 in Woodsville, she likely took exit 17 off of Route 91 to reach Route 302.

In winter, local travelers know to take Route 302 if headed to Bartlett, N.H. instead of the faster, but snakelike Route 112, which later turns into the Kancamagus Highway. The entire journey from Amherst would have taken Maura 2 1/2 to 3 hours.

Maura was presumably headed to the town of Bartlett, a family favorite vacation spot and home of Attiash ski resort in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Maura continued to visit the White Mountains with her father into her college years and even brought along her boyfriend, Billy, on a family trip several months before her fateful journey.

There was snow on the ground, but it was a mild February evening in Woodsville.

It had been quite cold earlier in the day, but by 2 p.m. a warming trend drove the temperatures above freezing and they hovered around 33 degrees Fahrenheit for most of the night. (Later reports would erroneously state the high temperature at 12 degrees.)
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 3
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:56:35 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Part I: The Departure

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(3 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Shortly after 7 p.m. Faith Westman heard a loud thump outside her white gambrel-style home at 70 Wild Ammonoosuc Road. Her house is located inside a sharp left-hand bend in the road; Westman lives there with her husband, Tim. The couple also owns The Weathered Barn, a well-known local landmark, which is across the street at 69 Wild Ammonoosuc Road. In this barn, Tim Westman, a renowned craftsman, restores antique musical instruments.

Faith Westman peered out her window and saw Maura Murray's black Saturn lodged in a snow bank a short distance from her home. The car was facing west on the eastbound side of the road. From the look of things, it was clear there had been some kind of accident.

At 7:27 p.m. Westman called the Grafton County Sheriff's Department to report the vehicle, which she described as being in a "ditch."

Westman told dispatcher Ronda Marsh she was not sure if there were any injuries. Notably, the log reports that Westman said she could "see a man in the vehicle smoking a cigarette."

Maura never smoked and was vehemently anti-smoking, according to her mother and father.

In a later interview with Maura's father, Fred Murray, the Westmans could not agree on an exact description of the person in the black Saturn. Faith Westman believed she had seen a man with a cigarette, while Tim Westman believed it was a woman at the scene on her cell phone and that the red light from the phone looked like the tip of a cigarette.

An investigator who later interviewed the Westmans confirmed that the couple did not fully agree on a description.

When asked to clarify for this story the Westmans declined comment. "We've been down that path too many times. It's worn thin," Tim Westman said.

Meanwhile, across the street, neighbor Virginia Marrotte was standing in her kitchen with her husband, John, who was peeling an orange.

"From our kitchen window we saw a car down the road with trouble lights flashing and someone walking around the car," Virginia Marrotte wrote in response to a set of questions sent for this series.

John Marrotte told the same story to private investigator John Healy after the incident and added that he believed he saw Maura's car back up parallel to the road, indicated by the car's rear lights.

While the Marrottes were watching from their kitchen window they observed another neighbor arrive on the scene in a school bus.

Arthur "Butch" Atwood is a former Taunton, Mass., resident, who worked as a school bus driver for First Student Inc., the second largest school bus operator in the U.S. according to the company website.

Atwood lived with his wife, Barbara, in a log-cabin style home 210 yards east of the Westmans at 4 Wild Ammonoosuc Road. Atwood was on his way home after dropping off students following a ski field trip. His home is on the town line with neighboring Bath.

Atwood stopped by the scene of the accident and saw a young woman alone in the car whom he later identified as Maura Murray. Her dark hair was hanging down, not in its customary bun, though Atwood said he could clearly see her face. She was "shook-up," but not injured, he reported to police.

"I saw no blood...She was cold and she was shivering," Atwood told the Caledonian Record.

Maura struggled to get out of her Saturn because the car door was hitting against a snowbank, Atwood recalled when interviewed for this story from his new home in Florida. There was as much as two and a half feet of snow on the ground in the area.

Atwood stepped out of his bus and asked Maura if she wanted him to call the police. Maura told him not to bother, saying that she had already called AAA, Atwood said.

A N.H. State Police "synopsis" released by Lt. John Scarinza four months later, painted a different view of their encounter: "When the passerby stated that he was going to call local law enforcement to come assist, Maura pleaded with him not to call police."

Atwood said that Maura remained on the driver's side of her car, about 15 to 20 feet away and stayed there during their entire conversation. A heavy-set man about 60 years old, Atwood may have cast an intimidating figure to Maura. "I might be afraid if I saw Butch. He's 350 pounds and has this mustache," Barbara Atwood told the Patriot Ledger two weeks after the accident.

Atwood offered to let Maura wait at his house until help arrived, but Maura wanted to wait with her car. He advised Maura to turn her car's lights on to avoid getting hit by vehicles coming around the bend. Atwood then left the scene and drove the 100 yards to his home.

Atwood doubted that Maura could have reached AAA due to the sparse cell phone coverage in the area. "I knew better," he said later. Family friend Sharon Rausch also confirmed that AAA did not receive a call from Maura that night.

Based on his recollection and the times reported in police dispatch logs, Atwood's conversation with Maura could only have lasted a few minutes.

After Atwood drove away, Faith Westman noticed the Saturn's interior lights switch on and off and witnessed a flurry of activity at the rear of the car, including a person standing at the trunk, according to private investigator John Smith, who spoke with the Westmans after the accident.

Smith is one of several retired police officers who have been working on a volunteer basis with the New Hampshire League of Investigators.

Meanwhile Butch Atwood backed his school bus into his driveway and went inside to call the police. He had difficulty reaching the 911 operator due to busy phone circuits. Atwood eventually got through to the Hanover Regional Dispatch Center, which in turn alerted the Grafton County Sheriff's department at 7:43 p.m., 16 minutes after Faith Westman's original call.

Atwood spoke to the 911 operator from the front porch of his house. He could see the road, but Maura's car was not in his line of sight. As he spoke, a few cars passed by but Atwood was not able to identify any of them.

"I did not hear or see anything strange happen," Atwood said.

Three minutes later, at 7:46 p.m., Haverhill police Sergeant Cecil Smith arrived on the scene. He had been dispatched at 7:29 p.m. following the call from Faith Westman.

Atwood saw that a police vehicle had arrived so he went to his school bus to finish up some paperwork, he said during an interview.

Atwood later estimated that seven to nine minutes had elapsed from the time he left Maura to the arrival of the police cruiser, the Caledonian Record reported.

"Evidence at the scene indicated the vehicle had been eastbound and had gone off the roadway, struck some trees, spun around, and come to rest facing the wrong way in the eastbound lane," according to the accident report filed by Sgt. Smith on February 15, six days after the accident.

Sgt. Smith approached Maura's car and discovered that it was locked. There was no sign of Maura. The driver's side windshield was cracked and both front air bags had been deployed.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 4
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:57:11 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(4 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

In a window of just minutes Maura Murray had vanished.

Tire impressions were found in the snow, though none were reported on the road.

Sgt. Smith found a box of Franzia wine behind the driver's seat of the vehicle and a red liquid on the driver's side door and ceiling of the car. (Maura's high-school friend Liz Drewniak recalls that Maura was not a heavy drinker, but often liked to buy wine by the box.) The box was damaged, perhaps in the accident, and reddish spots resembling wine were also found on the road, according to investigator John Healy. Sgt. Smith later recovered a coke bottle that contained "a red liquid with a strong alcoholic odor." None of the other bottles of alcohol that Maura had bought in Amherst were found in the car.

While later reports would suggest that a witness observed Maura intoxicated at the time of the accident, the source of that information is unclear. Circumstantial evidence suggests Maura may have been drinking wine prior to the crash, but Butch Atwood confirmed to a reporter for this story that Maura did not appear intoxicated when he spoke with her.

Other items found in Maura's car were a AAA card, insurance forms, gloves, compact discs, makeup, computer generated directions for Burlington and Stowe, Vermont, and a book Maura had been reading by Nicholas Howe, Not Without Peril.

Sgt. Smith also found a rag stuffed into the exterior tail pipe of Maura's Saturn. The rag came from the trunk of Maura's car, according to Fred Murray, who said he had stored the rag along with an emergency roadside kit in the Saturn.

Whether Maura stuffed the rag in the tailpipe herself and what her motivation could have been remains unclear.

Stuffing a rag into a tail pipe would stall the vehicle and it would eventually kill the engine, according to Ferry's Automotive in Hanson. Plugging the tailpipe can also be a way to check for leaks in a vehicle's exhaust system. While carbon monoxide poisoning is a common method of attempting suicide, it would normally require a means of feeding the deadly gas back into the vehicle, such as by hose or in a confined space.

When asked if Maura could have put the rag in the tailpipe, her father said it was possible. If smoke was trailing out of the tailpipe, Maura may have wanted to plug the pipe to avoid attracting attention from police.

After checking the area around the Saturn, Sgt. Smith knocked on the Westmans door and asked the couple what they had seen.

Sgt. Smith then drove the 200 yards east to Butch Atwood's home, and found Atwood sitting in his bus. Sgt. Smith knocked on the bus window. "He asked where the girl was," Atwood recalled and told the officer he hadn't seen anyone since leaving Maura's vehicle.

At 7:56 p.m, 10 minutes after Sgt. Smith arrived, EMS arrived on the scene followed by a fire truck one minute later.

New Hampshire State Trooper John Monahan also stopped by the scene of the accident. It is not clear what time he arrived, if he was dispatched to the accident, or if he stopped on his own accord.

Monahan, who is now assigned to the Registry of Motor Vehicles, did not respond to several requests for clarification. Assistant Attorney General Jeff Strelzin, who is now handling documents for the case, said he was not sure he could provide specifics, but would look into the matter. No further information was available at press time.

Sgt. Smith and Atwood both drove the area searching for Maura. Atwood drove in a loop from Mountain Lakes, a nearby recreational and residential area, to the Swiftwater Stage Stop General Store.

"I took a ride around the back roads. I was gone about 15 minutes. Then I took a ride to French Pond," Atwood told the Caledonian Record.

Sgt. Smith was believed to have driven westbound on Route 112, according to Fred Murray, who said that no search was done eastbound on Route 112.

At 8:02 p.m. EMS had cleared the scene and at 8:49 p.m. the fire crew had also left. Maura's car was towed ten miles to Lavoie's Auto Care Center on Route 10 in Haverhill. At 9:27 p.m. Sgt. Smith was dispatched to another call on Lime Kiln Road in North Haverhill -- a suicidal teenager in danger of electrocuting himself.

The night wore on but temperatures did not dip below 25 degrees.

At noon the next day. Tuesday, Feb. 10, police issued a "BOL" (Be on the Lookout) for Maura Murray. She was described as wearing a dark coat, with black hair hanging past her shoulders, standing five feet, three inches tall, and weighing 120 pounds. A subsequent report from Haverhill Police stated that Maura was last seen wearing jeans and corrected her height to be about five feet, seven inches tall, with brown shoulder length hair and blue eyes. Maura's cell phone was also missing from the scene and police reported she left with a black backpack.

At 3:20 p.m. on Tuesday, Fred Murray got a voicemail on his home phone telling him his car had been abandoned in Woodsville, New Hampshire. Fred was at a contract job in another state and did not receive that message until much later. At 5 p.m. Fred received a cell phone call from his daughter Kathleen; Maura's car had been abandoned and she was missing, Kathleen told her father.

Shortly after talking to Kathleen, Fred Murray called the Haverhill Police and insisted they immediately start searching for his daughter. Police told Fred that New Hampshire Fish and Game Service could start a search Wednesday if Maura was not yet found.

On Tuesday, February 10 at 5:17 p.m. Maura was first referred to as "missing" by the Haverhill Police.

Twelve hours later the formal search for Maura Murray began.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 5
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:57:57 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(5 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Part III: The Search

The Wells River Motel is a modest, cozy refuge that sits on the Vermont side of the Connecticut River just across from New Hampshire. The motel offers 11 rooms, each with its own theme, including a teddy bear room outfitted with teddy bears on the beds.

As of Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2004, the Wells River Motel became the unofficial headquarters in the search for Maura Murray. Just 36 hours earlier Maura's car had been found abandoned along Route 112, eight miles away in neighboring Woodsville, N.H.

Caption: Haverhill, N.H. Police Chief Jeff Williams displays Maura's missing person poster. Photo Courtesy Littleton Courier.

Maura's father, Fred Murray, was the first to arrive. Fred is an intense, energetic man in his 60s with a wiry frame, graying hair and a passion for the outdoors. He knows the White Mountains intimately and often hiked and camped in the area with Maura, the youngest of his three daughters.

Fred had visited Maura the prior weekend at school in Amherst, Mass. Following a two-day visit and some car shopping with Maura, Fred departed on Sunday to Bridgeport, Connecticut for a contract job at a local hospital where he worked as a medical technician. This was the last time Fred ever saw his daughter.

It was around 5 p.m. on Tuesday that Fred first heard of Maura's disappearance. After several frantic phone calls to Haverhill police, he hit the road in the wee hours of Wednesday morning and arrived at the Haverhill, N.H., police station just before dawn.

As police arranged a formal search party, Fred headed to Wild Ammonoosuc Road (Rt. 112), a rural, twisting route that hugs the Wild Ammonoosuc River and later turns into the Kancamagus Highway. Maura's Saturn had been found just past a sharp elbow in a heavily-wooded section of the road.

Fred combed the snow-covered area lining the street; no snow had fallen since Maura disappeared and that made the search for footprints less difficult. Her car had already been towed away but Fred scoured the scene looking for any clues his daughter may have left behind. There was no sign of Maura.

"You find footsteps; you're following them, but you're afraid to look down because it might be your daughter," Fred later recalled.

That same Wednesday morning 1,800 miles away, Maura's boyfriend, Army 2nd Lt. Billy Rausch, headed to the Dallas Fort-Worth Airport to catch a flight north. Once he heard that Maura was missing Billy requested a leave of absence from his unit at Fort Sill in Lawton, Oklahoma, to join the search in New Hampshire.

Before walking through airport security Billy shut off his cell phone. Shortly after, a mysterious call came in that would later be a source of dispute.

Family members began to arrive in Woodsville, including Maura's sister Kathleen and her brothers Freddy and Kurtis. Maura's sister Julie was stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina and flew up a few days later.

The group had few clues to go on. Maura's siblings drove Eastbound on Route 112, to North Woodstock and Lincoln, then across the Kancamagus Highway to Bartlett and Conway -- tourist towns the family knew well from years of summer vacations. They checked motels and asked if anyone had seen Maura; no one had. They handed out flyers and posted them at bus stops, gas stations and police stations.

Meanwhile on Wild Ammonoosuc Road, members of New Hampshire Fish and Game arrived on the scene in a helicopter while Haverhill Police, New Hampshire State Police and a K-9 team gathered on the ground. This was the first time the area had been searched since Monday evening.

A search dog sniffed the area trying to track Maura's scent while a Fish and Game pilot flew just above the treetops, scanning the forest for footprints; snow had accumulated to about two and a half feet in depth by the first week in February. No exact times were reported, though the search must have occurred before the sun set at 5:12 p.m. that day.

Back in Hanson, Mass., at the family's white split-level home, Laurie Murray was living "a mother's worst nightmare." She had first learned of Maura's disappearance Tuesday afternoon when Haverhill, N.H. police called the house looking for the owner of an abandoned Saturn. A fractured ankle kept Laurie from joining her family in New Hampshire. Instead, she remained in the home where she raised Maura and her four siblings, sat by the phone and waited helplessly for any news of her daughter.

There was little good news to report that day. Fred Murray and the rest of the family came up empty in their search along the Kancamagus Highway. The New Hampshire Fish and Game's helicopter search turned up only deer and moose tracks.

"It's like looking for a needle in a haystack," said Kathleen.

Caption: Though it clearly pained him to talk about Maura’s disappearance, Fred welcomed the growing media attention the case generated, believing it to be a key in bringing his daughter home.

Wednesday's efforts did produce one significant lead. The lone search dog on the scene was given a black leather glove from Maura's car to sniff. Though the dog did not get any hits in the adjacent wooded area or from nearby homes, the dog did track Maura's scent near the intersection of Bradley Hill Road 100 yards eastbound from where her car was found.

There are several homes in that area of the road, which is just yards from the Bath town line. On the even side of Wild Ammonoosuc Road is the home of Arthur "Butch" Atwood, the bus driver who said he stopped and offered Maura help that Monday evening. Across the street at 1 Wild Ammonoosuc Road is the home of Rick Forcier, a 45-year-old local contractor, who was living in a trailer on his property while his home was being built. Also within view is the property of Virginia and John Marrotte who live adjacent to Rick Forcier.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 6
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:58:33 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(6 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

The abrupt loss of Maura's scent in the middle of the road prompted officials to speculate that Maura got into a passing vehicle. Whether she did so voluntarily or was forced remains open to question.

As the day's search drew to a close, police spoke with the Murray and Rausch families.

Billy Rausch had arrived in Woodsville earlier Wednesday and met up with his parents, Bill and Sharon, who travelled from their home in Marengo, Ohio.

Around 5 p.m. Wednesday the Rausch family arrived at the Haverhill Police Department, located on Route 10, about nine miles from the scene of Maura's accident. "Billy was extensively interrogated in private, and then Bill and I were questioned in the room with Billy," Sharon Rausch later recounted.

Fred Murray was asked if his daughter had recently experienced any traumatic events. He could only think back to Amherst when Maura banged up his new car. But in Fred's words, "It wasn't a big deal."

At a meeting that night, Haverhill Police speculated that Maura was suicidal or had planned to run away. There was no evidence of foul play or that Maura had wandered into the woods, Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams said. He also explained that Maura, at age of 21, was within her legal rights to not want to be found.

Sharon Rausch did not share that opinion. "I cannot believe," she said, "that there would be any problem in her life that would cause her to run away from three close groups of people in her life; her family, Billy and his family and the very close knit group of Hanson high school girl friends."

Exhausted and defeated, the search party returned to the Wells River Motel for the night.

By the next day, Thursday, Feb. 12, police had issued a press release stating Maura may be enroute to the Kancamagus Highway area and was "listed as endangered and possibly suicidal."

The press release also stated that "witnesses at the scene reported seeing a lone female with no apparent injuries who appeared impaired due to alcohol consumption." It still remains unclear who the witnesses were that said Maura appeared to be intoxicated. The release was not dated, but a time stamp shows it was faxed to the Hanson, Mass. police department at 3:05 p.m. Thursday.

On the UMass Amherst campus, another search was underway at Maura's dorm room. Investigators found her belongings packed in boxes and a search of her computer showed she had downloaded directions to Burlington, Vermont.

UMass police and college counselors met later that week with students from Maura's nursing class. The dean of the nursing school, Eileen Breslin, sent out an email to the entire nursing college alerting them of Maura's disappearance. Details about Maura's last few days on campus were starting to emerge, including the fact that Maura had reported a death in the family when there was no death.

It was later reported that Maura's credit cards, ATM card and cell phone had not been used since Monday. The location of Maura's cell phone could not be traced using GPS technology, possibly due to poor cell phone coverage or a dead battery.

In New Hampshire, the search efforts continued on Thursday. Fred and other family members posted flyers and canvassed the area. "We went to every spot we thought she might go to -- hotels and motels -- and put up flyers," Billy Rausch said later.

"Anything that looked suspicious we'd try to check it out," said Kathleen.

The first newspaper report about Maura's disappearance hit the stands that day, a 200-word news brief from the Manchester Union Leader. Maura was described as "possibly suicidal" by Chief Williams. Other news outlets quickly latched onto the story, including New Hampshire and Boston television stations which dispatched reporters to Woodsville. Police informed the media that no new leads had surfaced.

"We did an intense search of the crash scene area for evidence that she may have walked into the woods, but nothing like that was uncovered," Chief Williams told a New Hampshire TV station.

After wrapping up their own search that day, Fred and Billy met with reporters in an outdoor press conference in Bethlehem, N.H. on Thursday night. "This is very unusual," Fred explained to reporters. "It's not like her to just take off."

Fred pleaded for Maura to come home. "I don't know what the matter is, or the trouble you think you might be in, but it isn't anything we can't solve," he said through the media. "It's me - you can tell me. We'll work it out until we solve it."

Haverhill police were suspending their search efforts until new leads developed, Billy Rausch told reporters that evening.

Family members planned to continue their search into Vermont on Friday, reasoning that Maura could have been headed to Burlington or Stowe. But when Fred walked into Vermont police stations on Friday, he was dismayed to learn that local law enforcement officers knew nothing about Maura's disappearance.

"I could hit a three iron over the river into Vermont where there was no investigation," he said.

The frustration level was growing for family members. Fred was already distraught having learned that on Monday night, when Maura's car was found, the Haverhill Police had not called ahead to alert other police stations along Route 112.

"They should have put money and manpower where it counted -- February 9th and 10th," Fred said in a later interview.

New Hampshire State Police and Haverhill police officials no longer comment on Maura's case, referring all inquiries to the state Attorney General's office. In earlier reports they defended their actions on the grounds that there was no evidence of foul play.

Lt. John Scarinza, who is commander of State Police Troop F, which covers Grafton and Coos County, said at the time that he appreciated the family's frustration in not knowing what happened. "But it is also true that she was apparently leaving Mass. without telling her family or friends or her boyfriend," he told the Associated Press. He also speculated with reporters that Maura may have fled the scene to avoid arrest because she was intoxicated.

A manpower shortage could have hindered the abilities of the Haverhill Police. Due to sick time, training and vacancies the seven-man department was down to as few as three full-time officers and a chief at the time of Maura's accident, town records show.

Short of any new leads, official search efforts were curtailed as the days wore on.

Even so, more family and friends headed north to conduct their own investigations. Strangers who didn't know Maura also offered to help. They knocked on doors, made telephone calls and spoke with residents, including those who had called 911.

When Julie Murray finally got her leave from the U.S. Army and arrived in Woodsville the first thing she did was head to the scene of the accident.

"I wanted to see it as Maura had seen it -- after dark. I got out of the truck and walked up and down the road, looking at different angles and perspectives. There was a constant thought in my mind as I did this -- if I was Maura what would I have been thinking," Julie said in a recent email.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 7
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:59:08 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(7 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

"It was very cold, dark and quiet; I felt stunned. I will never forget that eerie feeling," she wrote.

Fred was unrelenting in his pursuit. He chased down every new rumor, turned over debris, looked through rivers and scoured every remote trail for any sign of Maura.

After spending hours searching in the woods "down long dirt roads where you wouldn't hear a thing," Fred would emerge, as he said, "muddy, gooey" and covered in "200 ticks...mosquitoes and black flies."

It was 10 days after Maura went missing when Fred realized that some residents living within eyeshot of the accident scene had not yet been interviewed. He voiced his displeasure with police.

Authorities then launched a second search, on Thursday, Feb. 19. State police, members of New Hampshire's Fish and Game conservation team, three search dogs and a helicopter crew searched a two-mile radius in the Route 112 Woodsville area.

"We wanted to make sure we had done everything twice," Lt. Scarinza told the Caledonian Record.

At a press conference held at the end of the day, Lt. Todd Bogardus of Fish and Game said the search came up empty. "Ground crews checked trails and roadways...there are no conclusive clues to continue," Bogardus told the Union Leader.

Lt. Scarinza concurred, saying, "We have a very good feeling we have done everything we can do at the crash site."

In a phone interview following the second search, State Police Sgt. Tom York, now retired, said that while there was no longer an active ground search underway, investigators were still "charging forward," looking into background information and other leads. 'We're concerned about where she is."

Sgt. York said that while police found no evidence of foul play to suggest a criminal investigation, he stressed that the term was just a "label" and that police would be treating the case much as they would a criminal investigation.

The second search had done little to assuage Fred's frustration. He feared the status of "missing person" would be a roadblock in pursuing an investigation, and told the media, "We should think of it in terms of a criminal investigation. ... Let's grab the bull by the horns and call it foul play."

As the second search came to a fruitless end, friends and family members began to return to their lives.

Billy had to get back to Fort Sill in Oklahoma, and about two weeks later, on March 2, Maura's siblings checked out of the Wells River Motel, fighting "utter exhaustion and desperation," a friend recalled.

Maura's belongings were returned to the family; Kathleen brought them to her house in Hanover. The car itself was released from police custody but remained at Lavoie's Garage in North Haverhill.

Bleary-eyed, but resolute Fred also checked out of the Wells River Motel after three solid weeks searching for Maura.

He was not giving up though; Fred would become a regular at the motel, returning nearly every weekend over the course of the next year.

Fred Murray was as determined as a man could be. The immediate search for Maura was over. His battle to find his daughter was just beginning.

Caption: Haverhill, N.H. Police Chief Jeff Williams displays Maura’s missing person poster. Photo Courtesy Littleton Courier.

Caption: Though it clearly pained him to talk about Maura’s disappearance, Fred welcomed the growing media attention the case generated, believing it to be a key in bringing his daughter home.

Part IV: The Aftermath

A song of gentle vocals played in the background as Fred Murray pulled down a faded blue bow from a tree on Wild Ammonoosuc Road in Woodsville, N.H.

It was February 9, 2005 just a few feet from where Maura's black Saturn was found pressed against a snow bank one year before. Joining him were family, friends, a local minister and a herd of media.

He stapled a bright bow and a fresh picture of Maura onto the tree. "I hope this is the last time I have to do this," Fred told reporters.

One year after his daughter's disappearance Fred Murray visited the scene of her accident and put up a new ribbon.

By now Fred Murray knew the area intimately. Ever since his daughter went missing, he had spent almost every weekend in the White Mountains, driving up from Bridgeport, Conn., to search for any clue to Maura's disappearance.

Earlier that same Wednesday morning, Fred tipped off the media that he was headed to the N.H. State House in Concord in hopes of meeting newly-elected Governor John Lynch. With media at his heels, Fred did meet with Lynch for about 10 minutes.

This was his latest plea for FBI help in the case. Since Maura was still considered a missing person, the FBI could only join the investigation if invited by New Hampshire State Police.

Fred also asked for the governor's help in releasing police records pertaining to the investigation. He had requested documents from police such as phone logs, and accident reports. The governor assured Fred he would look into the situation.

After the meeting, Fred told reporters he hoped Gov. Lynch would intervene on his behalf, but in an interview two years later he described the meeting as no more than "window dressing" -- an effort to show the public that the governor was a "good guy."

This was Fred's second appeal to a New Hampshire governor. In May of 2004, three months after Maura disappeared, Fred had petitioned then Gov. Craig Benson for help, based in part on a new lead that developed.

A local contractor named Rick Forcier had reported seeing Maura on the night of her accident around 8 about 4 to 5 miles from the scene of her abandoned car. Forcier lived on Wild Ammonoosuc Road about 100 yards from where Maura's car was found.

Forcier was returning home from a contract job in Franconia about 17 miles away when he observed a young woman who fit Maura's description running eastbound on Route 112.

When Forcier was first questioned by police, ten days after Maura disappeared, he did not mention seeing the girl running because he was confused about the dates and mistakenly thought it had been two nights after Maura's accident.

Nearly three months later, after hearing numerous news reports about the search for Maura, Forcier checked his work records and realized it was the same night as Maura's disappearance. Forcier told his story to Fred Murray, who relayed the information to police.

Caption: This A-frame home on Valley Road in Woodsville was the site of a search by private investigators in October, 2006. Cadaver dogs trained to track the fluids of decomposing bodies picked up scents in the house, according to investigators. Carpet samples from the homes were reportedly sent out for testing. No results have been released. The house is 3/4 of a mile from the scene of Maura’s accident.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 8
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 08:59:45 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(8 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

On April 29, Forcier was interviewed by State Police Lt. John Scarinza who checked out Forcier's time records at his job in Franconia and confirmed that his story was credible.

As a result of this new information, a search was conducted on May 8. Canine teams with six dogs and 15 Fish and Game officers searched the area where Forcier may have seen Maura running. No new leads were reported.

That same day Fred held a press conference at the Woodsville American Legion Hall with the parents of Brianna Maitland, a 17 year-old girl who was last seen after leaving her waitress job in Montgomery, Vermont, about six weeks after Maura went missing. Montgomery is located about 90 miles north of Woodsville. Maitland's car was found abandoned about a mile from where she worked. At the same press conference were the parents of Aime Riley who was last seen leaving a bar in Manchester, N.H. in August of 2003. Her body was found in April of 2004 in a pond in Manchester, N.H. about 120 miles south of Woodsville.

The press conference was another attempt by Fred to push for FBI help. He and the other families believed the three cases could be connected and since the Maitland and Murray cases crossed state lines, the FBI should be involved, they reasoned.

"Why wouldn't [state police] want the best help in the world?" Fred asked in a later interview. The FBI had been involved on a limited basis shortly after Maura disappeared, but its role was restricted to interviewing Maura's family and friends in Massachusetts. The Bureau would later take a more aggressive role in the Maitland disappearance but it has not been publicly involved in Maura's case.

Exactly one month later, on June 8, 2005, Vermont and New Hampshire State Police issued a joint press release stating there was no connection between the Maura Murray and Brianna Maitland cases. "Investigators believe that Maura was headed for an unknown destination and may have accepted a ride in order to continue to that location," said Lt. Scarinza in the release, adding there were "no signs of any struggle, or any other evidence, which would indicate that a crime had been committed."

Two weeks later, a N.H. State Police Trooper turned up on the doorstep of Maura's sister Kathleen's home in Hanover, Mass. The trooper requested that all items found in Maura's car be returned. Maura's belongings had been given to the Murray family within two weeks of the accident.

Police also confiscated the hard drive of Maura's computer, which had been in her dorm room and took custody of Maura's car, which had been sitting unlocked at a North Haverhill, N.H. garage since the accident. Police explained that a major crimes unit of the State Police was stepping into the case and wanted to conduct forensic tests of Maura's car and personal belongings.

The fact that the major crimes unit was just now getting involved in the case rankled Fred Murray, who said he was repeatedly assured that Maura's disappearance was being handled in the same manner as a criminal case despite the missing person label.

To this day, the Murray family is still in the dark as to why Maura's belongings were seized by police that day.

Another ground search was initiated on July 13. More than 100 searchers, including state police troopers and conservation officers, spread out across a one-mile radius of where Maura's car was found. No reason was given for why this search was conducted except to say police were looking for anything Maura may have left behind, such as the black backpack she was believed to have been carrying when she left the scene.

Meanwhile Fred Murray was conducting his own search. Nearly every weekend he drove to Woodsville to investigate any tip that came his way. Whether following up on supposed sightings of his daughter or checking out eccentric local characters, Fred was first on the scene.

Caption: "Any rumor, we'll look at," he said. "They are plenty of good suspects ... this is the worst place in the world to have an accident.”

Fred was not the only one carefully watching the local crime scene for a possible link.

"Every time some strange crime happens here people start saying 'maybe it's related to the Maura Murray case,'" said Bryan Flagg, a publisher and editor of the local newspaper, North Country News.

To this day, Fred traipses through remote paths of the New Hampshire forest, peers into strangers' vehicles, rummages in dumpsters and basements and even knocks on the doors of convicted felons. He is fearless in his search.

Fred's persistence resulted in a formal letter of complaint from Haverhill, N.H. Chief of Police Jeff Williams in April of 2004. Williams warned Fred that complaints of trespassing and parking on private property had been filed by area property owners and that repeat offenders would be arrested. Police would not say how many complaints were filed or by whom, though one resident and witness to the accident, Faith Westman, later admitted to submitting an official complaint; many other Woodsville residents have said searches had not been a problem and were sympathetic to Fred's situation.

Fred chased down rumor after rumor. Most led nowhere, but every now and then something turned up that merited further pursuit.

In late 2004, a man came forward to Fred with a stained, rusty jackknife. The stains were a reddish-brown color, Fred said. The man told Fred he thought his brother may have been connected to Maura's disappearance. At the time of Maura's accident the brother was living less than a mile away, the man related. He described his brother as having a record of violence and said that his brother's live-in girlfriend began acting strange around the time of Maura's disappearance.

Fred tried to turn the knife over to police but did not get beyond the plate glass window at state police headquarters, "I have what could be evidence in a capital crime," he recalled saying to the dispatcher, but the dispatcher said no one was available at headquarters to accept such evidence. Fred was told to come back during regular work hours. Fred then mailed the knife to state police along with all the information he received on the suspect. A few days later Fred received a proof of receipt that his package had reached the police but was never contacted by police regarding the knife or the possible suspect.

The man who came forward with the rusted jackknife died earlier this year. Efforts to reach his brother were unsuccessful.

The brother's identity and the identity of the man who approached Fred are not being disclosed because there is no evidence he is considered a suspect in Maura's disappearance. Police refused comment when asked about the knife.

In March of 2005, Fred, always relentless, made another push for FBI intervention and the release of police records on his daughter's investigation. He met with Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, Senior Asst. Atty. Gen. Jeff Strelzin, State Police Sgt. Robert Bruno, who is now retired, and State Police Lt. John Scarinza. In this meeting Fred again passed along the information regarding the knife. When Fred still didn't hear back from police after that meeting, he later said, "I knew I was doomed."

Fred's frustration, coupled with failed attempts to access police records for the case, spurred him to file a lawsuit against various law enforcement agencies including the State Police in late 2005.

Around this same time, about ten retired police officers and detectives volunteered to give fresh eyes to Maura's case. This team, called the New Hampshire League of Investigators, was not privy to confidential police records but analyzed the facts available to them, re-interviewed witnesses and family and generally attempted to provide a support network for the family, which was growing angrier and less trusting of police.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 9
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:00:26 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(9 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

"It is our job to be sort of a buffer between police and the family, to help the family understand what the police are doing behind the scenes," explained John Healy, a former N.H. State Police officer who is one of the team's leaders.

Healy's team followed up with various other sources and after a year of reviewing available materials, the volunteer investigators organized a two-day search in the last week of October in 2006. Canine teams were dispersed to six different publicly owned areas within five miles of where Maura's car was found.

Healy would not provide specifics as to why certain areas were searched explaining only that 95 percent of homicide victims are found within a five-mile radius of where they were last seen. It was the goal of investigators to thoroughly cover this area, he said.

Gravel pits and sand pits were searched, as these areas are ideal spots to dump a body. The area around French Pond Road was also carefully examined because of its close proximity. French Pond Road was the route Butch Atwood had driven in his own search for Maura shortly after she disappeared from the scene.

Fred was also present for the search and aggressively pushed investigators to search an A-frame house on Valley Road near the scene of the accident. He suspected it might be somehow connected.

The property was on the real estate market, so Fred sought out real estate agent Stan Davis and asked permission to search the house. Davis confirmed that he gave Fred his consent and provided him with a key to the house.

The fight for the house search was worth the effort.

On the first day, a cadaver dog searched the house and had hits on the second level; the next day four more cadaver dogs were put to work in the house and went "bonkers," Fred said. The strongest hits by the dogs were in a downstairs closet. Cadaver dogs are skilled in sniffing for decomposing bodies but are not able to distinguish the identities of bodies.

Though a dead body could have been stored in this closet, the dogs were not capable of identifying if the body was Maura.

The investigators took a few trash bags filled with items from the house and a piece of carpet from the closet. According to Fred, the carpet was to be divided into two pieces: a portion of the carpet was to be given to state police, who were not present for the search, and the other portion was to be held by the group of volunteer investigators. A medical laboratory examination was to determine if stains on the carpet were blood, and if available DNA matched Maura's. Seven months later, laboratory test results have not been made available from either group.

There is confusion over who has custody of the carpet. Private Investigator Healy was ill the weekend of the search, but said that police were not at all interested in the evidence and would not take the carpet into their possession. Healy said the carpet is in the custody of an investigator who no longer "has business relations" with the group.

Private Investigator Don Nason, who is the current president of the volunteer organization and was present at the search of the A-frame house, said all evidence was turned in to State Police. "We don't have the proper storage facility to hold evidence," he said.

Nason assured "everything possible was being done" to obtain a successful outcome in Maura's case and was enthusiastic about police efforts, "I have every faith in their work."

Healy believes the homicide unit has put more hours into Maura's case than any other in recent history. Jeff Strelzin, chief of the Homicide Unit and senior assistant attorney general, confirmed that State Police have put "hundreds of hours" into the investigation.

In a court hearing Strelzin argued that having records available to the public would hamper the prosecution if criminal charges were to be pressed in Maura's case. He predicted a 75 percent likelihood of prosecution.

"We do have information that we are pursuing that this may involve a crime," said Nancy Smith, senior assistant attorney general, while testifying in court.

As an investigator, Nason is also sensitive to the police investigation for fear of "compromising" the case. Nason said most information volunteer investigators gather is only released to State Police and the Attorney General's Office; "It doesn't even go to Fred."

Fred has given up hope on the effectiveness of the police, believing "shoddy work" is likely the reason they won't release records. "They didn't do what they were supposed to do, and they've been covering up ever since." He is also disillusioned with the league of private investigators.

Fred continues with his own search.

"Anything I want done, I do it myself," he said.

It's now a warm weekend in June. Nearly three-and-a half years have gone by. Maura's story still has no ending.

Fred Murray is back in New Hampshire. He's checked in to the Well Rivers Motel, the same motel he stayed in the first day he looked for Maura.

Fred sits in an easy chair in the corner of the modest room, leaning forward with his elbows on his knees, rubbing his hands together and mostly looking down as he recalls many months of court hearings, suspects and searches.

Suddenly, Fred jumps up. He stands squarely in the middle of the room with his hands on his hips. He is talking about Maura. He remembers a hike they took not long before she went missing. These are some of his most cherished memories. Maura tailed him along the steep pitches of Bond Cliff, a three peaked mountain trail in New Hampshire's White Mountains, Fred explains. The two climbed 23 strenuous miles of ascents and descents. When they finally reached the last peak, Maura pulled a Long Trail beer out of her backpack and handed it to her father. It was a celebration of their accomplishment together.

Fred finishes his story and the motel room is silent. He walks to a window overlooking a parking lot, his hands still on his hips.

The anguished father, who does not go more than minutes after waking each day before thinking about his missing daughter, stares out the window.

"Jesus," he sighs.

The Epilogue

"Do a story about the disappearance of Maura Murray," my editor told me, "and make it the most in-depth piece ever done on the case." At first it was a daunting task, but later a privilege.

I poured over old news articles, checked websites and jotted down questions. Then I called Fred Murray, Maura's father. My editor thought this would be a good start. He was wrong. Fred didn't return my call, or the next one, or the next one.

Plan B was more effective. I got in touch with Helena Murray, a relative who keeps Maura's case alive through a website. She explained that media attention so close to home can be difficult for Fred. "It means people will come up to him more frequently and want to talk about it on a day-to-day basis," she wrote in our first email correspondence.

With my editor's nudging, I persisted. I reached out to anyone who would talk to me. Investigators working on the case answered my most basic questions. Residents living in the area gave me new insight. Reporters reflected on when they first covered the story, and Maura's friends gave me a sense of who the pretty, brown-haired girl in the picture was.

On three occasions I visited the scene of the accident in Woodsville, New Hampshire. The last trip, when I retraced Maura's drive, is still vivid in my mind. It was past dusk when I crossed over the N.H. border. The night was foggy and I hugged the steering wheel tightly trying to get a better view of the road in front of me. I thought back to that cold February night when Maura risked the chance of snow while driving her worn out Saturn. At a snail's pace, I navigated onto the exit for Haverhill and wondered aloud, "What were you thinking?"

I found the Woodsville locals to be especially friendly, but whenever the topic turned to Maura, people usually clammed right up. A few spoke quite freely but only off the record.
Title: Newspaper Articles #212-Part 10
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:01:04 am
(https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1Uo8cOMiGLnwHT0tYVqveIOXImEXZ3tAo)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

(10 of 10)

Maura is Missing

By Maribeth Conway and Josh Cutler

After years of being hounded not only by media, but by investigators and family, some key witnesses such as Faith and Tim Westman, Rick Forcier and Butch Atwood are reluctant to speak further about the case.

I felt especially fortunate to score a conversation with Atwood, the bus driver, who was the last known person to speak to Maura. Atwood moved to Florida not long after her accident and has avoided the media ever since. He even refused to talk with a private investigator who traveled to Florida and showed up on his doorstep.

Unfortunately in a case with so little available information, it does not take much for some to cast a suspicious eye. Atwood's story and motives have been questioned in some online forums and clearly he has grown bitter from the entire ordeal.

"People think I had something to do with her disappearance," he said during our phone interview, "I can hear it in your voice; you think I did too."

Atwood explained that as a witness, the case had grown tiresome. "You think you're doing a good thing for someone, but I've learned, next time not to stop, I'm not stopping," he said.

Getting any information from police was even more difficult. I was continually referred to different departments of law enforcement for information requests and ultimately the Attorney General's Office stepped in to handle my questions. Unfortunately, the Attorney General's Office was no better able to answer my questions. Senior Asst. Atty. Gen. Jeff Strelzin agreed to produce certain documents pertaining to the case, but there was always a delay and no records have reached our office to date. Despite this we were able to obtain some key documents from other sources.

Fred must have heard about my trips up north - my meetings with Helena Murray and Maura's mom and sister - because four months after I began digging up information on Maura's case, Fred called. He wasted no time and got straight to the point. He was heading up to New Hampshire and I was welcome to join him.

I met Fred at the Wells River Motel in the town of Wells River, Vermont, just over the New Hampshire border. The Wells River Motel is the same motel Fred stayed at during the first search for Maura. Where do you begin when interviewing someone who spends much of his free time looking for his daughter's killer? I didn't need to know where to begin. Fred dove right in; he explained what he was doing that weekend in New Hampshire, what he had done his last trip and what the future would bring. He talked about the ongoing court case and liberally shared his criticism and mistrust of N.H. law enforcement.

One line Fred repeated throughout the day was, "it doesn't matter." If you ask what he did for a living, or why Maura packed her things, or didn't tell anyone where she was headed, he'll just answer, "It doesn't matter." "We'll never know why she came up here," Fred said.

All that matters to Fred is "what happened on Wild Ammonoosuc Road."

So what really happened to Maura? I'm as puzzled as most of you. I don't think it's much of a leap to dismiss the suicide theory so favored by police in the immediate aftermath of the accident.

Why did Maura bring her cell phone charger, birth control, insurance forms or school textbooks? Why would she have called a condo resort in Bartlett, New Hampshire just before leaving (A phone call that was not investigated by police for nearly a year). Maura was not driving aimlessly. She had some sort of a plan, a destination.

No doubt something was going on in Maura's life. Maybe she was unhappy or confused. Perhaps she was pregnant or preparing to drop out of school. There were certainly some issues with her relationship with her boyfriend, perhaps more than have been reported. Friends have described Maura as a private person and it is obvious she was a high achiever. Maybe she just wanted to get away as some of her friends suggest.

It is strange that Maura did not tell even her boyfriend Billy where she was headed. But then again Maura did attempt to reach Billy by phone and email on the Monday she disappeared.

It's also strange that Maura bought so much alcohol before her trip: bottles of vodka, Kahlua and Bailey's Irish Cream - none of which were found in her car. Where did the bottles go? They could have been stolen. Maura could have made a stop before reaching the snow bank in Woodsville or she could have brought these bottles with her to wherever she was headed. Was Maura meeting someone? Was she simply treating herself to a mudslide - a beverage made of vodka, coffee liqueur and Irish cream?

Some believe Maura was never at the scene of the Woodsville accident. Investigators who attempted to reconstruct the accident say the damage to Maura's car was not caused by the snow bank on Wild Ammonoosuc Road, where her car was found.

According to Atwood, who apparently spoke with Maura that evening, Maura had her hair down. Interestingly, Atwood later told a family member that Maura did not look like the pictures running in newspapers. Atwood clarified in our interview that the woman he spoke with did look like the pictures on the Missing Person signs, though it is worth noting that he and Maura remained 15 to 20 feet apart throughout their entire conversation and their encounter was past dusk.

Fred said there was an empty beer bottle found in Maura's car. I was told by others that the bottle was in the back seat and the rear driver's side window was open a crack. Perhaps someone was in the back seat of Maura's car at some point?

Nearly everyone I have interviewed over the past months suspects foul play. Fred believes Maura may have been drinking while driving as a soda bottle with an alcoholic smell was found by Maura's car along with a box of wine found inside the car. Maura may have feared a confrontation with police and tried to flee the scene by taking a ride from a passing motorist.

One detail I have not been able to wrap my mind around is the rag Officer Cecil Smith found stuffed in the Saturn's tail pipe. Even stranger, is that the rag was from Maura's trunk. Some people assume the rag indicates a suicide attempt while Fred believes Maura was tending to her rickety car. Maybe there is another explanation. Maura could have broken down earlier and received the help of a stranger. She may have opened her trunk to access her emergency kit and the stranger snuck the rag from her trunk and stuck it in her tailpipe without her realizing.

Considering search dogs lost Maura's scent in the center of Wild Ammonoosuc Road, it is quite possible she got into a passing car. Why would Maura get into a stranger's car? Maybe she knew the person driving by, maybe the person appeared harmless, trustworthy even. Perhaps Maura was unconscious or forced into a passing vehicle. Odds may be slim that a passerby happens to be a murderer but Maura could have been followed from a rest area or gas station. Her gas tank was nearly full.

Many residents in the Woodsville area own police scanners leaving some to theorize that Maura's accident, or the mysterious 7 p.m. accident, caught the attention of someone with nefarious intentions.

Theories abound about possible suspects living in the woods near the accident scene. This is not the forum to toss out names of potential suspects without specific evidence. If you sit in a room with Fred Murray you will easily walk away with a list of five or six suspects - basically the underbelly of Haverhill society.

While covering this story I found many sources mistrustful of police and hopeful that media involvement would shed light on the truth, while others were protective of the police investigation, believing I could interfere with future prosecution. I was also cautioned to not aggravate Fred's relationship with police, though this warning never came from Fred.

In the beginning I was not sure why I was writing this story. After unveiling new information, encountering the bureaucracies of N.H. law enforcement and witnessing a father's pain and determination, particularly his ongoing court battle, it was clear that Maura's story is very much alive and wanting to be told.
Title: Newspaper Articles #213
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:01:30 am
The Caledonian-Record

August 6, 2007

Reward Increased In Search For Maura Murray

By Gary E. Lindsley

It has been three years and nearly seven months since Maura Murray's black Saturn went off a rural road on a cold, dark wintry night in the town of Haverhill.

Murray, who at the time was a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was nowhere to be found when police arrived and has not been seen nor heard from since.

Now, an Arkansas-based group, Let's Bring Them Home, is trying to bring to light what happened to Murray, who was an accomplished athlete in track. The missing person's advocacy group is offering a $75,000 reward to help accomplish its goal.

"I have been compelled by circumstances of Maura's case," said Let's Bring Them Home Director LaDonna Meredith on Sunday. "I am a young person. I drive alone a lot. This could be me. This could be my sister. This moved me."

It was reported on Feb. 9, 2004, that Murray of Hanson, Mass., then 21 years old, lost control of her black 1996 Saturn on a curve on Route 112 near the Weathered Barn and crashed into a stand of trees.

John Healy, who is a member of a team of investigators working on the Murray case in concert with the Molly Bish Foundation, said the team has come up with other theories about what happened that dark February night.

Healy said although police have said Murray crashed her car into the trees, he and the other investigators do not believe it to be true.

He said, based on the damage to the Saturn, that it appears as if the car was traveling at a slow speed when it may have struck the underside of another vehicle; the actual crash site may have taken place somewhere else. Not only that, they believe Murray may not have been the young woman then-First Student school bus driver Butch Atwood saw. They believe the scene where the Saturn was found by Atwood may have been staged.

This does not mean investigators have absolutely ruled out that Murray was at the Route 112 site and simply fled. And they are not ruling out that she was abducted and killed.

Meredith is hoping the $75,000 reward will help bring answers to what happened to Murray the night she disappeared.

"Our hope," Meredith said, "is that this reward will generate the information that will help us locate Maura. We know that someone, somewhere, has information about her whereabouts and we implore them to come forward.

"Sometimes, people feel more comfortable talking to people not associated with law enforcement," she said.

"We knew the reward had to be significant because of the time span [since Maura was last seen]. We do see a big jump [in tips] when a big reward is offered."

Meredith said her group decided to take Murray's case after Murray's family asked for help. The reward is good to the end of the year because, Meredith said, tips usually only come in for a few months after being offered.

Helena Murray, member of Maura's extended family, is hoping the $75,000 reward will help spur people to bring information forward about what happened to Maura and tell where she is now.

"If you have information, now is the time," she implored. "I don't know [if the reward will draw people out]. Maura's not here and nobody is in jail."

Maura Murray's father, Fred Murray, could not be reached for comment. Neither could Sharon Rausch, the mother of Maura's boyfriend, Bill Rausch.

Besides the reward, Let's Bring Them Home is also offering a toll-free tip line: 1-866-479-5284 for people to call in with tips about Murray's whereabouts.

"We are here to support the families' efforts to recover Maura, and we believe that issuing this reward is the first step," Meredith said.

The reward is for the recovery of Maura Murray and the arrest and conviction of those responsible for her disappearance.

For more information on Maura Murray's disappearance or on Let's Bring Them Home, please visit www.letsbringthemhome.org or call 479-966-0471.
Title: Newspaper Articles #214
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:01:54 am
Boston Globe/Valley News

August 7, 2007

Group helps search for missing student

By Associated Press

HAVERHILL, N.H. - A missing persons' group is getting involved in the search for a University of Massachusetts nursing student who went missing in New Hampshire over three years ago. Arkansas-based Let's Bring Them Home is offering a $75,000 reward for information that could solve the mystery of Maura Murray, who disappeared Feb. 9, 2004. Her car left the road on Route 112 in Haverhill but she was gone when police arrived. The group's toll-free tip line is 866-479-5284.
Title: Newspaper Articles #215
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:02:37 am
The Patriot Ledger

August 7, 2007

Reward offered in missing woman case

By Karen Goulart

HANSON - If anyone knows what happened to Maura Murray on a frigid February night in New Hampshire nearly four years ago, they aren’t talking.

Relatives of the Hanson native and a national organization devoted to helping families find missing persons are hoping that money might loosen some lips.

The national group Let’s Bring Them Home is offering a $75,000 reward ‘‘for the recovery of Maura Murray and the arrest and conviction of those responsible for her disappearance.’’

In February 2004, Murray, a student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, told her professors that she needed to deal with a family emergency. After going to her dorm room and packing belongings, she drove to New Hampshire. She had not told anyone what her destination was.

On Feb. 9, her car went off the road and hit a snowbank on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H. Murray was nowhere to be found when police arrived.

Authorities consider her a missing person, but private investigators working on the case think she may have been abducted or killed.

Let’s Bring Them Home spokeswoman LaDonna Meredith said members of the Murray family contacted the group about nine months ago.

The nonprofit organization, based in Rogers, Ark., assists families of missing persons through public-relations work and is a clearinghouse of information about educational and support groups.

A picture of Maura Murray and information about her disappearance have been posted on the organization’s Web site. And now, so is a notice advertising a $75,000 reward, good until Dec. 31.

‘‘Looking at the facts in Maura’s case, we thought in order to generate tips we would need to offer a significant reward,’’ Meredith said. ‘‘Historically, when you offer a reward of that size, someone who knows something will talk.’’

Anyone with information is asked to call a toll-free ‘‘no cops’’ tip line.

‘‘It’s not answered by law enforcement. It’s just an answering service encouraging the person to leave a detailed message,’’ Meredith said. ‘‘The success rate with that - when someone does know something, something like this is attractive to them - nine times out of 10 people are going to call the number.’’

Meredith said phones rang constantly on Monday. Many were media calls, but some involved possible tips, she said.

Fred Murray continues to seek and follow leads in his daughter’s disappearance. He recently appealed, for a second time, a New Hampshire Superior Court ruling denying the release of police records about the case. He is thankful that Let’s Bring Them Home is offering the reward and hopes that it will prompt someone to talk.

Murray said any good citizen who had information would already have come forward. A person on the wrong side of the law might be afraid to talk, but the promise of money could change that, he said.

‘‘The reward is a good idea. I’m glad they’ve come forward with this,’’ Murray said. ‘‘It can only help. It’s kind of a play on human nature. It acts as an influence.’’

Murray said notice of the reward has appeared in Haverhill, N.H.-area newspapers. Meredith and Let’s Bring Them Home volunteers plan to visit the town in the fall, and he will be in town soon - as he often is - to hand out fliers.

And there is always the power of small-town gossip.

‘‘The grapevine there is a powerful thing,’’ Murray said. ‘‘The case is a general topic of conversation and the rumors fly. I’ve chased a million false leads, but I don’t mind hearing them. I’ll chase them all.’’

Information about $75,000 reward

Let's Bring Them Home, a national organization for families of missing persons, is offering a $75,000 reward for the recovery of Maura Murray and the arrest and conviction of anyone who may be responsible for her disappearance.

Anyone with information can call this toll-free, ‘‘no cops’’ number and leave an anonymous message: 1-866-479-LBTH (5284).

More information is available on the organization’s Web site, letsbringthemhome.org.

Karen Goulart may be reached at kgoulart@ledger.com.
Title: Newspaper Articles #216-Part 1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:03:39 am
New Hampshire Union Leader / New Hampshire Sunday News

October 28, 2007

(1 of 2)

Missing Maura Murray - [Four years] 45 Months and countless questions

By Nancy West

The longer Maura Murray is gone, the more it looks like the worst may have happened to the then-21-year-old nursing student after she crashed her car the evening of Feb. 9, 2004, on the edge of wilderness in northern New Hampshire.

Nearly four years after she disappeared from Haverhill without a trace, leaving not even a footprint in falling snow, police again are asking the public to search memories of that night for something overlooked -- anything that could be a possible clue.

Why did Maura withdraw $280 from an ATM, lie to professors that she would be gone a week because of a death in the family, buy her favorite liquor, pack all of her school books, a few clothes, a book about dying in the White Mountains, and head north with no word to any of the many people who love her?

Did Maura, a dean's list student at University of Massachusetts, travel to the White Mountains to commit suicide?

Did she drink too much during the first leg of her secret getaway and fall prey to the elements with 2 1/2 feet of snow on the ground?

Was Maura upset because she had crashed her father's new Toyota Corolla about 40 hours earlier, causing $10,000 in damage?

Or did something even more sinister happen, something her family and friends have feared since soon after they received word Maura was missing: that she trusted someone to help her and then died at the hands of a stranger.

Adding to the mystery, her then-boyfriend, Billy Rausch insisted a sobbing, shivering Maura placed a calling-card call to him 36 hours after her disappearance, then hung up.

"We don't know if Maura is a victim, but the state is treating it as a potential homicide," said Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeffery Strelzin. "It may be a missing-persons case, but it's being handled as a criminal investigation."

Strelzin said adults have the right to leave and not let family and friends know their whereabouts. But the longer she is gone with no trace, the higher the level of concern for Maura.

Maura's dad

Her father, Fred Murray of Weymouth, Mass., wants the FBI to take over the case. He believes the searches came too little, too late to save Maura, that more should have been done the night she crashed the Saturn.

"The police in New Hampshire can't do it. They've had three and a half years of nothing happening; that proves it," said Murray, a persistent critic of New Hampshire State Police Troop F and Haverhill police. "It's similar to a situation with a fire burning out of control. If the locals can't handle it, they call for help, and 'F Troop' is overmatched."

Murray said police waited 11 days to interview some of the people who lived near the accident site and then did so only after they were prompted. And, he said, police waited months before heeding pleas to call Dominic and Linda Salamone, who rent a condominium in Bartlett, even though Maura's phone records indicated she called their number at 1 p.m. the day she disappeared.

"Why would anybody have a reasonable belief (the police) were going to investigate at all?" Murray said.

It took at least 40 hours before a police brought a dog to track Maura's scent, he said. And then, Maura's scent ended in the road 100 yards from the crash with no hint of foul play, leading police to believe she took a ride away from the scene.

"I can't get it out of my mind that something stinks. I want to know what state trooper John Monahan was doing after the (dispatcher's) call when my daughter was walking down the street in pitch black with no one to ask for help, nowhere to run and nowhere to hide," Murray said.

The accident scene

Butch Atwood, a school bus driver who lived near the accident site, told police he drove past and stopped to help Maura after she crashed the Saturn into a stand of trees. She declined help, saying she had called AAA on her mobile phone, even though there was no cell reception in that location.

Maura pleaded with Atwood not to call police, according to one police news release. According to another release, Maura appeared impaired by alcohol.

Atwood, whose home was near the crash, called police anyway, as did another neighbor. But by the time police arrived about 10 minutes later, Maura was gone, leading authorities to believe at first the driver of the crashed car had fled the scene to avoid a drunken driving arrest.

The Bailey's Irish Creme, Kahlua and vodka Maura reportedly bought for the trip had been removed from the car, as had her black backpack and cell phone. A box of wine was still in the car.

Route 112 is a 56-mile stretch that connects Bath and Conway, winding through the scenic -- but largely remote and at times harsh -- White Mountain National Forest. Police believe she left Amherst, Mass., that day and traveled north on Interstate 91 in Vermont.

Maura knew the other end of Route 112 -- the Kancamagus Highway, east of Interstate 93 -- well, having hiked and camped there with her family since she was a child, even after her parents, Fred and Laurie Murray divorced when she was 6.

Maura's loved ones and police have disagreed on many issues regarding what happened just before and after the crash. Her father insists Maura would be alive today if not for what he sees as a botched investigation.

To date, there is one verifiable fact at the heart of her story: Maura Murray vanished on Route 112 in Haverhill on Feb. 9, 2004, as snow fell in pitch darkness on a cold winter's night.

The boyfriend

Sharon Rausch of Marengo, Ohio, loved Maura like a daughter. She said her son, Billy Rausch, was planning to become engaged to Maura. Though the young couple's relationship had been rocky at times, in early 2004 it was headed toward wedding plans, Mrs. Rausch said.

Billy was an Army lieutenant stationed at Fort Sill, Okla., when Maura disappeared. They had met as cadets at the U.S. Military Academy and continued a long-distance relationship after Maura left West Point and transferred to UMass.

(Billy graduated with Maura's older sister, Julie. Maura has another sister, Kathleen, and two brothers, Fred and Kurt.)

Billy Rausch spent time last week with his parents at their Ohio home, having recently returned from a year and a half in Iraq with a promotion to captain, Mrs. Rausch said. He was also awarded the Bronze Star, she said. He is scheduled to leave the Army in December.

Sharon Rausch had been very active in the search for Maura, reaching out to many media outlets and anyone who might be of help. The story has been told with talk-show hosts Montel Williams and Greta Van Susteren and on the TV news magazine "20/20."

Mrs. Rausch responded to an e-mail request to interview her son saying: "Billy is out of town on a job interview. However, even upon his return, he has decided that he does not want to comment. I agree with Fred (Murray) about Billy "getting on with his life.' I know that each time (Billy) becomes actively involved with the media that it truly re-opens his intense heartache from Maura's missing.

"If Fred ever wants/needs Billy's input, he will be glad to participate, but until then, he wants to remain out of the picture."

Police initially pointed to difficulties in Maura and Billy's relationship to support the theory of a possible suicide, but Mrs. Rausch said the couple was very happy together.

Maura's mother

Laurie Murray believes her daughter is alive. A former nurse, she has battled throat cancer and a bladder tumor during more than three and a half years of fear and hope, waiting for word from Maura.

"I won't give up hope," Mrs. Murray said. "My gut feeling is she was abducted and she is being held against her will. If she gets a chance, she will get away."

Or maybe Maura suffers from amnesia from hitting her head in the accident, her mother theorized.

Either way, "She had to get into a vehicle, in my mind," Mrs. Murray said.

Laurie Murray said Maura's survival skills were honed at West Point before she transferred to UMass. The Murray home is filled with trophies and awards Maura earned in cross-country and track, in high school and college. She ran at least five miles a day and enjoyed long, grueling mountain hikes with her dad.

Asked about suggestions Maura may have had a drinking problem, Mrs. Murray said she didn't believe Maura drank a lot.

"She had just turned 21; sure, she liked to party. It's like a big deal when they turn 21. I don't put too much weight on it," she said.

Mrs. Murray also doesn't believe Maura could have committed suicide.

"She was doing great; she was getting high honors in nursing," Mrs. Murray said.

Since Maura's disappearance, her sister Kathleen has married and her sister Julie, a West Point graduate, has started a new government job in Washington, D.C.

"I'm most proud of Maura for everything, not one thing. She's young, beautiful, with brains, personality -- everything -- and a million friends," Laurie Murray said.

As for the work done by police, Mrs. Murray said: "I think they did what they could. They were limited. It's a very small police department in Haverhill.

"They went out . . . Maybe if they searched more that particular night, it would have been a different outcome. I don't know," she said.

Maura had often camped with the family at Jigger Johnson campground on Route 112.

"Maybe she was heading to Woodstock. I know her cell couldn't work. She knew the area like the back of her hand. She certainly knew how to survive in wilderness," Mrs. Murray said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #216-Part 2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:04:07 am
New Hampshire Sunday News

October 28, 2007

(2 of 2)

Missing Maura Murray - Four years and countless questions

By Nancy West

Not forgotten

Many of Maura's friends who had kept in touch with her have stopped calling over the years, Mrs. Murray said, but the churches in Hanson, Mass., Maura's hometown, have not forgotten.

"Maura is mentioned at every Mass at St. Joseph the Worker Church," the family's parish, Laurie Murray said.

And the coming holidays, she said, will be marked by a close family supporting each other in a time of trouble.

"Julie just came home last week for three days, and she'll be home for Thanksgiving. Maura has a very good, supportive grandmother who is 87 and here with me now," she said.

Maura's mother's hope: "That she will come home, call home. I just pray."
Title: Newspaper Articles #217
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:04:34 am
New Hampshire Sunday News / New Hampshire Union Leader

October 28, 2007

Missing Maura Murray - Four years and countless questions - What happened? Theories abound

By Nancy West

During the nearly four years since Maura Murray vanished, dozens of questions have been posed and theories weighed on Web sites and in various accounts of what may have happened in Haverhill on the night of Feb. 9, 2004.

There have been hundreds of pages of Web chatter in which amateur sleuths try to solve Maura's mystery.

Why did Maura, 21, pack her room at University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass., before heading for New Hampshire that night?

Did she call on a calling card sobbing and shivering to her boyfriend, Billy Rausch, 36 hours after she disappeared?

Why was a rag stuffed in the tailpipe of her crashed car?

Was Maura upset because of a hit-and-run accident that seriously injured a fellow student on campus days before she left?

Chatroom investigators have tried to dredge up fresh leads while the people holding the best information have remained tight-lipped because Maura Murray's case is now being treated as a potential homicide.

"It's an open, ongoing case, which limits our ability to say anything substantial," said Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeffery Strelzin.

"Part of the difficulty is people try to ascribe importance to different facts, and, realistically, the true importance won't be known until the case is solved. We may think a piece of information is not important and not know its impact until down the road, when it turns out it's done damage to the case."

If you know something

State Police are actively investigating every lead into the disappearance of Maura Murry and make an appeal to the public for any information by contacting New Hampshire State Police at 603-846-3333 or 800-525-5555.

Rag in the tailpipe

Some have speculated the rag found stuffed in the tailpipe of the black 1996 Saturn Maura crashed in Haverhill indicated either a suicide try by carbon monoxide or a predator's ploy to make the car stall.

But Mike Lavoie of Lavoie's Auto Care Center in Haverhill, who towed the Saturn that night, said he later spoke with Maura's father, Fred Murray, about the rag. Lavoie said it couldn't have been used in that manner as part of a suicide attempt.

"Her father said he told her to put it in, that it would keep the car from smoking. It didn't run that well," Lavoie said.

Dorm room packed

Although police believe the belongings packed in Maura's dorm room were another indication she had no intention to return, the mother of Maura's then-boyfriend has another explanation.

Sharon Rausch thinks Maura hadn't yet unpacked her things after a long Christmas break. During one of Maura's visits to the Rausch home, Mrs. Rausch tried to loan her an extra suitcase, only to discover it hadn't been unpacked.

That made Maura laugh, Sharon Rausch said.

"Maura said, You're just like me. I unpack as I use my things.' That's out of her own mouth. Maybe she just never unpacked."

Trembling message

After finally getting emergency leave to head north to search for Maura, Billy Rausch -- at the time an Army lieutenant stationed at Fort Sill, Okla. -- was going through airport security early Wednesday, Feb. 11, 2004, and had to shut off his cell phone.

When he turned the phone back on, he discovered someone had left a voice-mail, he later told his mother.

"He said, Mom, it's Maura. She didn't say anything. She's shivering and cold,'" Mrs. Rausch said.

Billy tried to return the call but found its source to be a prepaid calling card.

Since that time, police say, they have tracked that call to a Red Cross assigned to working on Billy's emergency leave. And the troubling sounds in the recorded message, they say, were merely the result of a bad connection.

That explanation doesn't make sense to Mrs. Rausch, who said she was working with the Red Cross on Billy's leave, and therefore any calls from the organization would have gone to her, rather than to her son.

Distraught on the job

Mrs. Rausch said Maura worked security late Thursday, Feb. 5, 2004, into Friday morning checking students in and out of a UMass dormitory. Maura's supervisor that night said she found her sobbing at about 1:20 a.m. and had to help her back to Murray's room.

The source of her distress, Maura told the supervisor, was a phone conversation with Murray's sister.

Since married, Kathleen Carpenter remembers finishing a phone call with Maura at about 10:20 the night of Feb. 5, but doesn't recall talking with her sister in the early-morning hours.

Kathleen, who said she had talked about troubles with her husband-to-be during the nighttime conversation with Maura, said her sister didn't seem upset.

But, she added, Maura and Billy were having relationship troubles at the time. Kathleen said she takes sleeping pills at night and didn't remember a later call.

"We'd always talk about boy troubles. She was with Billy Rausch and every time they got into a fight or if had a fight with my (now) husband, I'd call her. It was girl talk, always late at night," Carpenter said.

She believes her sister went to the White Mountains to sort out her troubles with Billy.

"I think it was stress. I don't know what her and her boyfriend were going through," Carpenter said. "I kind of think that might have triggered it. They weren't getting along at that time.

"She wanted to go to a place that made her happy and look at the mountains, and something went terribly wrong."

Campus hit-and-run

A series of reports in Murray's hometown newspaper, the Hanson (Mass.) Express, raised the question of whether Maura could have been involved late that same Thursday night or early Friday morning when fellow student Petrit Vasi of Dorchester was injured in an apparent hit-and-run accident about 1?12 miles from the dorm where Maura worked.

Vasi's mother, Aprhodite Vasi, said her son has recovered but still doesn't remember what happened to him that night at about 12:20 a.m. Mrs. Vasi was told at the emergency room her son was involved in a hit-an-run accident, but there was never a follow-up investigation, Mrs. Vasi said.

Mrs. Vasi said Petrit remained in a coma for two months and remained hospitalized for a month after that. He had to cut short rehabilitation therapy, she said, because his insurance ran out.

"He doesn't know what happened, and nobody investigated for him," Mrs. Vasi said.

Sharon Rausch doesn't believe Maura was involved in the accident that injured Petrit. Murray couldn't have left her job long enough to be at the accident scene and return to the dorm, Rausch said.

Police also don't appear to be pursuing a Vasi-Murray link.

New Hamsphire State Police have stated that Maura was involved in only two recent accidents: the one in which she crashed her father's new Toyota in Hadley, Mass., and another that occurred about 40 hours later, when she hit a stand of trees in Haverhill with the black Saturn.
Title: Newspaper Articles #218
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:05:06 am
New Hampshire Sunday News

October 28, 2007

Maura Murray mystery timeline

Saturday, Feb. 7, 2004: Maura and her father, Fred Murray, look for used cars to replace her balky 1996 Saturn. After dinner at a brewpub in Amherst, Mass., Maura drops Fred off at the Quality Inn in Hadley, Mass., takes his new Toyota for the night, and joins friends at a University of Massachusetts dormitory party.

Sunday, Feb. 8, 2004: At about 3:30 a.m., Maura crashes the Toyota while driving back to her father's motel, causing $10,000 in damage. Police gave her a ride to the Quality Inn.

Monday, Feb. 9, 2004: Maura departs Amherst, Mass., at about 4:30 p.m., leaving behind packed belongings in her UMass dorm room. She took $280 from her personal bank account. Computer searches later show she looked up travel and lodging information for Bartlett, N.H., and Burlington, Vt., and sent e-mails to her job supervisor and a college professor saying she would be absent from work and school for a week due to a death in the family. There had been no recent death in the family, and she does not tell family or friends of her plans to leave campus.

At 7:27 p.m., Faith Westman calls Grafton County Sheriff's Department to report Maura's vehicle in a ditch on Route 112, on a sharp turn near Westman's residence. A passing motorist later says Murray refused his offer of assistance, claiming she already had called AAA on her cell phone. There is no cell-phone reception in that area, however, and AAA later says it never received a call from Murray.

At 7:43 p.m., a 911 dispatcher relays a second call on the Route 112 accident to the Grafton County Sherrif's Department, saying a woman at the scene is shaken up but not injured.

At 7:46 p.m., Haverhill Police Sgt. Cecil Smith arrives at the scene, finding a locked Saturn and no driver. Fire and rescue personnel who arrive at the scene inform all units to be on the lookout for a female accident victim, about 5 feet 7 inches tall.

At 9:26 p.m., police clear the accident scene.

May 8, 2004 -- Members of New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, New England K-9 Search and Rescue, New Hampshire State Police and Haverhill Police conduct a search in the Haverhill/Landaff/Easton area of Route 112 after a man reported having seen a person matching Maura's description jogging east on 112 about 45 minutes after the accident and 4 ½ miles east of the crash site. The search extends about 3 1/2 miles east of the reported sighting, to the height of the land at the Wildwood campground and picnic area, and for several miles north around Route 116. No evidence is found.

June 8, 2004 -- New Hampshire and Vermont State Police issue a joint press release saying there was no connection between the disappearances of Maura Murray and Brianna Maitland, 17, of Franklin, Vt. Maitland was last seen at work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, Vt., on March 19, 2004. A State Police news release summarizes the searches for Murray, saying there was about 2 ½ feet of snow on the ground when she disappeared, limiting areas she could have wandered into the woods, and making it easy for searchers to distinguish between human and animal tracks.

July 13, 2004 -- About 90 searchers continue to look for possible clues at and around the accident site in Haverhill. The search, which again includes use of a State Police helicopter, is focused in a 1-mile radius from the accident site. Search areas include parking sites, wooded areas and roadways along Route 112 to the town of Woodstock; and Route 118, from the Junction of Route 112 south to the height of the land at the Woodstock/Warren town line. Investigators do not believe any of the items collected to be relevant.

Sources: New Hampshire State Police, Grafton County dispatch records.
Title: Newspaper Articles #219
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:05:34 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

October 29, 2007

Family: No way it was suicide

Second of three parts

By Nancy West

Whether Maura Murray came to northern New Hampshire Feb. 9, 2004, to end her life is an emotional question for her family.

Her loved ones say it is far more likely she was abducted and killed that night after crashing her 1996 black Saturn into trees about 7:30 p.m., that they were simply all too close for Maura to have been secretly despondent to the point of considering taking her own life.

Authorities are calling Maura's disappearance a potential homicide, keeping most of the records closed in a criminal investigation file.

"A lot of things about the case are unique and troubling," said Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeffery Strelzin.

But, he cautioned, the puzzle simply hasn't been solved yet, so there is no way of knowing the truth about the fate of the 21-year-old nursing student from Hanson, Mass.

Maura's case has seemingly headed in several directions -- from police leaning toward the theory that yet another drunk tourist abandoned a crashed car to avoid drunken driving charges that night to potential homicide.

Nothing has been ruled out for certain, including the theory that Maura has gone away to start a new life, although that seems the least likely.

Almost four years later, it is still a mystery, but the suicide theory has been hard for the people who love her to even think about.

Early on, her father, Fred Murray, briefly considered Maura may have committed suicide.

When police assembled the Murray and Rausch families to brief them on the investigation, Maura's father "moaned and rubbed his head and said, 'Oh, no,' " according to Sharon Rausch, the mother of Billy Rausch, Maura's then-boyfriend.

"I remember Fred said, 'I always have told the kids when I got old and worthless I was going to climb my favorite mountain with a bottle of Jack Daniels and drink myself to death.' That was emotional. He thought what if there was something he didn't know about," Rausch said.

She said authorities thought the alcohol and Tylenol PM Maura brought may have been indications she was going to kill herself. "That's what people do, they drink, take a bunch of pills and die peacefully," she said.

But Rausch doesn't believe that was Maura's plan. The Kahlua, vodka and Bailey's Irish Creme Maura reportedly brought with her would likely have been about a week's worth of the drinks Maura liked, Mudslides, Rausch said.

When visiting the Rausch family in Marengo, Ohio, Maura would add Bailey's to her coffee in the morning and drink Mike's Hard Lemonade with lunch, she said. Maura and Billy always had their stash of alcohol because Rausch doesn't drink, but she said Maura didn't drink excessively.

Private get-away

She believes Maura left the University of Massachusetts without telling anyone why or where she was going to have a private getaway to think things over.

Rausch believes Maura had all her school books in the car to keep up with her school work while she decided whether to leave school and go to work to pay for the damage she had done to her father's car after crashing his new Toyota the previous weekend.

She said Billy was upset after arriving from Fort Sill, Okla., where he was stationed.

"Fred arrived in Haverhill early Wednesday. We arrived Wednesday around 7 p.m. They interviewed Billy. He was a prime suspect. He was totally distraught. I'll never forget the look on his face. He said 'I feel as dirty as Scott Peterson. They think I've got something to do with it.'" Rausch said.

Fred Murray recalls that meeting with police, but remembers talking about a movie he had seen in which an old Indian woman walks off to die when she felt she was too old to go on.

"I hadn't talked about suicide," Murray said. "No, I gave them the analogy of the old Indian woman off the bat," he said. "I remember discussing the old Indian ... It was a freaking nightmare. They just dropped the ball."

For the next two weeks, both families believed Maura was alive, that she had broken into a cabin because she was a survivor, was in excellent health and ran five miles a day, Rausch said.

Book lead

The book "Not Without Peril" subtitled "150 Years of Misadventure on the Presidential Range of New Hampshire" by Nicholas Howe was found in Maura's locked car. A gift from her father, the book chronicles tragedies and rescues in New Hampshire mountains.

Rausch said police told the family the book had a photo of Maura's younger brother as a "bookmark" at a chapter entitled "A Question of Life or Death."

But even that is a red herring, Rausch believes, because it was Maura's favorite and she often re-read it, having brought it once on a visit to the Rausch home.

"While it's all true stories about people hiking and either dying or surviving a snow storm, it's also a survivor's manual more than about suicide," Rausch said.

Rausch said Maura was planning to become a physician's assistant after nursing school. She recalled how her son loved Maura, coming home one day to say he found someone with beauty, brains and wit -- and someone who could even outrun him.

Maura's father believes his daughter had too much going for her to commit suicide: a great boyfriend, future career and supportive family.

"Maura was such a personality. Everybody would seek her out. She was extremely popular, lively and fun," Murray said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #220
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:05:55 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

October 29, 2007

Could she have decided to disappear? - Could Maura Murray have simply decided to run away and begin a new life?

It is probably the least likely scenario police are considering, but something similar has happened recently in New Hampshire, although for a much briefer time.

Laura Mackenzie of Goffstown was an 18-year-old high school honor student when she sparked a nationwide search after disappearing March 8, 2006.

Mackenzie never spoke a word about her disappearance to friends of family members. In five months' time, she did not use her ATM card, her e-mail account or a cell phone.

Investigators followed leads that suggested Mackenzie might have traveled all the way to California.

She had run away to Florida to avoid facing a shoplifting charge.

She worked as a waitress until being discovered in St. Augustine Beach in August 2006. Mackenzie later reached a plea bargain and agreed to pay for her extradition to New Hampshire.

"I am very sorry for the pain, time and expense associated with the search to find me during the time I was gone," she said after pleading guilty to a shoplifting charge in Hillsborough County Superior Court.
Title: Newspaper Articles #221
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:06:49 am
The New Hampshire Union Leader

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Dad won't give up on the search

By Nancy West

Fred Murray of Weymouth, Mass., is a man on a sad mission.

Since his daughter, Maura Murray, 21, disappeared after crashing the 1996 black Saturn she was driving Feb. 9, 2004, in Haverhill, he has spent many weekends scouring northern New Hampshire for any hint of her fate.

"I think a dirt bag grabbed her. I said that right off the bat," Murray said.

A few weeks ago, he tracked down tips that Maura had been murdered and her body parts buried in a sand pit.

"It makes me pretty mad. This involves the same people who are my chief suspects and the cops say, 'We looked into that,' but I don't know what that means," Murray said.

Murray talks with people on the street, private investigators and psychics and goes to local bars to find any tidbit of information to lead him to a new search. Many have led nowhere -- like a stained knife someone turned over to Murray, and a search volunteer private investigators conducted of a vacant A-frame.

"That's been debunked," he said.

Murray has been to most surrounding towns on the prowl for "dirt bags" and "renowned dirt bags" in Littleton, Lisbon, Landaff, Bethlehem and Whitefield. He cruises rural roads, looking for turnoffs and secluded areas a killer might seek out.

Critical of police

Murray is critical of New Hampshire police, ridiculing state police Troop F as "F Troop bunglers." Murray is also blunt in his disdain for New Hampshire authorities and angry because he believes Maura would be alive if police had done their job properly.

A more thorough search on the dark, winter night she disappeared, leaving her car locked behind her and no solid clues to her whereabouts, may have meant the difference between life and death, he said.

Murray also heaped criticism on several newspapers, including the New Hampshire Union Leader, and accused them of conspiring to cover up mistakes he says were made by law enforcement.

But despite all of his suspects and tips, Murray is no closer to solving the case. That's why he wants access to police files.

"I don't know who grabbed her. All possibilities exist," he said.

He doesn't know why Maura left the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass., without a word to anyone. He said the family spoke on the phone often and got together regularly on weekends; he and Maura especially liked to hike in the White Mountains.

"There must have been a series of nearly simultaneous things built up that bothered her, no one thing, maybe a handful of things taken together produced an effect of temporary desperation. I don't think there was one major thing, but a combination of events. It was so unlike her to do something like this," Murray said.

The fateful weekend

One thing that bothered Maura a lot was that she crashed Murray's new Toyota in Hadley, Mass., when her father was visiting her at school just 40 hours before she crashed the Saturn in Haverhill.

"On Sunday, she was hurting. She let dad down. I was over that by Sunday night in my phone call to her," Murray said.

Over the weekend, he had been helping Maura find a used car, because the 1996 Saturn was running so poorly. He was staying at a motel in Hadley, Mass., near the campus.

After dinner with her father and a friend at a local brewpub in Amherst, Mass., Maura dropped her father at the motel, took his new Toyota Corolla and partied in a dorm room.

Maura crashed his new Toyota into some guardrails Sunday, Feb. 8, 2004, at 3:30 a.m. on Route 9 in Hadley, causing about $10,000 damage. The accident report cited driver inattention.

After the crash, she got a ride from police to her father's motel.

"We handled the disposition of car repair. She was upset because she let her father down, in her view. My reaction is in 21 years, if this is the only trouble my kid caused me was a car accident, how lucky am I," Murray said.

Maura picked up the accident report forms from the Hadley crash and was going to go over them with her father the night she disappeared. Two copies were left behind in the Saturn.

"She was supposed to call me at 8 that night so I could help her go over them on the phone. She did pick up the accident reports. She had every intention of calling me," Murray said.

Murray doesn't believe his daughter could have been pregnant. "No, she was on birth control pills," he said.

And he doesn't think there were any big problems in her life.

Murray has re-filed his right-to-know appeal to the New Hampshire Supreme Court, after losing his first fight to get access to police files on his daughter's disappearance. No briefs have been filed yet, and that will likely take months.

Murray has also appealed to Gov. John Lynch and his predecessor, Craig Benson, for help.

When Maura disappeared, Murray reportedly worked in radiology in Bridgeport, Conn., but he refuses to say what he does now, although he did say he has held his current job for 2 1/2 years. He said he splits his time between Weymouth and Cape Cod, and doesn't tell coworkers Maura is missing.

"People feel it's an awkward situation. They feel they have to say something like good luck. It's easier on people and myself," Murray said.

Still, every morning when he wakes up, it takes about five seconds before Maura comes to mind.

"I wake up. I know I've got to go to work, but wham," Murray said.

Sharon Rausch, the mother of Billy Rausch, Maura's boyfriend at the time she disappeared, praised Murray's dedication in searching for Maura.

She said she hasn't been as active in the search this year because of family commitments at home in Marengo, Ohio.

"Fred, he is still up there searching. God love him, he's just hurting.

"We've always been here for him," Mrs. Rausch said.

FBI help

Murray wants the FBI to take over the investigation. The FBI conducted some interviews with Maura's friends early on, but nothing substantial, he said, adding authorities should invite them to participate now in the full investigation.

"We need an organization to take a fresh look with an unjaundiced eye," Murray said.

Murray enjoyed spending time with Billy Rausch, who was dating Maura in a long-distance relationship when she disappeared. Rausch, now a U.S. Army captain, has been serving in Iraq for a year and a half and just recently returned to the states. He was stationed in Oklahoma when Maura disappeared.

Rausch and Maura met at West Point before she transferred to UMass.

"I want the kid to be able to get on with the rest of his life without carrying this as an obligation," Murray said.

If by some chance Maura is alive, Murray would want to say to her: "Miss you, kid. Get back home. You're not in trouble. We'll pick up from where you are ... I want my buddy back.

"She was my buddy; we hung around together," Murray said. After his divorce, when Maura was six, he was determined to see his children every day when they were growing up.

Murray has many fine memories of runs and hikes with Maura, but one of the best was the autumn before she disappeared.

"We were concluding our collection of 4,000-footers. I was doing the last three I hadn't done." One day, they hiked to Owl's Head; the next day 23 miles on three 4,000-foot peaks.

"Then she whipped out of her knapsack for finishing my 48th, a Long Trail Ale, and handed it to me on the summit of West Bond.

"It was typical Maura," Murray said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #222
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:07:14 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

October 30, 2007

Group offers $75,000 reward, plans a search

By Nancy West

Even the wording for the $75,000 reward echoes a heightened level of fear for Maura Murray.

The reward is for the recovery of Maura and arrest and conviction for those responsible for her disappearance, according to LaDonna Meredith, director of Let's Bring Them Home. It is an Arkansas-based group dedicated to helping find missing people.

The group is organizing another search for Maura in northern New Hampshire sometime in November.

The $75,000 reward expires Dec. 31. There is a separate $40,000 reward posted from donations from family and friends, but that one is for the safe return of Maura.

"We have had tips come through on the hotline, unfortunately nothing new or substantial," Meredith said. "The number to call is 1-866-479-5284. We just need that hotline to ring," Meredith said.

Maura, who was a nursing student at University of Massachusetts, is described as having brown hair, usually pulled back in a bun and blue eyes. She is 5-foot-7 and weighs 120 pounds.

Murray's family hopes the promise of cash and deadline will prompt someone to come forward soon with new information about what happened to Maura.

"What is so surprising is no one has come up with anything, not a trace. We've had the FBI, police, several search teams. People just don't disappear without a trace. That's unheard of," said Maura's mother, Laurie Murray, who lives in the family home in Hanson, Mass.
Title: Newspaper Articles #223
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:07:41 am
New Hampshire Union Leader

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

State police make appeal for information

By Nancy West

State Police Lt. John Scarinza, commander at Troop F, said there have been extensive ground and air searches and thousands of hours dedicated to finding Maura Murray since her car crashed Feb. 9, 2004, on Route 112 in Haverhill.

"And yet we have not been able to determine what happened. What else can be done?

"Again, with deer season approaching, if anyone sees anything out of place -- a piece of clothing, anything they feel is important -- please let us know," Scarinza said.

Contact state police at 846-3333 with any information, he said.

Scarinza wants people to search their memories yet again for clues they may have missed, anything at all unusual on or near Route 112 that night.

"The other component we have encouraged over and over again is, if anybody thinks they saw Maura Murray or anybody on Route 112 -- or, more importantly, gave somebody a ride -- it would be extraordinarily helpful to us," he said. "Also, if anyone remembers picking up a hitchhiker. Maura doesn't have to be on 112."

Scarinza believes Maura had a destination in mind when she left the University of Massachusetts-Amherst about 4:30 p.m. the day she disappeared. She knew Route 112 because her family had often camped and hiked along there since she was a child.

"Clearly, she had a destination point, and we have not been able to determine what that is. It's fair to say if anyone has anything on that, we'd like to know," Scarinza said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #224-Part 1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:08:29 am
Boston Globe

February 3, 2008

Return to Me

(1 of 2)

By Stacy Chase

Last year's dramatic rescue of Shawn Hornbeck and Ben Ownby proved that missing children - even those gone for years - can be found. But it also serves as a grim reminder that many parents wait years, decades, lifetimes without ever learning the fate of daughters and sons who vanish.

These are the families' websites for some of the missing children featured in this story:

Brianna Maitland: bringbrihome.org

Kimberly Moreau: findkim.com

Maura Murray: mauramurraymissing.com

Angelo "Andy" Puglisi: haveyouseenandy.com

On May 10, 1986, Kimberly Moreau and a neighbor girl were hanging out in the hardscrabble towns of Jay and Livermore Falls when they met two 25-year-old men cruising Main Street in a white Pontiac Trans Am. The four paired off and partied. Eventually, Kimberly and one of the men ended up in the car alone. At about 11 p.m., they swung by her house on Jewell Street in Jay. The teen ran in, told her 19-year-old sister, Karen, she'd be back in an hour, and then got into the car idling outside. She has not been seen or heard from since.

"This is Marilyn Monroe, this is D.B. Cooper, this is Jimmy Hoffa - I mean, for this area," says State Police Detective Mark Lopez, the lead case investigator.

Dick Moreau, 65, has spent two decades hounding the man in the Trans Am, who Lopez says is a "person of interest" in Kimberly's disappearance. "Any time I get the chance to rattle his cage," Moreau says, "I do it." The enraged father has plastered Kimberly fliers on telephone poles leading to the man's house, convinced him to have a three-hour chat at Moreau's kitchen table, talked him into taking a lie-detector test, and showed up at his brother's funeral last spring with Lopez. "I told him I was sorry for his loss of his brother," Moreau recounts. "Then I leaned into him, squeezed his hand, and said, 'I know exactly, exactly how you feel."

Families of children who have gone missing suffer through an unthinkable saga of fear, uncertainty, guilt, and grief. Often, they cope with their heartbreak by an almost obsessive need to know what happened, turning to private investigators, psychics, or prayer. Many investigate on their own, meeting with law-enforcement officials and other sources and scouring the Internet for clues. Starting next year, they and the rest of the public will be able to fully search the US Department of Justice's still-in-development National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, the first nationwide, online repository of databases of missing-persons reports and records of those who died without being identified. Some families of the missing reach out and console parents who have more recently lost children. Still others retreat into their pain.

It's been a year since the public was reminded of these families' torment when Shawn Hornbeck, then 15, and Ben Ownby, then 13, were rescued from the Missouri pizza-parlor manager who had kidnapped and sodomized them. Shawn had been held captive for four years; Ben, for four days. The older boy's recovery reignited the possibility that other coldcase missing children might be found alive. "It's proof positive that missing children can come home," says Colleen Nick of Alma, Arkansas, a national advocate for missing children whose 6-year-old daughter, Morgan Chauntel Nick, was abducted in 1995 from a Little League baseball game.

But until a child, or a child's remains, are found, searching families are left suspended "between hell and hope," says Magdalen Bish of West Warren, mother of 16-year-old murder victim Molly Bish, whose 2000 abduction from nearby Comins Pond galvanized one of the largest kidnapped-child manhunts in Massachusetts history. Molly's remains were found three years later, 5 miles from her home. (No arrests have been made.) "If you find out your child is dead," says Bish, 56, a first-grade teacher, "your hope is lost, but your hell has ended, because you don't have to worry that anyone is harming them."

The worst child predators are rare. Of the 797,500 children younger than 18 reported missing to authorities in 1999, the last year for which data are available, the vast majority were classified as runaways or "thrown-aways"; were victims of family abductions, typically carried out by parents who didn't have custody; or were only temporarily missing, with a benign explanation. Only an estimated 115 were the victims of what experts call "stereotypical" kidnappings, defined as crimes perpetrated by a stranger or slight acquaintance in which a child is transported 50 miles or more, detained overnight, held for ransom, taken with the intent of being kept permanently, or killed. Of those returned to their families, nearly half have been sexually abused and about a third injured by their captors. Four in 10 stereotypical kidnapping victims - predominantly white teenage girls - end up dead; 4 percent are never found. Last September, the FBI signaled how seriously it takes the risk posed by those who prey on children when it added New Hampshire pedophile Jon Savarino Schillaci to its Ten Most Wanted list, alongside Osama bin Laden and James "Whitey" Bulger.

WHEN THE NATIONAL MISSING AND UNIDENTIFIED PERSONS SYSTEM becomes fully available next year, families of missing children will have more clues at their fingertips. But already they troll websites like The Doe Network and others, picking through grisly case files of unidentified human remains found across the country, looking for a match. Kellie Maitland of DeKalb Junction, New York, has stared at the morgue photographs and forensic artists' renderings of Jane Does - grotesque, wax-museumlike figures with dead eyes - searching for the face of her missing daughter, Brianna Maitland. The bestcase but least likely scenario, she says, is that Brianna "ran off or fell in love with someone and made a split decision, took off to somewhere warm and exotic and is having a good time."

Brianna, then 17, was last seen at about 11:20 p.m. on March 19, 2004, leaving the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, Vermont, where she was a dishwasher. The next day, her Oldsmobile Delta 88 was found a mile away backed into the side of an abandoned house, the rear bumper hung up on the concrete foundation. There were no signs of a struggle and no sign of Brianna. "The police tell me that most likely this was a homicide," says Maitland, 47, who helps her husband, Bruce, run their small Highland-Angus cattle farm. "If Brianna's alive, she won't be a teenager anymore. She'll be, like, 21. What if she's been abused? What if she needs rehab? What if? What if?"

In the early days of the search, the mother - who speaks of Brianna in both the present tense and past tense - heard that a body in a garbage bag had been discovered near where her daughter had disappeared. "We tried to go bed that night," she recalls, "and we laid down and we held hands and we just hoped that it wasn't her. `Please, just don't let it be. Don't let it be.' " When morning came, the couple's prayers were answered: The remains were those of a pig.

The anguish of not knowing, and the search for answers, often takes parents of missing children on "horrendous emotional roller-coaster rides," says Nancy McBride, national safety director at the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. "A lead will come in; it will look really, really promising and then turn out not to be. . . . You're up and you're down, there's really no steadiness. You're also in this limbo where you can't really move forward."

Brianna Maitland's father, Bruce, and Fred Murray of Weymouth, whose daughter is also missing, became friends as they searched for a possible connection between their cases, though police agencies have ruled that out. Maura Murray, a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student, vanished after crashing her car into a snowbank in Woodsville, New Hampshire, near the Vermont border, the night of February 9, 2004 -the month before Brianna's disappearance. The fathers' newly forged bond is based not only on a mutual effort to find their daughters, but also an unspoken understanding: "We don't say, you know, 'Poor you. Poor you,' " Murray says. "Everybody's grief is personal. He knows how I feel; I know how he feels."

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children has a support group for searching families, called Team HOPE, but many families, like those of Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray, create their own informal networks to console and assist one another through the overwhelming trauma. Bereft parents, siblings, even aunts and cousins call and e-mail one another with encouragement, link to other families' websites to publicize their cases, print and distribute missing-child fliers and buttons, participate in searches for one another's children, and send sympathy cards and flowers when a child's body is found.

LYMAN AND CLAIRE MOULTON OF Portland, Maine, have been keeping a private vigil for 37 years for the 16-year-old daughter they knew - and her alter ego, a 52-year-old woman they can't imagine - hoping against hope she's still alive. Their ordeal began the afternoon of September 24, 1971, when Cathy Marie Moulton got a ride into town from her father to buy pantyhose for the YWCA dance she planned to attend that night. She was supposed to walk the 2 miles back along busy Forest Avenue but never made it home for dinner. "One of my greatest - greatest, greatest - sadnesses is that I may die ... and never know what happened to Cathy," says her 83-year-old father, a retired auto dealer, his blue eyes turning moist. "And yet I'm helpless to change it."
Title: Newspaper Articles #224-Part 2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:09:08 am
Boston Globe

February 3, 2008

Return to Me

(2 of 2)

By Stacy Chase

Former Portland detective William Deetjen, who worked the case in the late 1980s, theorizes that, after shopping in Portland, Cathy accepted a ride in a Cadillac from a boy she liked. Weeks later, there were unconfirmed sightings of the pair and another male in remote, sparsely populated Aroostook County - about 300 miles north of Maine's largest city - but no solid evidence she had been there or had been abducted.

For years, her parents have been tormented by something one of the purported witnesses said: that Cathy, working in the potato fields, kept begging to go home. "I've always held out the hope that, maybe, somehow, she has amnesia as a result of a beating or something," says Claire Moulton, a 78-year-old former nurse, "and she is alive and has a life and doesn't know who she is."

Experts say families looking for lost children experience a unique kind of despair. "Parents are fearful about their child's uncertain fate and feel guilty for not adequately protecting the child," says Dr. Sharon Cooper, a Fayetteville, North Carolina, forensic pediatrician and authority on crimes against children. The ongoing absence is like a death, without a body to grieve over.

"It's like your worst, most horrible nightmare that you never wake up from," explains John Walsh, the host of the Fox television series America's Most Wanted and the father of 6-year-old Adam Walsh, snatched from a Florida shopping mall in 1981, killed, and decapitated. (The prime suspect was never charged and died in prison serving life for other crimes.) "And it's not just grief. It's disbelief.

"We celebrate Adam's life, not the horrible day that he was found missing," the 62-year-old Walsh says, "but we're only able to do that because we know where he is and what happened to him. . . . I can name thousands of cases where parents have no idea what happened to their child. Dead, alive? Is the child involved in the sex trade? Child pornography? Where is the child? How were they murdered? Where is the body, so we can go and pay our respects to it?"

MANY PARENTS OF MISSING CHILDREN devise "one view of the future that includes the missing child and another future that does not," says Cooper. They can vacillate back and forth, or they can hold dual perceptions forever. Often, though, when the missing child reaches theoretical adulthood, that coping mechanism collapses. "If the missing child has now become an adult in the parent's mind, if they are still alive . . . the parent is expecting the child to now be able to make the decision that they'll come back home." If the child does not return, she says, the parents must confront four possible reasons: The child is dead; has forgotten the parents (credible for children kidnapped at age 6 or younger); is angry at the parents for not protecting or finding him or her; or is physically restricted or confined.

It took Faith Puglisi of Fountain, Colorado, 30 years to come to the conclusion that her missing son most likely was murdered. Ten-year-old Angelo "Andy" Puglisi disappeared August 21, 1976, from Higgins Memorial Pool in Lawrence, about 100 yards from his front door. Several investigators and family members interviewed for last year's Cinemax documentary Have You Seen Andy? by Medford filmmaker Melanie Perkins are convinced he was stalked and abducted by a sexual predator or predators working in concert. (The case remains unsolved.) "Every now and then, I go into that room that is Andy's room in my heart, where I keep all the information and all the emotions about him," says Puglisi, a 58-year-old pediatric nurse who says she copes by compartmentalizing. "When that door pops open - and I'm starting to connect with all this emotion - there's always that risk I'm going to lose it. A lot of times, I have to slam that door shut."

Some parents never accept the possibility that their longtime missing child is dead. Experts says that's because, psychologically, they have spent years keeping the child alive in their minds, and in everyone else's memory, and by suddenly choosing to believe that the child is deceased - without irrefutable proof - parents feel as though they have killed the child in their thought processes.

"We have a nine-room house here that the children grew up in," Lyman Moulton says, mentioning he and Claire have talked about abandoning their Dutch Colonial for smaller quarters, "but the truth of the matter is, Cathy lived in this house. The truth of the matter is, she knows, or hopefully would know, where this house is." Wringing his hands, he adds: "We've kept the same phone number. I would fight to the end of time to keep this phone number. . . . You could say, 'Oh, my Lord!' but what else have we got?"

Families of cold-case missing children go on missing them - long after the press and public have lost interest - and, in the end, only finding the child or the child's remains can put to rest their searching and waiting.

"You never get to say goodbye, you know," says Magdalen Bish, mother of the Massachusetts girl whose remains were found. "When Molly came home, we just had her 26 bones. We held her skull. We touched her bones, because we needed to say goodbye, but it wasn't the Molly that we knew."

For Dick Moreau, even a fragment of one of the 206 bones in the human body would be enough. Slowly, agonizingly, Moreau had come to the conclusion that his daughter was dead, and he had a death certificate issued in 1993. Now he'd like to bury Kimberly next to her paternal grandparents and her mother. (Kimberly's mother, Patricia Moreau, died at age 48 in 1988.) "All they're looking for now is the major bones of the body, like the elbow, the knee, the hip joint, these kinds of things," Moreau says clinically, having learned over the years about decomposition rates. "We're probably looking for a piece of bone that's 3 by 3 inches - if we're lucky. But that's all we need. It's still her."
Title: Newspaper Articles #225
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:09:41 am
The Caledonian-Record

February 9, 2008

Maura Murray Still Missing - On Anniversary Of Her Disappearance

By Gary E. Lindsley

Four years ago, Maura Murray left her University of Massachusetts-Amherst campus, drove north into the White Mountains of New Hampshire and disappeared. Fred Murray, Maura's father, said it is long past time for federal authorities to enter the investigation because no progress has been made.

Police say Maura crashed a 1996 black Saturn on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill near the Weathered Barn around 7:30 p.m. Feb. 9 and either fled the scene or was picked up by someone.

They even went so far as to say she was suicidal.

During the past four years, not only has she not been seen or found, her credit card and cell phone have not been used.

Nor has her bank account. And family and friends have not heard from her.

Not even a $75,000 reward offered the latter part of 2007 by the Arkansas-based group, Let's Bring Them Home, was able to entice someone to come forward to provide any information about what happened to the then 21-year-old nursing student.

Butch Atwood, then a First Student school bus driver who happened upon Murray's car not far from his house while on his way home, said he had spoken with her and offered to get her help, but she asked him not to contact police. Atwood said she told him she had already contacted AAA.

Atwood then drove to his house, parked his bus and went to his house to call 911. He then went back to his bus to do paperwork. Less than 10 minutes later, he said Sgt. Cecil Smith of the Haverhill Police Department came to the door of his bus and asked if he had seen someone at the car. Murray had disappeared.

What is puzzling to Murray's family and friends is police did not notify Murray's family about the crash until nearly 24 hour later … and conducted a search, led by Fish and Game, 36 hours later.

They said Smith told them he thought the driver of the Saturn was Murray's father, to whom the car was registered.

They want to know why he asked neighbors the night of the crash, "Where was the girl?"

Because of the way the investigation has been handled by Haverhill police, the state police and even the state's major crimes unit, Fred Murray wants outside law enforcement involvement. He cannot fathom why police will not bring the FBI and its resources into the investigation.

"I think it is time for the feds to take a look," he said. "Of course, I wanted that to happen in the beginning, but the state police said they could handle it. They couldn't. It's four years later ... time for someone else to take a crack at it."

Four years later, Murray is still torn about finding out what happened to his daughter. He has spent endless, countless hours searching the rural, wooded areas of Grafton County.

"Every time I come out of the woods, I am relieved," he said. "I have been hanging onto an impossible dream [of finding her alive]."

In talking Thursday night about the lack of movement after the $75,000 reward did not turn up any worthwhile information, he believes at least one key element is in play.

"People are in fear of the dirt bags," Murray said. "It is time for someone to stand up. People, I think, are living on the edge of fear. Maura had an accident in the wrong area."

He believes if Maura's accident had happened in Massachusetts, professionals would have investigated it and the case would be closed.

Jeffrey Strelzin, a New Hampshire senior assistant attorney general, said Thursday afternoon Maura's disappearance is still an open case.

"Obviously, we have not determined what happened to Miss Murray," Strelzin said. "We are still receiving information about Miss Murray. It is being followed up on."

He said he could not comment about the information nor say whether it was viable. He did say it was a criminal investigation.

"It is fair to say the longer a person is missing, the more likely [she] has fallen to foul play," Strelzin said.

He said the investigation is still being led by state police Troop F in conjunction with the state's major crimes unit. He also said "hundreds of thousands" of man hours have been spent on the case.

Helena Murray, one of Maura's relatives, is surprised, like Fred, that the $75,000 reward for information did not lead to any useful tips or information.

"It's getting harder and harder," said Helena Murray, who is the administrator of the Web site, www.mauramurraymissing.com, which was formed in November 2006. The forum currently has nearly 200 registered users from all parts of the country and Canada. "We had hoped the reward would have brought someone forward, but it did not happen."

Anyone with information about Maura is asked to call the Investigative Services Bureau Major Crimes Unit … Missing Persons, Lt. Mark Mudgett, at 603-271-2663. For anonymous tips, call 1-866-479-5284.
Title: Newspaper Articles #226
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:10:10 am
The Patriot Ledger

February 9, 2008

A sense of loss always there; Weymouth father of missing woman will again comb New Hampshire woods where his daughter disappeared four years ago

Hanson - Fred Murray will be up in New Hampshire this Saturday, making a trip that any parent would dread.

Murray, of Weymouth, is looking for his daughter, Maura, who was 21 on Feb. 9, 2004, the night her car skidded off Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H. It was the last reported sighting of the young woman.

I want to think she is still alive. I have to think that," Murray said of his daughter. "Until I know otherwise, I have to think that."

Maura Murray, a Hanson native and University of Massachusetts student, apparently struck a snowbank and some trees with her car that night four years ago.

Police have long treated her disappearance as a missing person case, while family members have been steadfast in their belief that Maura was the victim of foul play.

Fred Murray and Maura's mother, Laurie Murray of Hanson, both said that there are no new leads in the case.

"Four years, and not a trace of her. No clue," Laurie Murray said.

Maura Murray left her dormitory at the UMass-Amherst campus on Feb. 9 and drove to New Hampshire for reasons that are still unclear.

By the time police arrived at the accident scene, there was no trace of her. One witness said that he had seen her, but only for a moment.

Fred Murray is still trying to get the New Hampshire State Police to release their records in the case.

One, in particular, is the report of the State Police officer who was at the crash scene that evening," Murray said. "He was riding around that area, and there is no accounting for what he saw, what he didn't see, or where he went."

Murray said it is important for him to see that report because we are trying to recreate the timeline, of what may have happened to Maura that night.

Murray added that he would still like the FBI to get involved in the case, because I want someone to get a fresh look at it. But that agency won't join the investigation, he said, unless the New Hampshire authorities ask them to.

The FBI offered to come in, but they were rebuffed, Murray said.

Attempts to reach New Hampshire State Police Lt. John Scarinza, the investigator in charge of the case, were unsuccessful.

Laurie Murray said that her daughter's disappearance is still painful. It is mental torture, every day.

She is convinced Maura was abducted. That is my personal feeling. And I do believe she is alive - and I do believe that she will come home.

Fred Murray said the pain of wondering about a missing child is constant.

The sense of loss is always there, always with you, he said. When you wake up in the morning, within 10 seconds you are aware of it.

So he will drive around Haverhill, N.H., today and once again head into the woods to look for any signs of Maura.

When I come out of the woods and I have not found anything, there is a sense of relief, Murray said. It keeps alive that slim flicker. I don't want to find her dead.
Title: Newspaper Articles #227
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:10:32 am
The Caledonian-Record

February 11, 2008

Remembering Maura

by Gary E. Lindsley

Remembering Maura - Fred Murray takes a moment Saturday afternoon to remember his daughter, Maura Murray, who disappeared Feb. 9, 2004, after having a minor car accident near the tree he is standing at off Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H. Fred placed a new ribbon and picture of his daughter on the tree.

Photo by Gary E. Lindsley
Title: Newspaper Articles #228
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:11:20 am
Journal Opinion

February 13, 2008

Four Years Have Now Passed

By Kelly White

Though four years have now passed, the location and date of Maura Murray's disappearance are still etched in the memory of North Country residents: Route 112 in Haverhill on Feb. 9, 2004.

It is a mystery what happened to Murray after the 21-year-old woman crashed her car and disappeared. And four years of searches, investigations and speculation have seen leads turn to dead ends and a family and small New Hampshire town get caught in the middle of a tragic mystery. After four years of speculation about the Maura Murray case, the law enforcement agencies involved want to speak out about the investigation and assure the public that procedures and policies that are used for any investigation were followed in the Maura Murray case.

Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams always strives to get the focus back to what is the most important question in this case, "Where is Maura Murray?"

In an interview, Williams took the opportunity to remind the public of the facts from the original case. For Williams, it is important to note that the Haverhill Police Department as well as all the law enforcement involved, handled the investigation according to regular procedure and protocol from day one. And he says that the investigation has been handled properly since Haverhill Police Department responded to the initial calls about a car accident in Swiftwater.

Williams said that Haverhill Police Department did all they could the night of the accident. Standard procedures were followed and photographs and documentation were made of everything that they found that night. The only thing he said he wished was different that night was that they could have made contact with the Murray family the night of the accident.

Lt. John Scarinza of the New Hampshire State Police added that the combined law enforcement agencies have put in thousands of man hours on this case with no cost spared to find Maura Murray and he added that all agencies have worked well together and within standard policies and procedures expected of them.

As part of an interview with Williams, the Haverhill Police Department provided the following timeline of the early stages of the investigation into the car accident:

On Feb. 9 at 7:29p.m., a 911 call was placed by residents on Wild Ammonoosuc Road about a motor vehicle accident. At 7:46 p.m., Grafton County Dispatch received a call that Sgt. Cecil Smith arrived at the scene. Smith found the vehicle locked and without a driver. He had dispatch run the license plate for the black 1996 Saturn 4-door. He was informed that the car was owned by Fred Murray of Weymouth, MA.

During the first stages of the investigation into the accident, photographs were taken of tire tracks in the snow leading into a stand of trees on the side of the road and showed that the vehicle struck the trees with enough impact to deploy both airbags. Williams noted that taking photographic evidence and documentation at the scene of an accident are standard operating procedure.

Smith later began to question neighbors about the accident. After questioning a school bus driver who stopped to inquire if Maura needed assistance, Smith learned that a woman in her 20's had been seen at the vehicle. According to a statement given the police, the witness stated the woman's speech was slurred and she had to hold on to something while she stood. "She begged me not to call police," according to the witness' statement.

While still on scene, Smith requested that Grafton County Dispatch call the residence listed with the car's registration and to inform local hospitals to be on the lookout for a young woman with a description supplied by one of the witnesses. This broadcast was put out to responding units and the dispatch center called Fred Murray's residence in Massachusetts and left a message. At 7:57 p.m., according to Grafton County Dispatch, Woodsville's Fire Rescue Pumper Truck arrived with the department's officers. They were holding a monthly meeting when they received a call about a car accident in Swiftwater.

They first cleared the car of any leaking fluids. Woodsville Fire Chief Brad Kennedy said that it is standard procedure with any vehicle accident called in to 911 that fire rescue are dispatched autimatically. There is only one person authorized to turn around a fire department responding to a call-the fire chief.

Once it was ascertained that the driver of the vehicle was not at the scene, Haverhill Police Department, New Hampshire State Police, fire and EMS personnel along with several neighbors began a brief search of the area surrounding Route 112 and Bradley Hill Road.

A local towing company was called in to remove the vehicle, which according to Williams is part of police policy to impound and store in locked facilities any and all evidence. Upon removal of the vehicle from the accident scene, Smith retrieved a Coca-Cola soda bottle with a strong odor of alcohol which was filed as evidence.

At 9:26 p.m., Smith was dispatched to Pike and left the area. Later that evening, at 11 p.m., Smith made a second attempt to phone the residence of Fred Murray, owner of the vehicle, listed on the Department of Motor Vehicle records. He left a second message that the Haverhill Police Department needed to speak with the car's owner.

About the same time, at 11 p.m., Cpl. Byron Charles and Officer Mac Cashin assisted Smith in the accident investigation as well as working on securing a search warrant for the black 1996 Saturn that was now impounded.

The following day on Feb 10, at 9:30 a.m., a search warrant was issued by Judge Timothy McKenna of Haverhill District Court to search the impounded black 1996 Saturn. Charles and Cashin then completed a search of the vehicle.

At approximately 1:30 p.m., a be-on-the-lookout (BOL) communique was issued throughout Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts for Maura Murray.

At 3:30 p.m., Smith returned to duty and called Weymouth Police Department requesting they check the residence listed on the DMV information. They still had not heard from Fred Murray. Weymouth PD instead directed Smith to contact Laurie Murray's phone number.

At 3:40 p.m., Smith spoke to Laurie Murray who informed him that the black Saturn belonged to her ex-husband Fred Murray but is driven by their daughter Maura. Laurie gave Smith the number to Maura's cell phone and to her dorm at the University of Massachusetts. Right after that conversation, Smith again tried Fred Murray's phone number and left another message. He also spoke with Hanson Police Department again at 3:51 p.m.

Smith called Maura Murray's sister, Kathleen Murray at 4:40 p.m. requesting a photo of Maura. Kathleen said she would email one to Haverhill Police Department.

At 6 p.m., Grafton County Dispatch was contacted by Fred Murray. And at 7 p.m., Smith called the University of Massachusetts (UM) campus security and requested that they check Maura Murray's dorm room.

Smith was able to speak to Fred Murray at 8 p.m. on Feb. 10. In the initial, official police statement, Fred Murray stated that his daughter, Maura, was depressed and he was fearful for her safety. He informed Smith that she had an accident in Hadley, MA on Feb.7, 2004, wrecking another vehicle of his and totaling thousands of dollar's worth of damage.

Murray told Smith that he hoped Maura wasn't doing the "old squaw walk" which Murray explained was something the two of them often joked about. The squaw walk referred to when it came time for the old Indians to die, they would walk off into the woods and die. Fred Murray requested that HPD call in the FBI, state police and a search began immediately for his daughter.

At 8.25 p.m., Haverhill Police called fish and game authorities to advise of them of a missing person situation and possible search as it had just become apparent that they may have an endangered/missing person.

Haverhill Police Department received a call at 8:40 p.m. from UM campus security to report Maura Murray's belongings were all packed in her dorm room. Campus security had evidence that she was last seen Sunday morning by a fellow student and that she was carrying a backpack, box of wine and a large hockey bag of beer. Fish and game informed the HPD at 9 p.m. that if the driver was not located by the morning of Feb 11, they would begin a search at daylight.

The next day on Feb 11, fish and game officers, state police, local police, along with family and friends of Maura Murray began one of the first of many searches at the Wild Ammonoosuc Road accident site.

Williams said he contacted the FBI early on and he, the FBI, New Hampshire State Police and UM campus security all met in Keene to confer about the investigation.

After four years of searches and heartache, no answers have been found. It is heart-wrenching for family members, friends and the community where the accident occurred that Maura's whereabouts are not known.

Still, the investigation continues and it will remain open until Maura Murray is found. Scarinza said that there is still the possibility that someday this could possibly become a criminal case.

"If that is where the evidence leads us," he said. "There has been such a push by some to have the case become open to the public. This would totally jeopardize any good investigation done by all agencies involved and who, in reality, would that serve justice to? Certainly not Miss Maura Murray." If you have any information about Maura Murray or the night of the accident, please contact NHSP Troop F at xxxxxxx or the Haverhill Police Department at XXXXXXX

Note: Transcriber does not have possession of the original. This is a copy of posts made at Topix and archived here https://mmt01.neocities.org/p419.html?fbclid=IwAR2T7nY9tN3B7vgeDTE9GU9as_Jpp5MFeoWItoSY7WfcdW2LoPlSvhEBW5w. Date derived from 2-20-2018 article, author verified personally with transcriber.

Discussion is here: https://mauramurray.createaforum.com/archive-of-prior-analysis-and-discussion/discussion-article-from-journal-opinion-4-years-passed-(approximately-february-2/
Title: Newspaper Articles #229
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:11:52 am
Journal Opinion

February 20, 2008

Regaining perspective

By Journal Opinion Staff

It's been over four years since a single car accident on a winter evening on Route 112 in Swiftwater precipitated the disappearance of Maura Murray.

It's easy to forget that to those unfamiliar with our region, but who have become enrapt with the details of the missing woman's case, Haverhill and Grafton County are viewed almost solely through the lens of Maura's case. And for many that view has been less than flattering as Fred Murray's lawsuit against local and state law enforcement agencies has wound though the court system and no answers to the mystery have been provided.

Certainly, the implications of the case are not frivolous and the action poses an interesting legal question: To what extent should a family have access to information collected as part of the search for their daughter, their niece, their sibling, their loved one?

But we're stuck by Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams' words as he redirected our attention in a piece we published last week. "Williams always strives to get the focus back to what is the most important question in this case," Kelly A. While wrote in the article. "'Where is Maura Murray ?"' On behalf of the defendants in the suit, Attorney General Kelly Ayotte has responded that those records could become the basis of a future criminal investigation in which case confidentiality is of paramount concern. While a plausible explanation, it is easy to see how the Murray family`s frustration mounts as the perception increases that no progress is being made into determining Maura's whereabouts and no criminal charges are forthcoming.

But litigation has also posed distractive and in some ways diminished attention to the search for Maura.

The incessant media attention has no doubt worn Swiftwater residents and their neighbors thin, and it is not easily forgotten for them that a young woman is still missing.

But for the rest of us, we need to remember the important question; Where is Maura Murray?

After all, searching needs focus.

Original https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MHYFfqWa7HNidD9WSDP8L590GEhwOxzG/view?usp=sharing
Title: Newspaper Articles #230
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:12:30 am
Mauramurraymissing.com

July 2008

Our sincere thanks to those who gave up their holiday weekend!!

Press Release:

This past Friday and Saturday a group of licensed private investigators from NH, VT and MA, along with K-9 teams from as far as Connecticut searched wooded areas in Haverhill, NH in search of Maura Murray.

Maura went missing in February of 2004 after a minor automobile accident on Rte 112 and has not been seen since.

The family reached out to the Molly Bish Foundation a couple of years ago and since that time a group of private investigators has been working the case pro bono. This weekend's search was the third ground searched performed by the team for Maura's case.

As information was developed just three weeks prior to the search, our usually sources of housing for the teams was not available. Local private investigator Nanci Mahoney, who was not part of the Maura Murray Task Force, donated her townhouse and obtained her neighbor's townhouse to house all the K-9 teams and some of the investigators as well as providing a home made breakfast for all Saturday at 5:30am.

Shannon Door owners Tom and Tess Mulkern donated the Friday night meal for the teams. Betty Jane Newton donated a case of "Doggie Yogurt" for our K-9 partners and Starbucks Manager Kim Elliot donated the Saturday morning coffee.

Without the kindness of these people this weekend could not have happened.

On behalf of Maura's family, the Molly Bish Foundation, the K-9 teams and investigators I want to take this opportunity to sincerely thank all of those who assisted us.
Title: Newspaper Articles #231-Part 1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:13:27 am
ABC News

20/20

August 14, 2008

(1 of 3)

By Donna Hunter

Vanished: Two Coeds, Two Horrifying Mysteries - What Happened to Brooke Wilberger and Maura Murray?

March 17, 2006 -- It's one of the most exciting times of a young adult's life: starting college and moving out of mom and dad's nest to a place of one's own. But too often for young people, particularly young women, that newfound independence is coupled with dangerous vulnerability.

Figures gathered by the FBI say there are over 21,500 active missing person cases involving people between the ages of 18 and 29. Brooke Wilberger and Maura Murray are two young women included in that tragic statistic. Their stories powerfully illustrate how communities can rally and families' faith and hope get tested when a loved one has vanished.

Brooke and Maura's stories are similar in many ways. Both were smart, beautiful young women with loving friends and family. They were active in their communities. They had boyfriends who adored them. They were on the verge of very bright futures. Then they disappeared.

Community Rallies to Search for Brooke

The story of Brooke Wilberger's disappearance begins on the afternoon of May 24, 2004. The 19-year-old Brigham Young University student was home in Oregon visiting her family, and helping out her sister and brother-in-law at an apartment complex they manage in the town of Corvallis.

Corvallis is a picturesque Oregon city of about 54,000 people. It's a place most people would consider ideal for raising a family. But even idyllic places can be visited by crime. "The city of Corvallis is really safe, but we're also in the real world," said Lt. Ron Noble of the Corvallis Police Department.

Brooke was in the parking lot of the complex cleaning lamp posts. When Brooke didn't show up for lunch, her sister, Stephani Hansen, began to worry.

Brooke's car keys and purse were in their apartment. Her car was in the lot. Her flip-flops were found, but Brooke was gone.

"I got very nervous -- we had exhausted every possibility, we had searched all the apartments that she could possibly be working in. We looked everywhere -- then we called the police," her sister recalled.

Lt. Noble remembers receiving the call about the case. "Normally, we would wait. Because adults can come and go as they please and we would normally wait to see if she showed up maybe the next day," he said. But police officials agreed with Brooke's sister; they sensed Brooke was not the sort of young woman to disappear on her own.

"It was amazing to us that they acted that fast, and I think one of the reasons was when they immediately did a quick check, [they saw] Brooke was a great kid," said her mom, Cammy Wilberger.

As their search began, police eliminated one usual suspect in similar cases -- the boyfriend.

The man in Brooke's life, Justin Blake, who had dated Brooke since high school, was doing Morman missionary work in Venezuela.

Marriage was on the horizon for the couple, he said. "I was gonna propose. We just both sort of knew what was gonna happen when I got back from my mission," he said.

His parents called him in Venezuela to deliver the news that would shatter those plans. "They just started crying when they heard my voice and so I just started crying," he recalled.

In Corvallis, a community-wide search effort had been organized with unusual speed.

"The community of Corvallis was wonderful. That first night they had hundreds of people helping search," Brooke's mother recalled. "Our church organized it, but everyone in the community filled in," she said.

"There were a lot of areas to search and some of it very, very heavy with heavy vegetation. In fact, I remember going home at 1 o'clock in the morning and there were still 300 people doing concentric circles from where Brooke was last seen," said Lt. Noble. The first night ended with no sign of Brooke.

In the morning, the townsfolk of Corvallis would awake to a shock of another sort - the largest gathering of media the town had ever seen.
Title: Newspaper Articles #231-Part 2
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:14:07 am
ABC News

20/20

August 14, 2008

(2 of 3)

By Donna Hunter

"We had to operate on a whole different paradigm for this investigation, because we didn't have anything to go on. So we needed the media to stay here to talk about the case so people would call in tips," Lt. Noble said. Despite the authorities' quick response, the community support and national media coverage, it was years before there was a real break in the case.

Was Maura Murray Abducted, or Did She Run Away?

Brooke was 19 when she disappeared and police began investigating immediately, but that's not always the case. With missing persons over the age of 18, police are very likely to wait a few days because, authorities tell us, adults have a right to disappear.

Authorities followed that procedure in the case of 22-year-old Maura Murray, who went missing Feb. 9, 2004, after she was in a minor car accident in New Hampshire.

Authorities believed she may have wanted to disappear, but her family and friends were certain her disappearance was not by her own choice.

Like Brooke, Maura was an excellent student. Before attending nursing school at the University of Massachusetts, she had attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where she met a young man, Bill Rausch, and fell in love. After Rausch graduated West Point, he was stationed in Oklahoma as Maura finished school in Massachusetts. But that distance only seemed to deepen their commitment to each other.

Shocked and upset, Rausch called his parents after learning that Maura had gone missing. "I answered the phone, and I heard panic in his voice," his mom, Sharon Rausch, said.

But there were immediate questions surrounding Maura's disappearance. For reasons she apparently shared with no one, the 22-year-old left her dorm in Massachusetts and drove to New Hampshire.

Reporter Joe McGee, covered the story for The Patriot Ledger in Quincy, Mass. "At a hairpin turn, she went off the road. Her car hit a tree. At that point, a person came along who was driving a bus. It was a neighbor. He asked her if she needed help, she refused. About 10 minutes later, police showed up to the scene and Maura Murray was gone," McGee said.

News of that night's events reached Maura's father, Fred Murray, when police called at 4 p.m. the next day.

"My immediate reaction when I found out that my daughter was missing was right at the edge of panic. You found her car? She was in an accident? She's not there? Where is she? Where is the search now? You know, how far have you looked now? And and as it turns out, there was no search," he said.

In this case, the initial conclusion at the scene was that Maura had probably left on her own free will. But a day and a half later, with still no sign of her, authorities investigated further.

"They brought out helicopters, ground crews to search the area and dogs. But two things stood out. No. 1, there were no footprints left in the snow. And No. 2, dogs lost her scent about 100 yards away from the scene," The Patriot Ledger's McGee said.

Police reported that there were no signs of struggle at the scene, and their conclusion seemed to be that she had run away.

Maura's boyfriend doesn't believe the woman he planned to marry would simply run away. He got an emergency leave from the Army to search for Maura. "I kept hearing, well, she's an adult, and I was the only one out there walking up and down the street, looking over snowbanks, trying to find footprints, trying to find some sign of her," he said.

Rausch's parents were devastated by Murray's disappearance. "For all of us that love Maura, life is like a nightmare. I can honestly say that I can't imagine loving anyone that's not my child anymore than I love Maura," Sharon Rausch said.

Wilberger Family Offers Support, Maura's Father Presses On

Three months later, as the fact of Maura's disappearance lingered without answers, her family saw reports of another missing young woman -- Brooke Wilberger.

Sharon Rausch saw how Wilberger's community rallied around the family and joined the search, and she wanted similar action for her son's missing girlfriend.

The two families began to share e-mails. "We talked about our faith in God and that we would not give up hope and that Brooke and Maura were in God's hands," Rausch said.

Maura's father was angered by the lack of progress on the case, and complained that authorities had made up their mind that his daughter had run away and were not devoting enough attention to her disappearance.

"I don't agree with some of his observations, but I understand certainly his frustration in not knowing what happened to his daughter," said Lt. John Scarinza, commander of the New Hampshire State Police Troop F.

"It's clear to us that it was her intention to at least get away for a certain amount of time," Lt. Scarinza said, noting that his department investigates cases in which people come to the New Hampshire mountains to get away from their problems several times a year, "sometimes with the intention of harming themselves."

But that scenario still makes no sense to Maura's father. "She didn't just wander into the woods to try to commit suicide. She has everything to live for. She was going to graduate in June into a nursing career. She was about to get engaged," he said.

However, Maura's family and closest friends have no idea what drew her to that lonely New Hampshire road. And they were surprised at some of the things police and reporters discovered.

"She took a lot of belongings and didn't tell anybody where she was going other than e-mails she sent to a professor saying that there had been a death in the family and that she needed to leave unexpectedly. And then she headed north," said reporter Joe McGee.

Regardless of what brought Maura to that remote area, her father wants to know where she is now. Most weekends he travels from Massachusetts to the New Hampshire spot where Maura slid off the road and into a tree.

He has gone to the state capitol and met with the governor in a closed-door meeting, demanding answers about the investigation. His confrontations with the police and state officials, and his constant prowling around New Hampshire, raised speculation in some quarters that he was becoming kind of a nutty nuisance.

But Murray's relentless pursuit for answers caught the attention of Tom Shamshak, a former police chief and member of a group of private investigators who offer pro bono help in situations that capture their interest. In January they took on Maura Murray's case.

Shamshak and his colleagues looked at the case with a fresh set of eyes. Based on their investigation, Shamshak said, "It appears, just based on what I have reviewed with the other investigators from New Hampshire, Maine and Vermont that are part of the team, that this is something beyond a mere missing persons case. Something ominous could have happened here."

Watch "20/20" tonight at 10 p.m. to learn of the latest developments in the cases. There are devastating answers for the Brooke Wilberger's family, and an equally painful lack of answers for Maura Murray's family.
Title: Newspaper Articles #231-Part 3
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:14:31 am
ABC News

20/20

August 14, 2008

(3 of 3)

Vanished: Two Coeds, Two Horrifying Mysteries What Happened to Brooke Wilberger and Maura Murray?

By DONNA HUNTER

Four years after the disappearance of two young coeds, their families are still searching for answers. Where are their daughters? Who took them?

The family of a missing Oregon teen face the reality that she may not come home.The families of Brooke Wilberger and Maura Murray have forged an unlikely bond since the college students vanished within three months of each other in 2004.

Now police are targeting a convicted sex offender in Wilberger's disappearance, but there is not yet a suspect in Murray's case.

For more information on the latest developments in the cases, watch the story tonight on "20/20" at 10 p.m. ET

The two women were just starting their adult lives in early 2004. But too often for young people, particularly young women, that newfound independence is coupled with dangerous vulnerability.

Figures gathered by the FBI say there are more than 21,500 active missing person cases involving people between the ages of 18 and 29. Wilberger and Murray are now included in that tragic statistic. Their stories powerfully illustrate how communities can rally, and how families' faith and hope get tested when a loved one has vanished.

Their stories are similar in many ways. Both were smart, beautiful young women with loving friends and family. They were active in their communities. They had boyfriends who adored them. They were on the verge of very bright futures. Then they disappeared.

The story of Wilberger's disappearance begins on the afternoon of May 24, 2004. The 19-year-old Brigham Young University student was home in Oregon visiting her family, and helping out her sister and brother-in-law at an apartment complex they manage in the town of Corvallis.

Corvallis is a picturesque Oregon city of about 54,000 people. It's a place most people would consider ideal for raising a family. But even idyllic places can be visited by crime.

"The city of Corvallis is really safe, but we're also in the real world," said Lt. Ron Noble of the Corvallis Police Department.

Wilberger was in the parking lot of the complex cleaning lampposts. When she didn't show up for lunch, her sister, Stephani Hansen, began to worry.

Wilberger's car keys and purse were in their apartment. Her car was in the lot. Her flip-flops were found, but she was gone.

"I got very nervous ... we had exhausted every possibility, we had searched all the apartments that she could possibly be working in. We looked everywhere. Then we called the police," her sister recalled.

Noble remembers receiving the call about the case. "Normally, we would wait. Because adults can come and go as they please and we would normally wait to see if she showed up maybe the next day," he said. But police officials agreed with Wilberger's sister, they sensed Brooke was not the sort of young woman to disappear on her own.

"It was amazing to us that they acted that fast, and I think one of the reasons was when they immediately did a quick check, [they saw] Brooke was a great kid," said her mom, Cammy Wilberger.

As their search began, police eliminated one usual suspect in similar cases -- the boyfriend.

The man in Brooke's life, Justin Blake, who had dated Wilberger since high school, was doing Mormon missionary work in Venezuela. Marriage was on the horizon for the couple, he said.
Title: Newspaper Articles #232
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:15:01 am
CNN

Wednesday November 26, 2008

Student wrecks car on snowy road, disappears

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Every weekend for more than four years, Fred Murray has walked the road where his daughter, Maura, vanished. Family, friends and volunteers help him look in the woods and mountains near Haverhill, New Hampshire, for clues to what happened to her.

Maura Murray, 21, disappeared while driving in the New Hampshire woods on a snowy night in 2004.

Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, disappeared on a cold and snowy night in February 2004. She was last known to be driving from Massachusetts through New Hampshire. It is still unclear where she was heading in her black 1996 Saturn.

The car was found abandoned, its front end crashed against a tree. It apparently had skidded off a road at a sharp curve.

Shortly after the accident, a passing bus driver stopped and asked Murray if she needed help. She said no.

Ten minutes later, police arrived. Inside the crumpled Saturn, they found some of Murray's belongings -- school books, running gear, snack foods and alcohol -- police won't say what kind. But Murray was gone, along with her car keys and a backpack she always carried.

There was nothing to hint she'd be motivated to run away, according to her fiance', William Rausch, and her father, Fred Murray.

Maura Murray had just gotten engaged to Rausch, her college sweetheart and an Army lieutenant stationed in Oklahoma. They planned to marry after she graduated from nursing school in June 2005. She'd found a summer nursing job in Oklahoma. She had everything to look forward to.

"She was in good spirits and had no worries or reason to run away from her life," Fred Murray said.

Investigators initially operated under the theory that the dean's list student was troubled and had decided to escape from the demands of her life for a while. As a result, they did not immediately begin to look for her.

The search did not begin until 39 hours after her crashed car was found. When it finally got under way, helicopters, search dogs and ground teams covered the area near where Murray's car was found.

The dogs picked up her scent for about 100 yards, leading investigators along the road to an area between two homes. There, the dogs lost the trail.

Murray's credit cards and cell phone have not registered any activity since the night she disappeared, February 9, 2004.

Tom Shamshak, a private investigator hired by the Murray family to continue the search, said police and volunteers looked for her for two days.

"No footprints were even found in the snow," he said. "Luckily there hadn't been any fresh snowfall in those two days."

Shamshak has concluded that only two scenarios could explain what happened to Murray. Either she was picked up by someone driving on the road, or she walked to a nearby house to ask for help.

Police say they did not treat Murray's case as an abduction because they saw no signs of a struggle at the scene.

Before she left campus, police learned, Murray had e-mailed her professors and informed them she'd be absent for a few days because of a death in the family. Murray's family and friends said no one in the family had died.

Police also noted that Murray had enough food and other items in her car to suggest she might be taking a short getaway vacation.

Murray is described as 5 feet 7 inches tall, 120 pounds, with brown hair and blue-green eyes. She was last seen wearing a dark coat and jeans and carrying a black backpack and Samsung cell phone.

A $40,000 reward is being offered for any information leading to her whereabouts or the arrest of the person responsible for her disappearance. The tip line is 603-271-2663, New Hampshire State Police.
Title: Newspaper Articles #233
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:15:28 am
CNN - Nancy Grace

December 9, 2008

Vermont teen vanishes on way home from work

By Rupa Mikkilineni

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Brianna Maitland was just 17, with strong ambition and a fierce independent streak, said her mother, Kellie Maitland.

Brianna Maitland was just 17 and had started a new job when she vanished on the way home from work.

When Brianna insisted on taking a job, moving out of the family nest and living on her own with a roommate before starting college, it wasn't what her parents originally had in mind for her.

She'd just begun a job as a waitress at the Black Lantern Restaurant in Montgomery, Vermont, when she vanished into the night.

Maitland left work at 11:20 p.m. on March 19, 2004, intending to go straight home to her apartment, co-workers said. She got into her car and drove off, but has not been seen or heard from since.

Three days later, her roommate called Maitland's parents, asking if they'd seen her. Alarmed, the Maitlands called the police and discovered that the car she'd been driving had been found on Saturday, the day after she was last seen.

The 1985 green Oldsmobile had been abandoned a mile from the restaurant where Maitland worked. The back end of the car was smashed into an abandoned shack.

Maitland left behind her contact lenses, prescription medication and two paychecks totaling $150 -- money that a 17-year-old would not have walked away from, said her mother. Forensic testing on the vehicle showed no signs of foul play, police said.

Once authorities linked the car to the missing teen, they brought in search teams as well as scent-tracking dogs and helicopters. More than 500 police officers and volunteers combed the woods near where Maitland's car was found, but they found no trace of her.

The case bears some similarity to the disappearance of another young woman in Vermont a month earlier. Maura Murray was driving in the snow when her car skidded off the road and was found abandoned. She, too, disappeared. Police have found no solid link but they are not ruling out a connection.

In 2006, two years after Maitland's disappearance, Vermont police had what they hoped would be a break in the case. A tipster called in a sighting of Maitland at Ceasar's Place casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Web site: bringbrihome.org

Security cameras captured a young woman resembling Maitland, but the video was grainy and Bruce and Kellie Maitland couldn't say for certain that their daughter was on the video.

Police were not able to find the girl in the video, but Kellie Maitland said, "It gives us great hope that maybe she is out there somewhere alive."

Maitland is described as 5 feet 4 inches tall, 110 pounds, with long, brown straight hair with hazel eyes. She wore a small nose ring in her left nostril and has a thin scar down her forehead to her left eyebrow.

Police and family are offering a $20,000 reward for any information leading to finding Maitland or leading to the arrest of the persons responsible for her disappearance. Please call the Vermont State Police with any tips at 802-524-5993.
Title: Newspaper Articles #234
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:16:04 am
Nashua Telegraph / Pittsfield Berkshire Eagle / Boston Globe / Boston Herald

February 8, 2009

Note: The Pittsfield Berkshire Eagle has a different headline and additional information in italics.

Boston Globe or Boston Herald difference is at end in large bold. The Lowell Sun has an additional sentence in bold and some of the additional commentary as in the Pittsfield Berkshire Eagle, where indicated.

After 5 years, few leads on missing student

Few leads on missing student

Five years later the case leaves investigators ‘befuddled’

Five years later, case frustrates family

By Beth LaMontagne Hall

The Associated Press

Concord - It’s been five years since nursing student Maura Murray, 21, vanished from the scene of a car crash in Haverhill, and investigators say they still don’t know what happened to the Massachusetts woman that night.

Murray packed up her schoolbooks and drove to northern New Hampshire on Feb. 9, 2004, eventually heading east on Route 112, a rural road that cuts through the White Mountain National Forest. She had told her friends and professors at the University of Massachusetts Amherst that she would miss a week of class because of a death in the family, but her family has said that wasn’t true.

Around 7 p.m., police received reports of a crash along the desolate road. When they arrived three to four minutes later, they found the Hanson, Mass., woman’s car with minor damage, but Murray was nowhere to be found.

“I’m totally befuddled,’’ said John Healy, president of the New Hampshire League of Investigators, a group of private investigators who’s been volunteering on the case for four years.

“The thing that is really, really tough for us, and it’s got to be tough for the state police, is the time frame. Literally, this was in a blink of an eye,” Healy said.

“Did a car stop? Did she walk away? We just don’t know that.”

The mystery has been especially hard on Murray’s family. Her father, Fred Murray, has been pushing the New Hampshire State Police and the Attorney General’s office for answers, but because the case is still under investigation, they have revealed little about what they’ve found.

“She was just 200 yards down the road when (police) got there, two minutes’ worth,” he said. “All they had to do is go grab her and they didn’t. If they did, she’d be here with me now.”

Murray has been critical of state investigators because he believes they didn’t look for Maura quickly enough and were slow to follow up on leads. They aren’t telling him what they’re doing, he said, or if any progress has been made.

------------------------------------------------------Also in Lowell Sun, except bold-------------------------------------------------------------

Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeffery Strelzin says the case is still open and active.

"There's been a lot of activity behind the scenes and the state police have put in hundreds of hundreds, if not thousands, of hours on the case, but unfortunately we don't have the answers yet," said Strelzin.

Healy, a former state police lieutenant, said investigators have not shelved the case.

------------------------------------------------------Also in Lowell Sun, except bold-------------------------------------------------------------

“Trust me, these people are working their tails off,” he said.

But Murray is frustrated after years of battling with investigators.

"I want to put it together again from the beginning, but I don't want one arm tied behind my back," said Murray. "I want the public to know that the police have been asked, 'What did your guys do?' and they won't say."

He believes if he knew what they knew, he could put together a timeline of the night and, he hopes, a clearer picture of what happened.

Strelzin said police believe Maura Murray could have essentially run away and is living elsewhere, a scenario her family does not buy.

Murray could have also been injured in the accident, wandered off into the woods and died of exposure or ran into someone who harmed her.

“I’m 100 percent certain that it’s foul play. She was supposed to call me that night. She would have if she could have, but she couldn’t,” said Murray. “It’s a question of who.”

Healy said his crew of volunteer investigators has found some possible evidence over the years, such as a human scent picked up by search dogs, but he's uncertain if it ever led to anything.

Although he continues to occasionally examine the area where Maura Murray disappeared, Healy thinks the best bet police have in solving the case is if someone new comes forward.

"One thing that I've learned is that very few people commit a crime ... without telling somebody about it somewhere," said Healy. "Human beings need to talk."
Title: Newspaper Articles #235
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:16:46 am
The Caledonian-Record

February 9, 2009

Five Years Later, Maura Murray Still Missing After Driving To Haverhill, N.H. "Nothing has changed over five years." - Fred Murray - Questions Still Remain Five Years After Maura Murray's Disappearance

Gary E. Lindsley

Five years ago today, then 21-year-old Maura Murray left her University of Massachusetts-Amherst campus, drove north into the White Mountains of New Hampshire and disappeared. After five years, Fred Murray, Maura's father, is still trying to find out what happened Feb. 9, 2004.

Police say Maura crashed a 1996 black Saturn into some trees along Route 112 in the town of Haverhill near the Weathered Barn at about 7:30 p.m.

She either fled the scene or was picked up by someone else. They said she may have been suicidal.

During the past five years, not only has she not been seen or found, her credit card and cell phone have not been used. Nor has her bank account. Family and friends have heard nothing.

Butch Atwood was a First Student school bus driver who happened upon Murray's car, not far from his house, while on his way home that night. Atwood said he spoke with Murray and offered to get her help, but that she asked him not to contact police. Atwood said Murray told him she had already contacted AAA.

Atwood then drove home, parked his bus and went inside his house to call 911. Less than 10 minutes later, he said Sgt. Cecil Smith of the Haverhill Police Department came to the door of his bus and asked if he had seen someone at the car. Murray had disappeared.

What still puzzles Murray's family and friends is that police did not notify Murray's family about the crash until nearly 24 hours later … and did begin a search for 36 hours.

Murray's family said Smith told them he thought the driver of the Saturn was Murray's father, to whom the car was registered. Mysterious to them, though, is why Smith asked neighbors, the night of the crash, "Where is the girl?"

Since 2004 Murray has wanted FBI involvement to address the mysteries of the case.

"Nothing has changed over five years," he said.

When Murray was finally notified of his missing daughter, he was relieved to learn a state police trooper was at the crash site. "The state cop is more highly trained," he said. "These are career officers."

His relief was short lived, though, after he arrived in Haverhill.

"Evidently, they had not done anything," he said. "My first question was, 'You had an officer at the scene. What did your guy say?' Five years later I have the same question. He was the best chance Maura had. Why can't they say?"

The Saturn's windshield had a spider crack in it, which Murray said might have been caused by Maura's head striking it. Also, she was in danger of hypothermia.

"She had nowhere to run, nowhere to ask for help," he said. "There has been an accident and the driver has abandoned the car. It's his [trooper's] responsibility to get the person."

Murray said when he asked New Hampshire State Police Troop F commander, Lt. John Scarinza, what his trooper had done, Scarinza looked down at his feet and said nothing.

"He said zero," Murray said. "To this day, they have not said what he did. The only guy who can pull her bacon out of the fire, he didn't do it. I want the state police to tell me what happened Feb. 9, 2004. I want to go back to square one.

When they did not answer my question … 'What did your guy do?' … my heart sank."

Accident Records

During the last five years, Murray fought all the way to the New Hampshire Supreme Court to have the accident records released. The court ruled in the attorney general's favor not to release the information.

"The judge asked the assistant attorney general what was the percentage of bringing charges, and he [Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Strelzin] rolls his eyes, looks at the floor and then says, '75 percent.' He pulled it out of his back pocket," Murray said.

"My question now to the [assistant] AG is, what is 75 percent of nothing?

You said 75 percent two years ago. You made that up. Nothing has happened," he said.

Dispatch Logs

Murray said the Grafton County dispatch logs also bother him.

"You see dispatches for the same time period and they are different," he said.

"Times and information from the dispatches are not the same, later. These are official documents. Why don't they match?"

Murray is also bewildered about why the private investigators working on Maura's disappearance have not turned over evidence they found during a search on property at Mountain Lakes Estates in October.

"I think as of last summer they had not tested it or turned it over to state police," he said.

The evidence, Murray said, is being refrigerated.

"Everything is legal," he said. "It is valid."

John Healy, president of the New Hampshire League of Investigators, said in an e-mail, "We are still active.

We did a search last July, our third. We brought a medium up to the area last week. This one is the real deal, has done this before and first told us so much about ourselves it was scary. We passed her observations on to the police."

Healy said his group would meet again later this month to get back on track.

"We are in this for the long haul," he said. "The observation of the psychic and dog handlers from the search were given to the state police. Since it is oneway communication, we do not know if we found anything useful, but they were interested in our findings and asked for them."

Wants FBI Involved

Because of what he perceives is a lack of movement on the case, Murray is again calling for the FBI to be involved.

Maura's trip Feb. 9, 2004, took her through three states, Massachusetts, Vermont and New Hampshire.

"Plus, you have her marching into the federal forest," he said. "You have three states and federal property. The FBI should enter the case because of irregularities. The FBI should enter because of the amount of violence in the area.

"Firemen ask for help when they can't put a fire out," Murray said. "But firemen aren't hiding anything."

Helena Murray, who is one of Maura's relatives and is the site administrator for mauramurraymissing.com, has not given up in her search for Maura.

"It's a long time," she said. "It's unbelievable to me. It's five years and my heart goes out to Fred and Laurie. I don't know how people do it. You want to have hope, but there is nothing. I don't think she is still with us."

Strelzin did not return several telephone calls last week; Scarinza was unavailable for comment; and Haverhill police are referring any questions about Maura's disappearance to state police.

Photo By Gary E. Lindsley

Fred Murray hangs a new bow on a tree Saturday near where his daughter, Maura, crashed her car on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., Feb. 9, 2004.
Title: Newspaper Articles #236
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:17:19 am
Fox44

February 9, 2009

NH Residents Move On From Murray Case

By Brandon Hudson

It's been five years since Maura Murray's disappearance and people still don't know what happened.

In 2004, investigators say Murray was driving east on Route 112 when she crashed into a tree in Haverill, New Hampshire. When police when to check out the wreck, she was gone.

Now the site, where she was last seen, is marked with a dark blue ribbon and her picture to keep her memory strong.

People living in the area say the case isn't talked about much anymore, but they have a solution as to what they think happened.

"There's so many stories about it," Lyme resident Mike Whitcomb said. "My personal opinion is her and her father didn't get along and she wanted to be out of town."

Whitcomb said folks are trying to put the case behind them.

"I think people are looking to move on right now," Whitcomb said.

Authorities say the case is still open. They aren't saying what happened but hope someone new will provide information.
Title: Newspaper Articles #237
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:17:51 am
Patriot Ledger / Eagle Tribune

February 17, 2009

NH lawmaker proposes cold case unit Officials seeking federal stimulus cash for program

By James A. Kimble

CONCORD - A proposed cold case homicide unit would target New Hampshire’s 100 unsolved murders, some on the books since 1969.

Rep. Peyton Hinkle, R-Merrimack, has filed a bill he’s been working on for four years, inspired by the unsolved killings of two young girls in the Candia woods in 1973.

"What we need is detectives who can work on these cases," Hinkle said. "I think it is possible to get something done."

Hinkle isn’t alone in that sentiment. Even with the sober realities of the state budget crisis, the assistant commissioner of the Department of Safety hopes there may be federal stimulus money to start up a four-person unit.

"If something like that comes forward, then we might be able to see it come to pass," Assistant Commissioner Earl Sweeney said.

"Our first priority is to keep troopers on the road. The governor has been very kind to us and I think we are going to be able to avoid layoffs in troopers. Having said that, at some point, we would like to have a unit like that."

Sweeney said state police detectives work cold cases when time allows.

Lately, that’s been rare. In the past two years, the state has prosecuted its first two capital murder cases in decades, along with other cases that had multiple defendants.

Hinkle proposes assigning two state police detectives to the cold case unit, along with a paralegal and a prosecutor from the state attorney general’s office who would work part time for the unit.

The Department of Safety estimates the unit would have a startup cost of $221,322, and an additional $62,602 for the attorney general’s office.

Creation of the unit also could mean more forensic testing. Sweeney said another bill in the works which would require collection of DNA samples from all felons would enhance the ability to find murder suspects who have committed other crimes.

In 2007, Kenneth Dion was an inmate at New Hampshire State Prison when Alaska State Police determined he was the man responsible for the 1994 killing of Bonnie Craig, an 18-year-old college student.

Alaska State Police had no knowledge of Dion until his DNA sample matched semen found on the dead woman’s body. Time will tell whether Hinkle can draw enough support from fellow lawmakers and the public to establish the cold case unit.

There is no hearing date set for the bill. "I think there’s family members for a lot of these victims who would like to testify," Hinkle said.

He hopes to draw support from Maine, which last year assigned a state prosecutor to work part time exclusively on cold cases. Word of Hinkle’s proposal is welcome news to Kingston police Chief Donald Briggs.

State police had been assisting his department in the March 1980 murder of Rachel Garden, a 15-year-old girl who disappeared after leaving a convenience store in Newton.

Police have searched local ponds and dug around various sites in recent months, working on new tips as they get them, Briggs said. But working on cold cases is a matter of having the resources to do it, the chief said.

"Having a unit like that would be very helpful to us, especially in the Rachel Garden case," he said.

With a plethora of TV shows and crime fiction focused on unsolved murders, many people assume cold case units already exist in New Hampshire.

"We definitely get those questions, ’Do you guys have a cold case squad?’ And when we say no, people are surprised," said Jeff Strelzin, senior assistant attorney general. Strelzin said his office routinely works on unsolved cases, but it’s done either when new information comes to light or as time allows. If a unit was developed, Strelzin said, its first task would likely be to cull the solvable cases from the 100 or so that are on the books.

With the passage of time, it’s possible witnesses and prime suspects die before an arrest is made, Strelzin said. "Whenever we pull up an old case, one thing we look at is whether our witnesses are around anymore," he said. "It may be that less than half of those cases are in the solvable category." The attorney general’s office recently won convictions in two 20-year-old homicides. In 2006, a jury convicted George Knickerbocker of manslaughter for shaking to death 5-week-old Adam Robbins in February 1983. The case remained an unsolved Concord murder until his arrest in 2002. Also in 2006, Eric Windhurst pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for killing his friend’s stepfather in November 1985. Strelzin said his office has recently been working on a 30-year-old homicide. Hinkle proposes starting the unit out small, giving it a two-year shelf life and making it accountable to top government officials. The group would issue an annual report on its results to the governor, House speaker and Senate president. "People say we don’t have the resources to investigate these cases," Hinkle said. "I don’t understand why we don’t. We seem to have money to spend on a lot of other things that aren’t as necessary. This has to do with a fundamental part of government, which is public safety and justice. I don’t know why we don’t put them ahead of other things."
Title: Newspaper Articles #238
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:18:24 am
Nashua Telegraph

March 9, 2009

Troubled histories - State is considering unit for unsolved police cases - Bill calls for two state police detectives to look into unsolved cases

By Karen Lovett

Merrimack - Pete Hinkle never knew Diane Compagna or her friend, Anne Psaradelis.

But now he knows their story.

In the summer of 1973, the two Merrimack teens went missing. They were later found dead in a wooded area in Candia.

The now 35-year-old unsolved murder of the two Merrimack teens was shoved back into the spotlight two years ago, when former Merrimack police Detective Joseph Horak published two books about the case,which he has continued investigating long into his retirement.

Through news reports of Horak’s work, Hinkle learned about Compagna and Psaradelis. Hinkle said he then listened to Horak speak at a local book signing in 2007. The two met personally some time ago.

“Everything he said - the dates, times, places, information - was very consistent,” Hinkle said. “I thought there must be something to this.”

They talked about the whole case, Hinkle said, which drove him to connect with a state police detective about the case’s status, and to set up a meeting with the attorney general. “If they were to take the case to the grand jury, they’d need good evidence for it to be worthwhile, and they alerted me to this,” Hinkle said. “It just seemed a matter of the state not having resources to devote to cold cases.”

It was last summer’s break in a decades-old Maine killing that spurred Hinkle to further action. Police tracked down Roger Bernier at his Manchester apartment, connecting him to a 22-year old strangulation of a Portland woman.

It occurred lo Hinkle: maybe, after all this time, something will have changed to bring the Compagna/Psaradelis case closer to being solved.

“We may have some people who have knowledge of the murder,” Hinkle said. “Or people who’ve felt threatened, but now feel safe, (who) might testify or provide information.” Hinkle also learned of the dozens of other cold cases in New Hampshire, which motivated him to investigate establishing a cold case unit.

“It is in the state’s interest for our good image to do see that we do something about these cases,” Hinkle said, adding that he felt for the families of the deceased. “This is the shame of it: They just don’t get any answers.”

Hinkle filed the bill last fall. It calls for hiring two state police detectives and a paralegal in the Department of Safety, plus an attorney and assistant in the justice department.

All told, the bill would require just over $280,000 in the first year, with costs going up slightly in 2011.

Rep. Dick Hindi, R-Merrimack, said while the economy is difficult, he would support the bill and some kind of funding. “I believe this comes right up there and should have a high priority to it,” Hinch said.

Hinkle said his understanding is that New Hampshire may get $10 million in stimulus money for law enforcement purposes, something the state could tap into for a cold case unit.

Grants m ay also be available, Hinkle said, and there may be a way to cobble together a solution with help from Lynch’s proposed belt-tightening measures, such as closing prisons.

Since filing the legislation, Hinkle said he’s fielded several calls from families who support a cold case unit, including 21-year-old Maura Murray, a Bay State resident who went missing in 2004 after a minor car crash in Haverhill, N.H.; Kathy Lynn Gloddy, who at 13 was raped, beaten, run over by a car in Franklin in 1971; and Molly Bish, a 16-year-old Massachusetts girl who was abducted while on duty as a lifeguard in 2000. He thinks there could be a strong showing from some of those folks and more at hearing on the bill, scheduled in Concord for Tuesday.

“I think it’s important that we provide the resources to bring closure to all of these cases,” Hinch said. In the meantime, the New Hampshire Department of Safety has taken no official position on the bill, but several investigators in the State Police Major Crimes Unit, which handles murders, said they are all for it.

“We would love to be able to have enough personnel and the resources to have a cold case unit,” Sgt. Steven Rowland said. “It’s something we feel is essentially needed.”

The state’s Attorney General’s office also has taken no position on the bill, and the head of that agency’s homicide unit, Senior Assistant Attorney General Jeff Strelzin, declined to opine on it himself.

“We’ll obviously follow whatever the law is,” he said. People often assume New Hampshire has a cold case unit, Strelzin said, but in reality very few law enforcement agencies do, and very many would say they could use one, he said.

“I think a lot of those agencies would tell you they don’t have enough resources to keep up with their current cases, never mind going backwards,” Strelzin said.

New Hampshire law enforcement never lets cases go entirely cold, however, Strelzin said.

“We always work on unsolved cases,” Strelzin said, though he added, “They (police) are probably right that the vast majority of their time is spent on current cases.”

Karen Lovett can be reached at 594-6402 or klovett@nashuatelegraph.com. Andrew Wolfe contributed to this report.
Title: Newspaper Articles #239
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:19:01 am
The Caledonian-Record

March 19, 2009

Brianna Maitland Not Forgotten - Police: She May Be Victim Of Foul Play

By Gary E. Lindsley

Kellie Maitland still has keepsakes of her daughter, Brianna that bring joy and happiness to her … along with sadness. One of the keepsakes is a poem written by Brianna when she was a child. It reads, "Mom sees love in Brianna and I see love in Mom."

"We still miss her," Maitland said. She and her husband, Bruce have not given up hoping their daughter will be found.

"We just stick together and try to get through each day."

Brianna was 17 and living in Sheldon when she disappeared March 19, 2004.

Her 1985 Oldsmobile was found by state police early the morning of March 20 with its rear end embedded into an abandoned barn on Route 118 in Montgomery.

The vehicle was about a mile from the Black Lantern where Brianna was a dishwasher.

She clocked out of work at 11:20 and headed to her friend's house in Sheldon where she was living. She had even left her friend a note saying what time she would be home from work. She never made it.

It was not until a few days later, when Brianna's friends contacted the Maitlands, they became aware something was wrong. Her friends asked the Maitlands if Brianna had moved back home. It was the first Bruce and Kellie heard she was missing.

The Maitlands contacted state police in St. Albans to file a missing person's report. State police did not draw any connection between Brianna and the car until nearly a week after the accident.

Kellie said her daughter was doing really well before she disappeared. She had recently passed her GED with flying colors, and worked at KJ's Diner in St. Albans as well as at the Black Lantern.

When Brianna's Oldsmobile was found, the keys were not inside. And her two paychecks were on the front seat untouched.

Also, her ATM card, medication, makeup, clothes and contact lenses were still at her friend's house.

"The [police] who initially handled our case are gone," Kellie said Tuesday night. "The new people have assured us it is an active case."

State police do still consider Brianna's disappearance as an active missing person investigation.

Acting Capt. Glenn Hall of the Vermont State Police Special Investigation Unit took over Brianna's case in the fall of 2006. He said at least 100 tips or leads have been received since then.

"We are still receiving active leads or tips [each month]," Hall said. Some of the tips, he said, include information investigators have received in the past.

One of the most well known tips received was that Brianna was seen at a casino in Atlantic City, N.J., a couple of years ago. Hall said he has no reason to believe the woman was actually Brianna.

"We could not substantiate it," he said.

"Obviously, when you get national media attention, you get sightings from across the country. We have had them in numerous states."

Alleged sightings have occurred in Las Vegas, Texas and California, Hall said.

"We are always hopeful we will get information leading us in the right direction," he said. "We continue to do interviews, including people [we have interviewed] in the past. We have an abundance of information. The case file is very big.

"We have some things we are following so far, but we cannot talk about it," Hall said.

Investigators do not believe Brianna left of her own free will. They believe there is a strong indication Brianna was a victim of foul play.

"Is [her disappearance] connected to drugs? It's a possibility, but we have not substantiated it," he said. "We are going to keep working this thing."

Hall is working the case with Detective Sgt. Matt Birmingham. They have other detectives available as well. And the FBI also is available for assistance, but Hall said no agents are currently assigned to the case.

About four years ago, the Maitlands moved to the St. Lawrence, N.Y., area.

Kellie said she and Bruce are still hopeful Brianna will be found.

"People have been found [since Brianna disappeared]," she said. "At least you hear people are getting justice and [the criminals] are not hurting anyone anymore.

"In the case of Brianna and Maura [Murray], I hope they can be resolved," Kellie said. "Neither of the cases have been moving."

Murray, a University of Massachusetts-Amherst student, was 21 years old when she disappeared after a one-car minor accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., March 9, 2004. She still has not been found.

"I hope Fred can get her back," Kellie said. Fred is Fred Murray, Maura's father.

"I worry about other people's kids."

What really bothers her are girls and young women who want to be independent and go out alone.

"It gets me going," Kellie said. "I don't want it to happen to anybody else. I hope we get a resolution."

In addition to the poem written by Brianna, Kellie cannot bear to part with other keepsakes, such as her daughter's ice skates.

"I cannot give them up," she said.

One thing that is comforting to Kellie is that she now has someone that reminds her of Brianna, a grandson, who is creative and full of energy … just like Brianna.

"Her spirit is alive in anyone who is creative," Kellie said. "We still miss her a lot."

Brianna will be remembered tonight in a special candlelight vigil from 7 to 8 at a small park in Enosburg Falls.

Brianna is 5-feet, 4-inches tall, weighs 105 pounds, has hazel eyes and medium length brown hair. She also has a faint scar in her left eye brow.

People with information about her should call Hall at 802-524-5993.

Courtesy photo - In this March 2004 photo, a 1985 Oldsmobile driven by Brianna Maitland rests partially inside an abandoned barn on Route 118 in Montgomery.

Maitland has not been seen since.
Title: Newspaper Articles #240-Part 1
Post by: MauraMurrayEvidence on December 15, 2019, 09:19:42 am
ABC News 20/20

September 21, 2009

(1 of 2)

Vanished: Two Coeds, Two Horrifying Mysteries, One Finally Solved

By Donna Hunter

Five years after the disappearance of two young coeds, one family can finally begin the closure process.

The remains of Brigham Young University student Brooke Wilberger were found Monday after the lead suspect in her murder, Joel Patrick Courtney, accepted a plea deal. In return for information on the location of Wilberger's remains, Courtney pleaded guilty to aggravated murder -- avoiding a possible death sentence -- and will spend the rest of his life behind bars with no possibility of release.

While police succesfully targeted convicted sex offender Courtney in Wilberger's disappearance, there is still no suspect in the case of Maura Murray, another college student who vanished within three months of Wilberger.

Over the past five years, the families of the two students have forged an unlikely bond.

The two women were just starting their adult lives in early 2004. But too often for young people, particularly young women, that newfound independence is coupled with dangerous vulnerability.

Their stories are similar in many ways. Both were smart, beautiful young women with loving friends and family. They were active in their communities. They had boyfriends who adored them. They were on the verge of very bright futures. Then they disappeared. Figures gathered by the FBI say there are more than 21,500 active missing person cases involving people between the ages of 18 and 29. Now, one family continues to searches for answers.

Community Rallies to Search for Brooke Wilberger

The story of Wilberger's disappearance begins on the afternoon of May 24, 2004. The 19-year-old Brigham Young University student was home in Oregon visiting her family, and helping out her sister and brother-in-law at an apartment complex they manage in the town of Corvallis.

Corvallis is a picturesque Oregon city of about 54,000 people. It's a place most people would consider ideal for raising a family. But even idyllic places can be visited by crime.

"The city of Corvallis is really safe, but we're also in the real world," said Lt. Ron Noble of the Corvallis Police Department.

Wilberger was in the parking lot of the complex cleaning lampposts. When she didn't show up for lunch, her sister, Stephani Hansen, began to worry.

Wilberger's car keys and purse were in their apartment. Her car was in the lot. Her flip-flops were found, but she was gone.

"I got very nervous ... we had exhausted every possibility, we had searched all the apartments that she could possibly be working in. We looked everywhere. Then we called the police," her sister recalled.

Noble remembers receiving the call about the case. "Normally, we would wait. Because adults can come and go as they please and we would normally wait to see if she showed up maybe the next day," he said. But police officials agreed with Wilberger's sister, they sensed Brooke was not the sort of young woman to disappear on her own.

"It was amazing to us that they acted that fast, and I think one of the reasons was when they immediately did a quick check, [they saw] Brooke was a great kid," said her mom, Cammy Wilberger.

As their search began, police eliminated one usual suspect in similar cases -- the boyfriend.

The man in Brooke's life, Justin Blake, who had dated Wilberger since high school, was doing Mormon missionary work in Venezuela. Marriage was on the horizon for the couple, he said.

"I was going to propose. We just both sort of knew what was going to happen when I got back from my mission," he said.

Blake's parents called him in Venezuela to deliver the news that would shatter those plans. "They just started crying when they heard my voice and so I just started crying," he recalled.

In Corvallis, a community-wide search effort had been organized with unusual speed.

"The community of Corvallis was wonderful. That first night they had hundreds of people helping search," Cammy Wilberger said. "Our church organized it, but everyone in the community filled in."

"There were a lot of areas to search and some of it very, very heavy with heavy vegetation. In fact, I remember going home at one o'clock in the morning and there were still 300 people doing concentric circles from where Brooke was last seen," said Noble.

The first night ended with no sign of her.

In the morning, the townsfolk of Corvallis would awake to a shock of another sort -- the largest gathering of media the town had ever seen.

"We had to operate on a whole different paradigm for this investigation, because we didn't have anything to go on. So we needed the media to stay here to talk about the case so people would call in tips," Noble said.

A Suspect at Last

Despite the authorities' quick response, community support and national media coverage, it was years before a prime suspect would emerge.

The Benton County district attorney said today that it was only after police in New Mexico arrested Courtney for allegedly abducting a young woman there, that they found their suspect.

New Mexico authorities suspected that Courtney might have attacked other women, and contacted law enforcement throughout the West, asking if there were other cases that resembled the one they were investigating.

When Corvallis police started investigating Courtney, they discovered he was in the city at the time Wilberger disappeared and drove a van matching the description of the vehicle seen nearby where they believed the young woman had been kidnapped.

When authorities linked him to Wilberger, Courtney was in prison in New Mex