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Author Topic: Newspaper Articles  (Read 1392 times)

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 90
« Reply #90 on: December 12, 2019, 02:33:19 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

Monday May 10, 2004

Families Issue Emotional Plea For FBI Help

By Gary E. Lindsley

WOODSVILLE, NEW HAMPSHIRE -- When Fred Murray and Kellie Maitland met for the first time Saturday morning, it was a very emotional moment for the parents of two missing young women.

Maitland went up to Murray and they tenderly embraced, both knowing one another's pain of not knowing what has happened to their daughters.

Murray's daughter, Maura, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill the night of Feb. 9.

Maitland's daughter, 17-year-old Brianna, has been missing since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, Vt., the night of March 19.

Maitland, her husband, Bruce, and Murray were joined by Charlotte and Michael Riley of Chester, N.H., in a press conference at the American Legion, Ross-Wood Post 20, in Woodsville Saturday morning.

The Rileys were told their daughter, Amie, who had been missing since August, was found in April in a swamp in Manchester. She had been brutally murdered.

Murray and the Maitlands clamored for public support in having the FBI brought in to investigate not only the disappearances of Maura and Brianna, but also the murder of Amie.

Murray has been beseeching New Hampshire State Police officials at Troop F to call in the FBI to join the investigation since learning his daughter was missing.

The FBI will not join an investigation until asked by the police agency handling a case.

And after learning about the disappearance of Brianna, Murray and the Maitlands called for state police in both New Hampshire and Vermont to call in the FBI.

State police officials in both New Hampshire and Vermont have said there isn't any connection between Maura and Brianna's disappearances, other than they both were involved in car accidents.

However, they also have not said how they have ruled out any connection.

"Something has to be done," Charlotte Riley said. "It's important. No one knows where to turn. I don't want (the media) to portray my grief. I want them to portray something has to be changed."

She spoke about how the police in Manchester did not place her daughter's information into the National Crime Information Center until three months after she had disappeared.

Riley said until a case gets an NCIC number, parents of missing children do not receive any help with searches or posters or from support groups.

Kellie Maitland said her daughter had been at a party a week before she disappeared. She had been assaulted at that party. "Maybe she knew something," she said. "We are hoping someone out there knows something."

Murray said, "We need help. All three families need help. None of us have our daughters. If these three cases are connected, and they very well could be, it's horrendous. You could have a killer locally in your midst." He said there is ample reason for the FBI to become involved.

"We are asking for your help," Murray said, pleading to the public through the media. "People should be screaming for the FBI. We want this to be brought to a close. You owe it to yourselves, folks."

Bruce Maitland said although he has been told the cases aren't related, he believes no one has really looked into whether they are connected.

"I am going to practically beg the governor (Jim Douglas) to step up to the plate," he said. "Let's give (state police) some help."

Kellie Maitland said she felt as if they are up against the wall.

She spoke about a drug bust at a crack house in Vermont in which those busted were let back out on the street the very next day.

"We can't keep having a revolving door for criminals," Kellie Maitland said. "They are back out there. We don't have our daughter."

"Not one more girl!" she continued, her voice quivering. "Not one more beautiful girl! They are bright. They are talented. Not one more. It's a pretty bad Mother's Day."

With that, she walked away from the microphones and went over to Murray, tears streaming down her face. He hugged her, trying to console her.

Her husband joined her and laid his head on top of hers, encircling his arms around her as they listened to Charlotte Riley speak. Riley said until people are in such a situation, they have no idea what it is like.

She spoke about the lack of media coverage after it was determined her daughter was missing. "She was at a bar," Riley said. "Does that make her less of a person?" The Maitlands and Murray responded with a resounding no.

She also emphasized the importance of pressing police to enter the information into the NCIC system. "The system is not working," Riley said. "Three months! It was three long months before she was considered missing!"

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 91
« Reply #91 on: December 12, 2019, 02:35:11 pm »
Journal Opinion

May 12, 2004

Missing woman's parents plead for FBI, local help

By Cicely Richardson

Woodsville -- On a sunny spring morning with a chill wind the parents of two missing young women held a press conference on May 8 outside American Legion Post #20 in Woodsville. They suggested the two cases may be connected and wanted local police to call in the FBI.

Bruce and Kellie Maitland of East Franklin, VT, and Fred Murray of Hanson, MA, had summoned newspaper and television representatives to keep alive the search for their daughters and raise the awareness of people throughout the area. They were joined by Charlotte and Michael Riley of Chester, NH, whose daughter Amie had disappeared last summer. Her body was found eight months later.

"Why are we here?" said Kelly Maitland. "We're all hoping someone out there knows something."

"We need help. We don't have our daughters," said Murray.

Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts, had disappeared after running off the road on a sharp curve in Route 112 east of Swiftwater, on Feb. 9. A bus driver who lived near by reportedly came upon the disabled car around 7 p.m. and offered to help, be she declined. He then went home and called the police. The Haverhill police, who responded, did not find Murray.

Brianna Maitland, 17, disappeared on March 19 after leaving work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery, VT. She was heading to Shelton, VT where she was living with a friend. Later that night, her car was found, backed into an abandoned house about a mile away from the inn.

While the Vermont and New Hampshire state police see no connection between the two cases, the parents think a connection is likely. They point out that both involved young women who were driving alone at night on rural roads. Kelly Maitland said that "accident situations" 90 miles apart in this area were "unusual."

If these cases are connected, said Murray, "The people of this area have a horrendous situation -- they could have a killer walking in their midst." Murray and the Maitlands would like to see the FBI brought in, to centrally coordinate and run all three cases -- the search for Maura Murray and Brianna Maitland and for the killer of Annie Riley.

"The State police work hard and they're nice guys. But they are restricted in their resources, and they've hit a stone wall," said Murray. He said the FBI had offered help, but local police refused. He pointed out that his daughter disappeared not far from the Connecticut River, but the New Hampshire State Police investigation cannot cross the river, the border with Vermont.

If the cases are unrelated, he continued, and "if a local bad guy from this area harmed my daughter, people here have to be uneasy."

Since February night, Murray has been searching fir his daughter, crawling through every bridge and culvert, pressing the police, checking bus stations and asking bus drivers if they saw his daughter. He has checked topographical maps to identify where a vehicle might have gone, checked with neighbors as to what was accessible, and searched.

Murray expressed particular frustration by the news this week that a second person had seen a young woman walking east on Route 112 about four or five miles east of the accident scene about an hour later. "I'm convinced it was my daughter," said Murray, adding, "so when the police arrived she was right around the corner. They could have taken a ride up the road and grabbed her."

A star in the windshield of the car indicated she may have hit her head, there was an empty beer can on the floor, and the outside temperature was 12 degrees, Murray said. "She was in danger." Why hadn't the police driven further or called the next town for help and why had it taken three months for another witness to come forward, he asked.

Addressing the people of the area, Murray pleaded, "Search your own property. Use your imagination. I can't possibly cover every single place." He also called on people to ask their local agencies to help. "If somebody here did something, he is still with you," he warned.

"I am asking the people of the north country to call the FBI," Murray concluded.

Murray joined the search for his daughter 36 hours after she disappeared, but the Maitlands did not even learn of their daughter's disappearance until four or five days after the car was found. Bruce Maitland said that, despite a slow start and bad weather, "We've essentially covered the area" of Franklin County. "It's blatantly apparent that she's not here," he continued, adding that the police do not have the resources to look further.

Kelly Maitland said that "awful rumors" that Brianna had been found and descriptions of how "broke out" almost immediately after their daughter's disappearance became public. Those have continued, but by now the Maitlands have learned not to believe anything until they hear it from police.

One problem, said Bruice Maitland, is that if anyone over 12 years old disappears, it is first treated as a runaway. "She wasn't living with us at the time, but she didn't run away," he said. Uncashed paychecks, contact lenses, clothes, jewelry and medicine she needed were all in her car, a sure sign to her mother that she had not run away.

"It feels like we've reached a wall," said Maitland. "There's no structure that helps lead us now." Her husband proposed that every state should have one or two officers who are trained to investigate accident scenes and disappearances. He said he had made that recommendation to Gov. Jim Douglas..

"Schools are coming to close, and your kids are going to be out there walking the roads," her husband added. "These people need to be found."

"Not one more beautiful girl -- they're talented, they're intelligent. We're not losing one more," vowed Kelly Maitland.

"My daughter was missing eight months -- her body was found," said Charlotte Riley. "You can't imagine what it feels like. We're as much victims as my daughter was." She said her daughter, a high school dropout, had disappeared from a bar, and "no one took it seriously."

Riley shared information on the organizations she had learned about that can help families of missing children and adults. The first step, she said is to get a National Crime Information Center (NCIC) number which must be assigned by local police.

Calling on the press to "make the public aware," Riley said had been no press coverage for their daughter until her body was found, and it had been three months for authorities to recognize her as missing. "The system isn't working -- its just isn't working," said Riley. "We need to make the system work for all of us."

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 92
« Reply #92 on: December 12, 2019, 02:37:03 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

May 14, 2004

Dad can't give up search for daughter

By Mike Recht

HAVERHILL -- There are 48 mountains in New Hampshire at least 4,000 feet high, and Fred Murray has climbed them all -- many of them with his daughter Maura. They snowshoed together, ran road races together.

When she was in high school, then at West Point and later at the University of Massachusetts as a nursing student, they would go away on camping weekends.

He coached her in softball and basketball, and in her early years, he picked her up from school every day.

"This kid is my buddy," he said.

But he hasn't seen her since early February.

Maura Murray disappeared after she failed to make a curve on rural Route 112 and hit a snowbank while driving the night of Feb. 9 in northwest New Hampshire. She escaped serious injury and asked a nearby resident who came by not to call police. He did anyway, but by the time they arrived, she had vanished into the wintry night, leaving her car and belongings behind.

She also left behind her mother and two sisters, one a police officer and the other a West Point graduate stationed at Fort Bragg, who might soon be sent to Iraq. And she left behind her father.

It's been three months and he hasn't given up hope of finding her, even if she is dead.

"Do I want to find her? Not really. I keep looking, but I don't want to be successful. It's a horrible position to be in," he said.

Murray said his daughter might have been distraught because she had another accident two days earlier. She also apparently planned to get away because she lied to professors about a death in the family and said she would be gone from class for the week, then packed her belongings as if she was moving out.

However, Murray believes she might have been the victim of foul play, although police said there is no evidence pointing in that direction.

Almost every weekend since Feb. 9, he has made the eight-hour round-trip drive from his home in Weymouth, Mass., to the Woodsville section of Haverhill. He searches the vast forest or knocks on doors and questions neighbors who might have seen something. He also hands out fliers with Maura's picture.

His daughters and Maura's boyfriend, who is in the military, were able to help at first, and occasionally some volunteers join him. Last weekend, a couple from Vermont, the Maitlands, whose own daughter disappeared in March, searched with him.

But most of the time, he's alone, arriving Friday night, searching until dark Saturday and into late afternoon Sunday and then driving home.

He doesn't even think about whether he will make the trip.

"There's no decision to make. There's no option," he said. "As a father, I don't think about it. It's automatic.

"How am I able to stand this? I don't know. I make myself do it. It's got to be done. I don't want to be here.

"Some mornings I hate to wake up; I hate to open my eyes."

Last weekend was particularly difficult. The Maitlands were coming, and so were the Rileys of Manchester, whose daughter disappeared last August and was found dead in Manchester. The media was invited to call attention to their desperation.

"I knew I was going to have to talk about it," Murray said.

The searching is easier.

During the winter, he searched the snow for footprints. The snow is gone now, so he searches the woods alongside the road. He even climbs through culverts under the road, head down, looking for any clue.

"I don't want to look up, afraid of what I might see," he said. When he finds nothing, "it's a great relief," he said. "Not finding her (body) is encouraging."

He even searched the Kancamagus Highway -- one of her favorite places about 25 miles away -- should she have contemplated suicide, though he is quick to point out, "I don't think she did."

He doesn't know how long he will keep coming back, but there always is another area to search. Only recently, a man came forward and said he saw someone who matched Maura's description about five miles up the road from the accident scene. Maura, a runner and hiker, easily could have covered the 18 miles to Woodstock, or the five miles back into Woodsville and across the Connecticut River into Wells River, Vt., where a bus leaves at 11 every night.

"I don't think about how long I'll keep going," he said. "I search it and can put my mind at ease that I looked there."

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 93
« Reply #93 on: December 12, 2019, 02:38:55 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

May 16, 2004

Lost -- and sometimes found in the White Mountains

By Lorna Colquhoun

If nowhere is a place where no one has trod for decades, than Mount Kancamagus is in the middle of it.

A hiker found himself there last week on what the Appalachian Mountain Club's White Mountain Guide describes as a "trailless mass of round, wooded ridges" and where he stumbled upon human remains.

Several law enforcement officials returned with the man the next day to retrieve the remains and last week, dental records confirmed this was Steven Romines, a Massachusetts man who went missing almost 20 years ago, in October of 1984. Investigators say initial reports had indicated that he was "distraught" at the time and while no cause of death was determined, it is likely that he committed suicide.

"From where the location was, he was off the beaten path," said State Police Lt. John Scarinza, commander of Troop F in Twin Mountain.

The discovery was a bit of a wonder and a reminder of the secrets the mountains keep -- and sometimes reveal in their own time.

New Hampshire may be a small state and "sprawl" might be a buzzword in some parts of it, but there are places here where people get lost.

Sometimes they are never found.

Tough to find

Last week's recovery is certainly not the first time remains have been discovered after a significant length of time has passed.

Ten years ago, hikers on the Valley Way trail in Randolph discovered the remains of a Massachusetts woman. The Valley Way, the most direct and easiest trail to the AMC's Madison Hut, is a popular route. According to newspaper accounts, her remains were found no more than 75 feet off the trail.

She had been reported missing nine years before.

State Police Sgt. Bob Bruno can understand how difficult it is to find someone who wanted to be lost. He hiked up Mount Kancamagus last weekend.

"There was no trail," he said. "We were climbing up rock ledge and through small balsams. We put our heads down and just pushed."

And even when they got to the top of one of the ridges where the hiker took a GPS reading after discovering the bones, Bruno said they did not find them right away.

"Even with sophisticated equipment, we couldn't find it," he said.

Plenty of missing cases

Local police say they get field several calls a year from relatives reporting that loved ones may have headed for the mountains intending to end their lives. Veteran officers who have dealt with these situations say in such stressful moments, people return to an area where they had once found happiness or other spiritual reasons.

"How many others have there been over the years?" Bruno mused, noting that some people may have never been reported missing.

"I know there are others out there who have never been found. If I sat down, I could probably come up with quite a few others."

There is no list, per se, of people believed missing in the White Mountains. Bruno, a 24-year veteran of State Police, figured the remains he helped retrieve last week were either Romines' or another man who had been reported missing years before.

The remains were not of the young man who went missing in 1983 from Franconia Notch. He remains a mountain statistic whose fate has yet to unfold.

The Miller mystery

Michael Miller was 23 in 1983, up with friends from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for an October weekend. On that particular Sunday, according to newspaper accounts, he shouted "See you at the summit" to a group of friends and departed up the Old Bridle Path on Mount Lafayette.

It was 3 p.m. on that day, far too late to consider summitting the 5,260-foot mountain. He wore jeans, boots and a leather jacket over a sweater.

A search that lasted nearly a week followed, in weather conditions that deteriorated, as they do rapidly in the approach to winter. On the last day, winds howled at hurricane force.

To this day, nothing indicating what might have happened to him as ever been found.

"It happens," said Grafton County Sheriff Charlie Barry, a former director of the state's Fish and Game Department.

One of his most puzzling cases happened more than 30 years ago.

Ethel Conners' last walk

"Her name was Ethel Conners and she and her husband -- they were both in their 80s -- lived in Plymouth," he recalled.

One night, they took a ride up to a house they owned on Swain Hill in the Glencliff area of Warren. He started mowing the lawn. She changed her shoes and told him she was going to take a walk up the road.

"He kept mowing and when he finished, she never showed up," Barry said.

What followed was a massive search of the area, involving scores of people. Barry spent time in a helicopter searching from the air. Volunteers did line searches along the side of the road, in case she had been struck by a car and thrown into the woods.

"We searched from Glencliff to Warren," he said. "We never did locate her."

A case as puzzling as the Conners disappearance has been shaping up in the woods of Haverhill, where Maura Murray, a Massachusetts nursing student, was last seen following a minor car accident in February. Air and ground searches have failed to turn up any clues.

The Learjet

It has not only been people whose fates have been concealed by the mountains. In the past five decades, at least three planes had disappeared and were not discovered for lengthy periods of time.

The most recent, and perplexing, mystery was the Learjet that went missing out of Lebanon on Christmas Eve 1996. Unequipped with a locator device that would likely have denoted where it went down, the jet was found by an Orford forester, Quentin Mack, in a depression on Smart's Mountain in Dorchester.

It was missing for almost three years, despite intensive searches in the years that followed.

Mack told investigators that he had been within 100 yards of the crash site the week before.

"The notion people have that the woods are full of people is definitely not true," said Fish and Game Lt. Dave Hewitt the day after the crash was discovered. "There are many areas in the state where no human being has put a footprint on the ground in years and years."

That was the case in this area. There was no trail leading to the site -- getting there involved about 45 minutes of bushwhacking through some challenging terrain, but a little more than half a mile off a well-maintained logging road.

The Cessna

The Learjet was not the only aircraft crash in New Hampshire that went undiscovered. In June 1972, a hiker on Jennings Peak in Waterville Valley discovered the wreckage, and the body of the Iowa pilot still strapped inside, of a Cessna.

It had been missing since March 1966.

"It had been bound for Maine from Burlington, Vt.," said Paul Leavitt, the assistant Grafton County Sheriff, who was the Waterville Valley police chief at the time. He described the crash area as heavily wooded.

The Piper Comanche

The most fabled lost plane went down in February 1959, when two doctors on the staff of the Dartmouth Medical College were returning from an emergency in Berlin aboard a Piper Comanche.

That plane was missing for more than 80 days, recalled Barry, who was a young conservation officer at the time and had participated in the extensive search.

It was finally discovered that May, after a plane went up on a search. The Piper had gone down in the remote Pemigewasset wilderness, about 12 miles north of Lincoln and about nine miles off the Kancamagus Highway.

"The snow had melted and you could see it right from the air -- it was upside down," Barry said.

It was later found that the two doctors had survived for several days after the crash and had left notes for their families.

Mount Kinsman legend

There is other lore in these mountain places of people who went missing and were later found. Some have been lost in time, the legends outliving the archival knowledge of people who knew about it.

One of those legends comes out of the little town of Easton. In a slim volume of the town's history published in 1976, "Looking Back at Easton" tells the curious story of a Mormon settlement in the Easton Valley, on the slopes of Mount Kinsman.

"Legend has it that these people, originally from Vermont, were living here in the 1830s," the story goes. "One day, the people of the valley looked up toward the settlement and saw smoke from the chimneys. On going up to investigate, they found the stoves still warm, with pots of porridge cooling on them, but no sign of people."

It was surmised that these settlers had gone west where their leader, Joseph Smith, was establishing a home for the Church of the Latter Day Saints, according to the Easton history.

Robert Frost, who lived for several years in neighboring Franconia, immortalized the story in a poem, "A Fountain, A Bottle, A Donkey's Ears and Some Books." In it, Frost is badgering a local man to take him to the ruins of the settlement.

"To shut you up, I'll tell you what I'll do:

I'll find that fountain if it takes all summer

And both our united strengths to do it."

"You lost it, then?"

"Not so, but I can find it.

No doubt it's grown up some to woods around it."

Frost never found the settlement, nor has anyone else over the years. The Easton history notes that determining who these Mormons were, where they lived, and when they lived in town "has been an absorbing task."

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 94
« Reply #94 on: December 12, 2019, 02:40:47 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

May 21, 2004

Another Person Reported Missing - Man Fails To Return From Walk

By Gary E. Lindsley

A 24-year-old man is the fourth person to be reported missing since the beginning of this year in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont and the North Country of New Hampshire.

Matthew Harris, a coordinator of a meditation course at Karme Choling in Barnet, was last seen leaving the Buddhist meditation retreat at 3 p.m. Tuesday. He had a walking stick and a day pack.

Officials at Karme Choling reported Harris missing at 3 p.m. Wednesday.

State police Sgt. Robert Clark doesn't believe there is any connection to the disappearance of three other people.

Another 24-year-old man, Timothy Young of Glover, Vt., was the first to be reported missing. Glover, who is 6 feet tall, weighs 180 pounds and has blond hair, was last seen Jan. 20.

On Feb. 9, 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray disappeared after being involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H.

She is a 5-foot, 7-inch brunette, weighs 115 pounds and has blue eyes.

Another young woman, 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon, Vt., hasn't been seen since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery around 11:20 the night of March 19.

Maitland has medium dark brown hair, hazel eyes, weighs about 105-110 pounds and is 5 feet 4 inches tall.

Although a missing person report has been filed on Harris, Clark does not believe he fits in the missing person category.

Clark said Harris has departed for areas unknown without telling anybody in the past. He does not believe Harris' disappearance is connected in any way to those of Young, Murray and Maitland.

"He is a free-spirited traveler," he said. "You can't lump him in with the others. He may not know he is (listed as) missing. He has a history of traveling the world while following different religious organizations."

Clark said during 2001-02, Harris took off without telling anybody where he was going. He was found in the Amazon in Peru emaciated, weighing only 82 pounds.

Then, from November 2003 to February 2004, he went to Scotland, following a religious sect.

"It's not like a 14-year-old girl who lives next to me and does not show up for work," Clark said as an example. "She's a missing person. That scenario is different from this."

State police have issued a bulletin to all police agencies in New England to be on the lookout for Harris.

If a police officer spots Harris, he or she is to ensure Harris is OK. The police officer is then supposed to contact Clark.

"He has a right to (go anywhere he wants)," Clark said. "He has a right not to have police following him. This is completely, completely different than the other three. This is a kid with a history (of taking off)."

Harris' father, Paul, doesn't agree.

He said when Matthew took off for the Amazon, he had let him and his wife, Anne, know. The same was the case when he went to Scotland.

"He had told us he was going to the Amazon," Harris said. "He called and told us he was going on a slow boat down the Amazon and we wouldn't hear from him four or five weeks."

When the five weeks had come and gone and they hadn't heard anything, the Harrises became concerned. Through the help of a shortwave radio operator, they learned he was in a Peruvian village and in bad shape.

Harris said Matthew went with the head of Karme Choling, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, to Scotland for about three months.

"It's sort of like being asked by the pope to be his assistant," Harris said.

His son, he said, is very learned and intelligent. "He is very generous and outgoing," he said. "We (once) gave him a watch. We asked him several months later how he liked his watch. He said he had given it to someone who needed it more."

Harris had praise for Karme Choling. "They are a terrific organization and they have treated Matt fantastically well. This is very out of character for him."

Founded in 1970 by ChÜgyam Trungpa Rinpoche, KarmÉ ChÜling offers year-round meditation retreats and yoga retreats.

Matthew, according to his father, left behind his passport, clothes and study materials.

Josh Silberstein, the retreat's health and well-being director, said Matthew had worked at Karme Choling for 21/2 years until October 2003.

Silberstein said Matthew had returned in February to work as coordinator of a meditation program.

He said Matthew was last seen by Bill Brauer, Karme Choling's director. "It's not uncommon for people to go for a walk," Silberstein said. "So, Director Brauer did not think anything about it."

Like Matthew's father, Silberstein said the 24-year-old's disappearance is out of character.

When Matthew did not show up for dinner at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Silberstein was notified. "Then, we did an exhaustive search of the land," he said, which consists of 675 acres of fields, forest and hills.

The search ran from 7:15 to 10:30 Tuesday night. Then, it resumed at 10:30 Wednesday morning. The search of the property ended about 12:30 p.m.

Then, members of Karme Choling drove about 20 miles south and north on Interstate 91. They also searched sections of Route 5.

When 3 p.m. Wednesday arrived, and Matthew had not returned, Silberstein said state police were notified.

Silberstein said Matthew did not appear to be despondent or depressed any more than anyone else, until the day he disappeared. "After lunch, it was noticed he was more erratic," he said. "His demeanor changed. He was not there ... he was off thinking about something. He was not as interactive as he normally was."

Matthew is fluent in Spanish and can speak some French and Italian. He also knows sign language.

He is 6 feet, 2 inches tall, weighs 175 pounds, has blond, close cropped hair, and has a red and blue chain-like tattoo around his left arm. He also wears glasses.

Anyone with information about Matthew's whereabouts are asked to call state police at 802-748-3111.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 95
« Reply #95 on: December 12, 2019, 02:42:39 pm »
The Patriot Ledger

May 24, 2004

Coping pains families of the missing: Says mother of Molly Bish, it's ‘like a bad movie'

By Joe McGee

Magi Bish remembers the ‘‘fragile Fridays,'' an end-of-the-week prayer ritual of asking God for one more week of strength to continue looking for her missing daughter, Molly.

And Maureen Lemieux will never forget going to bed and not wanting to wake up when her 10-year-old granddaughter, Holly Piirainen, went missing.

With the search for Maura Murray more than three months old, times also have turned desperate for family and friends of the 22-year-old Hanson woman who disappeared on Feb. 9 in Haverhill, N.H. There is no trace of Murray. Her ATM and cell phone have been dormant. Woods have been searched by ground and air several times.

Bish and Lemieux, who lived through the same anguish in two of the state's highest-profile missing person cases, said the need to know what happened is indescribable.

‘‘Evil is what this is,'' Magi Bish said. ‘‘It's like a bad movie and you can't get out, and the fear when you don't know what happened, it can make people cross over. I fought the mental monsters every day.''

Maura Murray's family has traveled to New Hampshire countless times. Every weekend they make the four-hour trek from the family home in Hanson to New Hampshire to canvass rural woods and interview people they have never met in hopes of finding any scrap of information.

Bish said it is hard to explain how someone makes it that long with little hope of seeing their child alive again. Investigators last spring found Molly Bish's skeletal remains 5 miles from the Bish home in West Warren. Molly had been last seen in June 2000 at Cummins Pond in Warren, where she worked as a lifeguard.

Magi Bish and her husband, John, devised their own coping mechanism during the three years of not knowing Molly's fate.

‘‘We had what we called ‘fragile Fridays.' If we got through one more week, we knew we could do it again the next,'' Bish said.

Maura Murray's father, Fred Murray, has been the most active figure in the search for his daughter. His public criticism of police, his consultation with a psychic and his compulsive hikes to New Hampshire are all symptoms of the aching quest to know what happened, Maureen Lemieux said.

Lemieux's granddaughter Holly Piirainen was found dead about two months after being abducted from her family's summer cottage in Sturbridge in August 1993.

‘‘Mostly my son went out,'' Lemieux said. ‘‘They took ATVs, four-wheel-drive vehicles, whatever they could do up in the woods, looking around. They went with psychics. You don't want to leave any stone unturned. If somebody thought they had an idea, you went with it. If there was a psychic or anyone that sounded reasonable, we left immediately and searched.''

The Bish family has spoken to Fred Murray and offered their support. Magi Bish said she identifies with Fred's tireless spirit. It is all you have in a situation like this, she said.

‘‘If you're a ‘doer,' and Fred sounds like he is, you just go. I'm sure it's hard because they live so far away, but you just do it. You're never prepared,'' Bish said.

As the weeks pass, the frustration grows for investigators.

New Hampshire State Police Sgt. Thomas York said police have followed up on every piece of information. Detectives are still active on the case, but the ground searches will be discontinued until a credible tip comes along. York said he realizes they may never find Maura.

Recently New Hampshire state police found the remains of Steven Romines, a Massachusetts man who disappeared in the White Mountains 20 years ago. It can take that long, York said.

‘‘We're coming to the end of what we can possibly do,'' York said. ‘‘I hope that things turn out for the best for Maura, I really do.''

Reality is also setting in for Murray's college friends in Amherst that they may never see her again. Kate Markopoulos, a track teammate of Murray's at UMass, said she is getting classmates' E-mails addresses and phone numbers to stay in touch after she graduates. Markopoulos was taking finals last week and packing to return home to upstate New York.

‘‘I think it'll hit me after I graduate because I'll start calling people and I can't call Maura,'' Markopoulos said.

‘‘She was one of the people I planned on keeping in contact with after school, especially because she loved where I'm from because it's near the Adirondacks. She loved hiking,'' Markopoulos said.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.

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Newspaper Articles # 96
« Reply #96 on: December 12, 2019, 02:44:31 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

May 25, 2004

Petition Drive Demands Action In Maitland Case - Seeks Action From Governor Douglas

By Gary E. Lindsley

The fear in her grandson's voice was the final straw for Lou Byam of Franklin.

Byam has mounted a petition drive to demand Vermont Gov. Jim Douglas, Lt. Gov. Brian Dubie, and Vermont Public Safety Commissioner Kerry Sleeper take definitive action in the disappearance of 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon.

"My grandson, who is 14, said, 'I don't want to come up here,'" Byam said. Her grandson did not want to visit her in northern Vermont because of the disappearance of Maitland and his concern for his own safety.

"He's scared," Byam said. "Parents are scared. Everyone's scared. We want answers and we aren't getting them."

The petitions, which are being circulated around sections of northern Vermont, read, "We, the undersigned concerned citizens of the state of Vermont, summer residents and tourists of the state of Vermont, do hereby petition the governor, lieutenant governor and the Vermont State Police Commissioner to figure out a way to find Brianna Maitland, no matter what it takes to get her home!

"We, as parents, friends, family, community, state, caring humans and taxpayers say enough is enough! It it time to do whatever it takes to get Brianna and others like her home."

The petition also notes because Maitland has not been found, it is time to bring in help, more resources.

"We live in fear for our children's health, safety, welfare and their lives," it reads. "Our children no longer have the freedom as an American citizen to walk, ride their bicycles, go shopping or drive their vehicles safely in our state!

"The government's first duty is to make sure its citizens are safe from crime. We are angry and want the wheels of motivation kicked into high gear. Bring Bri home now!"

Maitland has not been seen since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn late the night of March 19. Her vehicle was found partially ensconced in an abandoned building about a mile from the inn early March 20.

She disappeared more than a month after 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray was involved in a one-car accident on rural Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H.

Murray has not been seen since walking away from the accident scene the night of Feb. 9.

"Our children are our most valuable resources," Byam said. "The way the state police handled this since day one has been unacceptable. It kills me. Every day we see Bruce and Kellie (Brianna's parents). We want our state back. We want Brianna back."

"I hope it works," Kellie Maitland said, referring to the petitions. "I am starting to get desperate."

Bettina Desrochers, who is from St. Johnsbury, also is upset about the two missing young women. "It seems as if not enough is being done," she said. "We need more help. There isn't anything wrong with asking for more help."

As a parent of daughters whom she said are all beautiful, young and outgoing, her heart goes out to the Maitlands, as well as to Fred Murray, Maura's father.

With summer nearing, she is concerned about students getting out of school and their safety. "Wouldn't you want to know (the disappearances) are being handled properly?" Desrochers said.

Carolyn Gendron, who lives in Richford, also believes the investigation into Brianna's disappearance was botched from the start. She said common sense says if Brianna left behind her paychecks and driver's license, she didn't disappear willingly.

"They should know a kid wouldn't leave money behind," she said, referring to the state police. "As a parent, if it was my daughter, I don't think I could be as calm as Mr. and Mrs. Maitland."

Gendron believes the best investigators the state police have should be involved in the investigation. She also believes the FBI should be asked to be a major part of the search for Brianna.

Gendron said she almost lost her own daughter a few years ago. "Our daughter was coming home from a study group when she noticed a car kept driving by her," she said.

When there was an open area, the car pulled in front of Gendron's then 16-year-old daughter and the occupants screamed for her to get in the car. "She froze," Gendron said. "Luckily, a friend came forward and saw her and took her away."

So, she said, she got a little bit of a taste of what the Maitlands must be going through. "I can't imagine going to bed every night not knowing where this child is," Gendron said.

She truly believes there is a connection between Brianna's and Maura's disappearances. "They are too much alike," Gendron said. "They need to do a lot more to bring these girls home."

Bruce Maitland has put out his own plea to Vermont officials. "Brianna is not a runaway no matter how much the Vermont State Police ... try to play down her abduction," he wrote in a letter to the editor to area newspapers. "We desperately need you to step up for what is right and demand a large investigation involving many plainclothes/additional federal people on the ground to find Brianna and Maura before the trail goes any colder."

Today is Missing Children's Day. Carol Knowlton of the Mt. Angel, Ore.-based Child Seek Network will be reading Brianna's and Maura's names at a Missing Children's Day rally in Salem, Ore.

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Newspaper Articles # 97
« Reply #97 on: December 12, 2019, 04:05:49 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

Wednesday, May 26, 2004

Fred Murray Appeals To Governor Benson Says Police Failed His Daughter

By Gary E. Lindsley

The father of a missing 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student is appealing to Gov. Craig Benson to urge New Hampshire State Police to call in the FBI for help in finding his daughter.

Maura Murray has been missing since she was involved in a minor one-car accident the evening of Feb. 9 after her black 1996 Saturn failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve on Route 112 in Haverhill.

"The finest resource in the world is available and you, sir, should direct Lieutenant John Scarinza and Troop F to accept its offer," Fred Murray said in his letter. "There are corollary cases in Vermont also and this entire situation begs for central coordination and investigation by an agency which is not bound by the confines of configuration of Grafton County and the Connecticut River." Scarinza is the commander of Troop F, which is based in Twin Mountain.

Murray also was referring to Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., who disappeared after she left work late the night of March 19. Her car was found partially ensconced in an abandoned building about one mile from the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery where she worked.

Murray noted the FBI offered its assistance during the week of his daughter's disappearance. However, state police declined the offer. Scarinza said the FBI was involved in background searches and gathering information in Massachusetts. He has said the state police have enough resources to conduct an investigation into Maura's disappearance.

Besides asking Benson to direct the state police to call in the FBI, Murray also has claimed state police and Haverhill police had been grossly negligent because a cruiser was not dispatched east along Route 112 to help find his daughter after her accident.

He said police arrived within minutes after Maura was last seen by an eyewitness. "This means that when the police reached the scene, Maura could have been no further than a couple of hundred yards up the road around the first corner walking away," Murray said in his letter.

Police, including Sgt. Cecil Smith of the Haverhill Police Department, were told the driver of the car was a young woman about 20 years old. "There was an empty beer bottle found in the car and in addition, there was a spider hole in the driver's side of the windshield indicating that she had struck her head at impact," Murray's letter reads.

Murray said police should have called ahead to the Woodstock Police Department so officers from that community could have driven west to intercept Maura on the dark, desolate highway.

"She was figuratively and nearly literally right there readily available to be rescued and saved from whatever fate has befallen her," Murray said in his letter. "All that the police had to do was to expend minimal mental and physical effort."

If they had done so, Murray said, Maura would be safe with him today. "Unfortunately, the police neglected to make even the most basic effort to find her and I remain without her now, and perhaps, forever," Murray's letter continued. "The onus of this irresponsible and possibly fatal lack of action lies not only with the North Haverhill force, but also with the New Hampshire State Police who responded to the 911 calls from the neighbors as well."

Another witness is believed to have spotted Maura, who is a track star and runner, about four to five miles east of the accident scene running toward Woodstock. "I get nearly physically sick when I wake up each morning and the thought of how really little effort it would have taken to rescue my daughter automatically flashes through my mind," Murray said in his letter.

In addition to sending the letter to Benson, Murray also sent copies of it to New Hampshire Attorney General Peter Heed, state police Col. Frederick Booth, and U.S. Sen. John Sununu and Judd Gregg. Alicia Preston, Benson's press secretary, said Benson had not received the letter as of late Tuesday afternoon.

However, Murray said according to tracking records on the U.S. Postal Service Web site, Benson, Heed, Booth, Sununu and Gregg's offices received the letters Monday morning. "The young women in the northern region of your state are not safe and it is clearly imperative that you act decisively before you lose another," Murray stated in his letter. "Deep within themselves, your citizens are nervously apprehensive and anxiously awaiting your response to this threat." Booth could not be reached for comment Tuesday. And Simon Brown, chief of the attorney general's criminal bureau, said he was not aware of Murray's letter.

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Newspaper Articles # 98
« Reply #98 on: December 12, 2019, 04:07:51 pm »
Fred Murray's Letter to Governor Benson

May 26, 2004

Mr. Frederick Murray

Governor Craig Benson

Office of the Governor

107 North Main Street

Room 208

Concord NH 03301

Governor Benson:

My daughter, Maura Murray, went missing after a one car accident on February 9, 2004 at approximately 7:00 PM while she was heading east on Route 112 near North Haverhill, New Hampshire. Eye witnesses place her at the crash site at one (1) to two (2) minutes before the local police arrived and no one was seen to stop and pick her up in a vehicle. This means that when the police reached the scene Maura could have been no further than a couple of hundred yards up the road around the first corner walking away. Another witness who stopped and talked with her reported to the police upon their arrival that the driver of the car was a young woman of approximately twenty (20) years of age. He added that he thought she had been drinking. There was an empty beer bottle found in the car and in addition, there was a spider hole in the driver’s side of the windshield indicating that she had struck her head at impact. The temperature that evening was twelve (12) degrees.

Given these known facts it was grossly negligent of the police to not dispatch a cruiser in active pursuit in a spirited effort to retrieve an unsuspecting and vulnerable girl with a possible head injury and subject to hypothermia because of alcohol and frigid temperature before she wandered into the pitch black of the national forest looming just ahead.

The police had full knowledge that if she were to encounter someone with ill intent that she would have no place to hide, no place to run and absolutely no help available.

Furthermore, duty as well as common sense obligates the police to call ahead to the next town in the direction they had to assume she was heading. They knew they had not passed her as they drove east to the accident site during their response to the “911” call. The Woodstock police were not notified nor asked to send an officer to intercept her by driving west in the direction in which she was approaching.

She was figuratively and nearly literally “right there” readily available to be rescued and saved from whatever fate has befallen her. All that the police had to do was to expend minimal mental and physical effort and my daughter, Maura would be safely here with me today. But, unfortunately, the police neglected to make even the most basic effort to find her, and I remain without her now and perhaps forever.

The onus of this irresponsible and possibly fatal lack of action lies not only with the North Haverhill force, but also with the New Hampshire State Police who responded to the “911” calls from the neighbors as well.

Recently, nearly three (3) months after the accident, a motorist who was driving west on Route 112 at about 8:00 PM on February 9 reported seeing a young person acting furtively heading very fast in an easterly direction at a point about four (4) to five (5) miles away from the scene of the crash. The time line and description of the individual’s appearance and clothing fits perfectly for this person to have been Maura.

This witness lives within just yards of the accident site, but said he had been confused about the exact date and time of that event because the state police had not interviewed him until 10 days had passed. As hard as this is to believe, it is actually true since an investigator helping the family questioned him on Sunday, February 15 and he said the police hadn’t been there to talk to him yet. At this point I appealed directly to the state police to pay attention to rudimentary procedure and turned our notes over to them. This apparently prompted a belated response which led to the questioning of this witness on Thursday, February 19.

That this nearly immediately located neighbor who could have been a prime source of critical information should have been questioned in a timely fashion on the very evening of the accident or, at the latest, on the following day is a fully reasonable expectation of adequate investigative policy. If this had occurred this person would have had immediate recollection of the sighting of my daughter and a “hot lead” would have ensued.

Statistics, which are very well known by state police agencies, indicate that cases get solved from tips received in the first two or three days or they can go cold forever. To wait ten days to speak to such an obvious source of potentially crucial information based on his proximity to the event will be hard to explain even for those adept at this skill. It is no wonder that the state police are reluctant to release to me their accident report to which I am probably legally entitled.

I get nearly physically sick when I wake up each morning and the thought of how really little effort it would have taken to rescue my daughter automatically flashes through my mind.

It has been over three months since her disappearance and the only leads developed have been handed to the state police by others. Yet still these guys maintain that they don’t need any help. The FBI offered its assistance during the opening week of this case but have only been utilized in a very minor way such as interviewing family members and high school friends in Maura’s hometown of Hanson, MA, and also a couple of college acquaintances.

These state police officers are great people personally, and I like them and respect them. They are the type of men and women that both you and I would be very pleased to have living in our own neighborhoods, but the inescapable reality remains that they clearly need help in finding Maura.

The finest resource in the world is available and you, sir, should direct Lieutenant John Scarinza and Troop F to accept its offer. There are corollary cases in Vermont also and this entire situation begs for central co-ordination and investigation by an agency which is not bound by the confines of the configuration of Grafton County and the Connecticut River.

The young women in the northern region of your state are not safe and it is clearly imperative that you act decisively before you lose another. Deep within themselves, your citizens are nervously apprehensive and anxiously awaiting your response to this threat.

Respectfully,

Fred Murray

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Newspaper Articles # 99
« Reply #99 on: December 12, 2019, 04:09:54 pm »
Portsmouth Herald

May 28, 2004

Missing woman’s father asks gov. to get FBI help

CONCORD (AP) — The father of a missing University of Massachusetts nursing student has asked Gov. Craig Benson for help to get the FBI involved in the case.

Fred Murray of Weymouth, Mass., wants the governor to urge New Hampshire State Police to call in the FBI for help in finding Maura Murray.

She has been missing since the evening of Feb. 9 after a minor accident in which she failed to make a curve on Route 112 outside Haverhill.

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Newspaper Articles # 100
« Reply #100 on: December 12, 2019, 04:11:57 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

May 29, 2004

FBI Involved In Investigation - Brianna Maitland Disappearance

Gary E. Lindsley

Experts from the FBI's Behavioral Sciences Laboratory in Quantico, Va., are involved in the investigation of the disappearance of 17-year-old Brianna Maitland.

Maitland, who lives in Sheldon, Vt., has not been seen nor heard from since she clocked out of work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery around 11:30 p.m. March 19.

William McSalis, a supervisory senior agent in the FBI's Burlington office, confirmed late Friday afternoon the FBI is involved in the Maitland case.

In fact, McSalis said the FBI has been working closely with Vermont State Police nearly since the inception of the case.

Maitland's car was found early the morning of March 20 partially ensconced in an abandoned building about a mile from the tavern where she worked.

She left two paychecks behind in the car.

Bruce and Kellie Maitland, along with Fred Murray, father of 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray, have been demanding the state police in both Vermont and New Hampshire bring in the FBI to find their daughters.

Maura Murray disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after being involved in a minor, one-car accident on rural Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

McSalis said he could not say whether the FBI is involved in the Murray case as well. FBI officials in Boston could not be reached for comment Friday.

Regarding the Maitland disappearance, McSalis said the FBI was contacted by Vermont State Police not long after it was determined Maitland was missing.

Since then, and most importantly, he said, the behavioral sciences group from Quantico has been reviewing what has been done in the case by Vermont State Police.

FBI experts, who also can be called profilers, are using the information supplied by state police to see if it matches up with similar cases elsewhere in the country.

McSalis said a lot of work has been done so far by the group from Quantico. However, he would not discuss what evidence, if any, has been reviewed nor whether any FBI agents have visited Vermont and the accident scene because it is an on-going investigation.

McSalis also would not confirm published media reports that the team would soon be headed not only to Vermont for the Maitland case, but also to New Hampshire to investigate the Murray disappearance.

"We are working closely with the Vermont Sate Police," he said. "We don't want to go into details."

Lee Pugh, a spokesman from the FBI's Albany, N.Y., office, said he knows the Vermont State Police have conducted a very through investigation.

"We have been monitoring the case," Pugh said. "The full services of the FBI have been utilized to some degree."

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Newspaper Articles # 101
« Reply #101 on: December 12, 2019, 04:14:00 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

May 31, 2004

Another Vermont Woman Reported Missing - Police Find Her Jeep

By Gary E. Lindsley

Lamoille County authorities are asking for the public's help in finding a 35-year-old Johnson woman who hasn't been seen since Thursday morning -- the third woman to disappear in Northern New England since Feb. 9.

Jodie Whitney, who has a 3-year-old child, was last seen by her husband, Edgar, before he left for work Thursday morning. She not only failed to show up for work at Stoweflake Resort in Stowe, but she also did not return home.

Like the two other women who are missing, Whitney is described as a petite woman.

On Feb. 9, 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray disappeared after she was involved in a minor one-car accident on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H.

A little more than a month later, 17-year-old Brianna Maitland of Sheldon, Vt., disappeared after she left work at the Black Lantern Inn in Montgomery late the night of March 19. Maitland's vehicle was found about a mile from the Black Lantern Inn, partially ensconced inside an abandoned building.

Sheriff Roger Marcoux said Whitney's white Jeep Cherokee was found within a 5-mile radius of her home by a citizen Friday afternoon.

Marcoux is not releasing where the vehicle was found because it's part of the ongoing investigation.

He said the vehicle is being looked at by a Vermont State Police crime lab team.

Kellie Maitland, Brianna's mother, was heartbroken to learn another woman had disappeared.

"I believe it's (the work of) a serial killer," Maitland said. "And the clock is ticking.

"One is too many," she went on to say. "Enough is enough! They (law enforcement) should pull out all the stops."

Marcoux said there isn't anything to lead investigators to believe there is any connection between Whitney's disappearance and the disappearances of Maitland and Murray.

"We have no evidence to tie them together at this point," he said.

Marcoux said police are conducting a missing person's investigation into Whitney's disappearance because nothing so far has indicated a criminal act has been committed.

He said Whitney is a reservations supervisor at Stoweflake Resort. She was supposed to be at work at 8 a.m.

When she had not returned home by 10 p.m. Thursday, her husband reported her missing.

"This is very out of character for her," Marcoux said. "She seems to be a very responsible person ... she has a young 3-year-old child at home."

Co-workers and members of Whitney's family have been interviewed, he said.

"Everything seemed fine," Marcoux said, referring to Thursday morning when Whitney's husband last saw her.

Investigators are tracking down some leads. One, according to Marcoux, came from officials at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center.

They reported they had a woman in the hospital possibly fitting Whitney's description. Investigators went to Dartmouth, but the woman was not Whitney.

Marcoux said about 50 law enforcement officers and the New England canine team, led by Vermont State Police Search and Rescue, conducted a ground search Saturday of an area consisting of a 1-mile radius of where Whitney's vehicle was found.

That search area was expanded, but nothing was found. An aerial search was conducted Sunday.

Authorities also searched about 3 miles of the Gihon River.

Whitney is described as being 5-feet, 3-inches tall and weighing 110-pounds. She has shoulder-length brown hair and brown eyes.

People with any information about Whitney should call the Lamoille County Sheriff's Dept. at 802-888-3502.

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Newspaper Articles # 102
« Reply #102 on: December 12, 2019, 04:16:03 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

June 2, 2004

NH, Vt. bound by disappearances

By Wilson Ring

MONTPELIER, Vt. -- Investigators in Vermont are planning to meet with their counterparts in New Hampshire to compare notes after the third woman went missing in the region since February, a sheriff said.

The Lamoille County Sheriff's Department is working with the Vermont State Police in their search for Jodie Whitney, said Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux.

The only common thread between the cases is the vehicles, said Marcoux.

"We've got three women missing and in each case there has been an abandoned vehicle found," Marcoux said yesterday.

The latest case began last Thursday when the husband of 35-year-old Jodie Whitney of Johnson reported his wife missing. Marcoux said Whitney never arrived at her job on Thursday morning at the Stoweflake Resort in Stowe.

"This individual is a very reliable person. She doesn't miss work. She's never late. She has a supervisory position. She has a 3-year-old daughter at home," Marcoux said. "This is very out of character for her."

Whitney's car was found abandoned the next day. Marcoux wouldn't reveal where the car was found other than to say it was within five miles of her home.

Whitney is described as being 5-feet, 3-inches tall and weighing 110-pounds. She has shoulder-length brown hair and brown eyes.

Marcoux said he called the Vermont State Police and investigators started working on the case immediately.

"This is a joint investigation with the state police and if there are a lot of similarities, we are going to know it," Marcoux said. "We are pouring resources into it right from the get go."

The Whitney disappearance comes in the aftermath of the February disappearance of Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student who had a minor, single-vehicle traffic accident in Haverhill, N.H. On March 19, Brianna Maitland of Sheldon disappeared after leaving her job in Montgomery.

Haverhill is roughly 100 miles from Montgomery and Johnson is between the two, about 26 miles from Montgomery.

"I haven't seen any cases like this in Vermont," Marcoux said.

Marcoux says Vermont investigators will meet with New Hampshire detectives to see if any additional links can be found.

"The state police are in the process of contacting them. There is a meeting being scheduled with investigators from the three cases just to make sure we're not missing anything," he said.

Marcoux said it appeared to be coincidence that Whitney's mother Cheryl Peters was shot to death in Morrisville in 1994. No one has ever been charged in that case.

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Newspaper Articles # 103
« Reply #103 on: December 12, 2019, 04:18:06 pm »
Boston Globe

June 3, 2004

Police Say Husband Confesses in Slaying

New England in Brief / Hyde Park, VT.

The husband of a Johnson woman missing since last week has confessed to killing her, police said last night. Earlier in the day investigators discovered the body of a woman but officials said they could not positively identify it as that of Jodie Whitney. At a late- afternoon news conference held to announce the discovery of the body, Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux described Edgar Whitney as a suspect in the disappearance of his wife. Edgar Whitney tried to kill himself by overdosing on pills yesterday morning, said Marcoux. Marcoux said investigators were still looking for links between the cases of two other missing women from the region. Marcoux and a State Police detective were still planning to meet Friday with New Hampshire detectives to look for links between the cases. In February Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, disappeared after a minor car accident in Haverhill, N.H., about 75 miles from Johnson. In March, Brianna Maitland of Sheldon disappeared after leaving her job in Montgomery.

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Newspaper Articles # 104
« Reply #104 on: December 12, 2019, 04:20:10 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

June 3, 2004

Police Say Husband Confesses To Murder - Missing Woman's Body Believed Found

By Gary E. Lindsley

The husband of a missing 35-year-old Johnson woman has confessed to killing her, Vermont State Police said Wednesday evening. Police also announced that a woman's body, believed to be that of Jodie Whitney, had been found that afternoon.

Lt. Leo Bachand, the state police Troop B Criminal Division commander, said Edgar Whitney, while being interviewed at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington late Wednesday afternoon, confessed to killing his wife.

Whitney notified police around 10 p.m. May 27 that his wife, Jodie, had not returned home. She had not arrived to work at the Stoweflake Resort in Stowe that day. He reported last seeing her that morning before he left for work.

Jodie's white Jeep Cherokee was found by a citizen within a 5-mile radius of the Whitney home Friday.

Authorities from the Lamoille County Sheriff's Department, state police Search and Rescue Team, the state police Criminal Division, and police officers from Stowe and Morrisville, have been working together to find Jodie, according to Bachand.

Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux, during a press conference in front of the Lamoille County Courthouse late Wednesday afternoon, said the pace of the investigation was stepped up after authorities received a phone call that Edgar had taken some pills. Authorities are not releasing what the pills were.

"Right now, he is our best suspect," Marcoux said.

Bachand said family members called for an ambulance around 6:30 Wednesday morning after Edgar had taken an overdose of pills.

Edgar was first taken to Copley Hospital in Morrisville after overdosing before being transferred to Fletcher Allen Health Care.

According to Marcoux, it was information from family members which led to the discovery of what they believe to be Jodie's body.

He would not say what had happened between Tuesday night and Wednesday which led him and other investigators to believe Edgar was involved in his wife's disappearance.

While Marcoux was holding a press conference late Wednesday afternoon about Edgar Whitney's apparent suicide attempt Wednesday morning, and the finding of a woman's body during the afternoon, Edgar was confessing to killing his wife, Bachand said.

Wednesday afternoon, according to Bachand, at 1:45, a search team of about 25 combed an area beyond the original 5-mile radius already searched. They found the body of a woman at 2:03 p.m. who Bachand said was believed to be that of Jodie. He said the body matched Jodie's description.

Marcoux said a positive identification is pending.

After the press conference Wednesday, Marcoux would not say exactly where the body was found. He also said more information about the cause of death will be available once an autopsy is conducted.

Both Marcoux and Bachand said they had not seen the body because once it was discovered, the crime scene was sealed off to everyone except for the Vermont State Police crime lab team.

The body, according to Bachand was found deep in the woods, a ways off "the beaten path."

Bachand said Medical Examiner Paul Morrow will be conducting the autopsy in Burlington this morning.

Marcoux said he did not know if Edgar had a criminal record. And when asked whether there was a history of domestic violence in the Whitneys' marriage, he would not comment.

However, later Wednesday, Bachand said there was a restraining order requested against Edgar Whitney last year but was withdrawn. He said the information is available in court records.

Edgar, he said, is still in the hospital. As of Wednesday night, charges had not been filed. Bachand said State Attorney Joel Page will decide what charges to file once the investigation is complete. An arraignment, if there is one, will take place at the Lamoille County Courthouse.

Prior to the discovery of the body, Edgar's overdose and his alleged confession, Marcoux and Bachand had set up a meeting for 10 a.m. Friday with New Hampshire State Police and FBI agents to discuss the disappearances of Jodie Whitney, Brianna Maitland and Maura Murray.

On Sunday, Marcoux said there wasn't any indication Jodie's disappearance was tied to the disappearances of 22-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Murray and 17-year-old Maitland of Sheldon, Vt.

Although Marcoux and Bachand now do not believe there is any connection between the three cases, the meeting will still proceed at the Lamoille County Sheriff's Department office.

"We want to keep the other cases in the spotlight," Marcoux said. Bachand agreed. He said it is important to have everyone together talking about the cases.

Besides Bachand, also assisting Marcoux and his department with the Whitney investigation are Sgt. Tim Clouatre and Detective Bob Cushing, both from the St. Johnsbury area.

 

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