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Author Topic: Newspaper Articles  (Read 3037 times)

fulkstop

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Newspaper Articles # 60
« Reply #60 on: December 10, 2019, 09:30:35 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise

April 12, 2004

Parents skeptical of psychic’s analysis

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) — The parents of a Massachusetts woman missing in northern New Hampshire for two months reacted with skepticism to a psychic profiler’s belief that the young woman was abducted and killed. Maura Murray’s father, Fred, contacted the California psychic and is unsure if he believes her, but the missing woman’s mother says she is disregarding Carla Baron’s belief that Maura Murray was the victim of a serial killer.

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Newspaper Articles # 61
« Reply #61 on: December 12, 2019, 01:39:13 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 14, 2004

Family, Friends Warned About Trespassing - Missing Woman

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL, NH - The investigation into the disappearance of 21-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student Maura Murray has encountered an odd twist.

Fred Murray, Maura's father, has been warned that he, other family members, friends and canine search teams face possible arrest if they trespass on private property in an area surrounding the site of Maura's accident.

Maura, a Hanson, Mass., resident and junior at the UMass Amherst campus, disappeared after she was involved in a one-car accident the night of Feb. 9 on Route 112 in Haverhill, about a mile east of Swiftwater. Fred Murray received a letter, dated April 2, from Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams warning against trespassing.

Williams states in his letter his department has received a written request from area residents complaining about repeated trespassing and parking problems on their properties.

"While they are sympathetic with the cause to find Maura, the right to quiet enjoyment of their personal property has been repeatedly and blatantly disregarded to the point that they now must insist that absolutely no one has permission to trespass on their properties," Williams wrote Murray.

The property owners, according to Williams, are specifically excluding the following from their parking lots and properties: Murray family members, friends and relatives of Maura Murray; volunteer searchers and canine handlers; private investigators; members of the press; and anyone else seeking clues or searching for Maura Murray.

"The Haverhill Police Department will honor their wishes to remove unwanted vehicles and/or ask trespassers to leave immediately," Williams wrote in his letter. "Repeat offenders will be arrested." Thank you for your understanding and cooperation in this matter." Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Maura's boyfriend, was flabbergasted when she learned about the letter.

"I am amazed!" Rausch exclaimed. "He gets a written note, not a phone call, that he will be arrested. It's callous. I think it's callous to put something like this in writing."

Murray said if residents living in the area of Maura's accident have been offended by people searching for his daughter, he is certainly sorry. "I have not tried to cause any problems," he said.

However, Murray believes the true intent of Williams' letter is police are trying to discourage any independent searches for Maura. He also believes it is an attempt to reduce the amount of publicity Maura's disappearance has been receiving. "We have all the interviews we have wanted to do," he said. "I think it's an overreaction on the part of the police department."

If people are upset because of the search for his daughter, though, Murray said he will personally apologize to them. It's much to do about nothing," he said. "We are not worried. We will continue to act responsibly and look for my daughter."

Williams, when contacted Tuesday, would not say when the complaints were filed nor would he divulge how many were submitted to the police department.

The past several weeks of police reports from his department have not indicated there were any trespassing complaints in the area of Maura's accident. Williams said none were noted because he didn't want the people's names known.

"They have been through enough," he said, referring to property owners. "If people are caught on people's properties they will be asked to leave. We will follow the law."

In addition to trespassing, he said people have been blocking vehicles in private driveways. As law enforcers, Williams said police are forced to protect property owners.

"If my daughter was missing, I wouldn't be happy until she was found," he said. "I understand their frustration. Hopefully, we will get to a successful conclusion where Maura is alive."

When asked if he would contact Los Angeles, Calif., psychic profiler Carla Baron regarding any information she may have regarding the case, Williams said, "We don't deal directly with psychics. We deal in evidence."

He did say, though, if she has information regarding Maura, his department will follow up on it.

Baron has claimed she believes Maura "is no longer with us" and may have fallen victim to someone who has killed other women. She also has information about the person's description, vehicle he drives and area where she may be found.

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Newspaper Articles # 62
« Reply #62 on: December 12, 2019, 01:41:07 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Nashua Telegraph / Caldeonian Record

April 15, 2004

Residents warn searchers

HAVERHILL (AP) - Family members of Maura Murray, a Massachusetts student who disappeared following a minor car accident in New Hampshire, have been warned by police that they could be arrested if they trespass on property surrounding the accident site.

Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams said in an April 2 letter to Murray’s father that his department has received a written request from area residents complaining about repeated trespassing and parking problems.

Williams said the property owners also are excluding friends and relatives of Maura Murray; volunteer searchers, canine handlers, private investigators, media, and others seeking clues or searching for her.

Murray, a 21-yearold Hanson, Mass., resident and junior at the U niversity of Massachusetts, disappeared after she was involved in a one-car accident the night of Feb. 9 on Route 112 in Haverhill.

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Newspaper Articles # 63
« Reply #63 on: December 12, 2019, 01:42:52 pm »
Boston Globe

April 16, 2004

N.H. Police Consult Psychic on Missing Woman

By Peter DeMarco

New Hampshire State Police interviewed a California psychic yesterday who says she had visions of a man abducting Maura Murray, the Hanson native who disappeared in February after a minor car crash on a rural New Hampshire road.

Lieutenant John Scarinza, the lead investigator, said he spoke with psychic profiler Carla Baron and plans to talk to her again, but he did not share details of their conversation.

Baron, a nationally known psychic, told Fred Murray that she believes his daughter was abducted and killed. Baron said the visions indicated that Murray was buried near another woman abducted by the same man.

Scarinza said authorities would consider Baron's psychic visions as they would any other tip.

"Mr. Murray has asked us if we could listen to what this woman has to say. We're not close-minded to talking to anyone," he said.

Baron was profiled last night on ABC's "Primetime Thursday." She has aided numerous police departments in missing persons and homicide cases.

More than a dozen psychics have called New Hampshire State Police offering assistance with the Murray case, Scarinza said. But Murray's father has only asked police to speak with Baron.

Meanwhile, the police chief in Haverhill, N.H., where Maura Murray was last seen, has warned her family members that they could be arrested if they trespass on property surrounding the accident site, according to the Associated Press. Police Chief Jeff Williams said in an April 2 letter to Murray's father that his department has received a written request from area residents complaining about repeated trespassing and parking problems, the AP reported.

Murray's family believes that the 21-year-old woman, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was abducted by someone who offered her a ride just minutes before police responded to a 911 call about her car accident. Authorities have found no evidence of foul play and say they have been unable to determine where she was headed at the time of the accident. Investigators plan to conduct further aerial searches of the wooded area in Woodsville, N.H., where Murray crashed into a snowbank on Feb. 9, Scarinza said.

State Police and New Hampshire Fish and Game officials, along with a team of dogs, are preparing for another "line search" of the area in hopes of finding any of Murray's belongings, such as a backpack, that were apparently missing from her car, he said.

While similar searches have already been made, Scarinza said, "We don't want to leave anything to chance."

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Newspaper Articles # 64
« Reply #64 on: December 12, 2019, 01:44:46 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 20, 2004

Residents Dispute Claims They Want Trespassers Arrested

By Gary E. Lindsley

Haverhill, NH -- People living in the area near where a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst student went missing dispute police claims they filed complaints regarding the woman's father, relatives and searchers.

Haverhill Police Chief Jeff Williams sent a letter recently to Maura Murray's father, Fred, notifying him that anyone, including Fred, his family, friends, searchers and reporters, would face arrest if they continued trespassing on Haverhill residents' properties.

Maura was traveling east along Route 112 when her black 1996 Saturn failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve near The Weathered Barn the night of Feb. 9. She disappeared before police arrived and hasn't been seen since.

Steve Loud lives on Maguire Road, just west of The Weathered Barn. Claims the neighbors living near the accident site had gathered together to file complaints with Haverhill Police were not true, he said.

Chief Williams has refused to say when the complaints were filed as well as how many have been filed.

"The one neighbor wrote the letter saying it was all the neighbors," Loud said Monday. "It's just the people down by the barn."

He said he has told people at the Stage Coach Stop, a convenience store about a mile west of the accident site, to tell anyone wanting to look for Maura they could search his property.

"I said they can park on my land," Loud said. "I will do anything I can to help. We have been all around this hill. We didn't see any tracks."

Another neighbor, John Boutilier, also said he will do anything he can to help find Maura.

"I don't care if they come on our land," Boutilier said. "I don't have any problem with that. I think it's a most stressful situation for (Fred Murray)."

Searching people's properties, he said, certainly isn't going to hurt anyone. "It makes you wonder if someone has something to hide."

Ann Loud of Woodsville, who was visiting Steve Loud on Monday, said if she lived in the area, she would not complain about people searching for Maura.

"That's not how our community is," she said.

Faith Westman, who owns The Weathered Barn and lives across the road from it in a white house, did file a complaint with Haverhill Police about people parking their cars in the parking lot next to The Weathered Barn.

Westman said she also complained about people traipsing on her property.

"After two months, what are they looking for?" she asked. "Have we not covered enough? We really debated about saying something. We really can sympathize with the family."

Every time the police have parked near her barn or searched her property, she said, they have asked permission first to do so.

"The family has never consulted us," Westman said.

In talking about the night of the accident, she said she called it in to police.

Westman said she saw Butch Atwood, a school bus driver who lives about 100 yards east of the accident scene, stop and check on Maura.

She said she saw Maura get out of her vehicle and talk to Atwood. However, once she saw Atwood talking to Maura, she did not continue watching what was going on.

"We never suspected she would disappear," Westman said. "When the police came to our door and asked if she had come in, we were dumbfounded. I can't even imagine losing someone like that. There isn't any closure."

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Newspaper Articles # 65
« Reply #65 on: December 12, 2019, 01:46:38 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 20, 2004

State Police Conduct Second Air Search

By Gary E. Lindsley

Members of New Hampshire State Police Troop F were back in the air on Monday searching for Maura Murray.

Murray disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after being involved in a one-car crash on Route 112 in Haverhill, about one mile east of Swiftwater.

A state police helicopter, hovering at treetop level, battled stiff winds Monday as passengers Detective Todd Landry and Lt. Wayne Fortier searched the ground below them.

They slowly searched areas on both sides of Route 112. At times, it appeared the helicopter wasn't even moving as it hovered over a hilly area south of Murray's accident site.

School bus driver and nearby resident Butch Atwood was the last known person to see her alive. After the crash, he offered to call police and EMS for her, but he said she asked him not to.

He went to his house anyway to call for help. Between the time he went the 100 yards to his house and the time Haverill Police Department Sgt. Cecil Smith arrived, Murray had disappeared. She hasn't been seen since.

Her cell phone, bank account and credit cards have not been used since the accident.

Troop F Lt. John Scarinza said Monday the helicopter team was searching an area that has been searched previously, but which until now had been covered by snow. The team searched the river area and Bradley Hill Road areas as well as other side roads.

"We certainly wanted to take this opportunity since the snow was off the ground," Scarinza said.

He didn't know if the air search would continue today.

"It depends on how much area was covered," Scarinza said.

Flying at treetop level, investigators could see a lot of detail, he said, especially since the helicopter was flying so slow.

"It's time-consuming," Scarinza said, adding that investigators will search additional areas on foot. He didn't know when the ground search would be conducted, but believed it would be soon.

Not only state police, but also members of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department will be taking part in the ground search. Area fire departments may also be called in to help search.

Scarinza said investigators won't be asking for volunteers because the purpose of the search will be to locate any possible evidence.

Regarding psychic profiler Carla Baron, Scarinza said Troop F investigators have spoken to her about the Murray disappearance.

"We spoke with her several days before her TV special," he said, referring to the psychic's appearance on "Primetime" last week. "We in good faith did speak to her."

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Newspaper Articles # 66
« Reply #66 on: December 12, 2019, 01:48:30 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 21, 2004

Father Of Missing Sheldon Girl Worried About Others' Safety

By Gary E. Lindsley

Bruce Maitland is worried about the safety of teenage girls and young women in Vermont and New Hampshire - worried they may face the possibility of being kidnapped and transported elsewhere for illicit purposes.

Maitland's daughter, 17-year-old Brianna, disappeared after she left work at the Black Lantern in Montgomery the night of March 19.

"My own theory," Maitland said Tuesday night, "is there may be a market for these girls in the New York City area. I have some inclination of it."

He also believes there may be a connection between the disappearances of his daughter and that of Maura Murray, a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student from Hanson, Mass.

Murray disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

Brianna disappeared after she left work as a dishwasher at the Black Lantern. Her car was found during the early morning hours of March 20 with its rear end ensconced in a portion of an abandoned building, about a mile from the Black Lantern.

"I do believe there is some form of link," Maitland said.

He also said Vermont State Police investigators haven't ruled out a connection, although VSP and New Hampshire State Police investigators have officially told the media they don't believe there is any connection.

Maitland said state police are investigating the possibility teenage girls and young women are being taken for illegal purposes, such as prostitution in the New York City area.

He said there was a case of underage girls being used for such purposes recently in the Hampstead area.

"We know these guys are coming up from New York City," Maitland said. "It's very scary! The connection may not be with a random person. They could be part of a cell."

"In that case," he added, referring to both Brianna and Murray being alive, "there could be a glimmer of hope."

Maitland said he has spoken to detectives in the New York City area about his daughter. He also has visited police precincts there, including the Bronx. And pictures of his daughter have been distributed in the New York City area.

"They gave me some great confidence," he said. "They felt very strongly they would be able to find her if she is on the streets."

Maitland said someone in Burlington had been taking girls from the area to New York City for prostitution in the past.

"So, the market does exist," he said. "It certainly is a reason for the entire community to be upset and to be very careful about their daughters."

Maitland also spoke about a letter he and his wife, Kellie, had sent to Gov. Jim Douglas regarding their belief not enough was being done to find Brianna.

He faxed the letter to Douglas' office Friday.

"Yesterday we got a response," he said.

The Maitlands spent about two hours talking with VSP Tuesday.

"We were unhappy because we hadn't seen any results," he said.

The Maitlands also felt like they were being shut out by investigators. They weren't receiving any information about what was being done to find their daughter. Nor were they receiving any information on what had been learned.

After speaking with state police, Maitland said he believes investigators are desperately searching for evidence and clues that will lead them to Brianna.

"We got a real lesson in procedures," he said. "Certain mistakes were made. They wouldn't directly admit that."

However, he said certain other measures were taken to move the investigation forward which he and Kellie did not know about.

Although the Maitlands feel better coming out of Tuesday's meeting, they still aren't happy.

"I am not satisfied with the results," he said. "I want my daughter back."

The Maitlands will meet once a week with VSP to discuss the latest developments in the case.

Jason Gibbs, Douglas' press secretary, said the governor understands the family's concerns.

"He has been assured we are doing everything we can to bring this young woman home safely," Gibbs said. "The family has been briefed on what information can be shared and what can't be."

While wanting to keep the family informed, he said investigators don't want to provide information which will compromise the investigation.

People with information about Maitland should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.

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Newspaper Articles # 67
« Reply #67 on: December 12, 2019, 01:50:22 pm »
The Providence Journal

April 22, 2004

State police to resume ground search for missing girl

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) - Another ground search is planned soon for a Massachusetts college student missing since Feb. 9 after she crashed her car.

State police Lt. John Scarinza said searchers will be out in the accident area in a few weeks before the leaves come out on trees, which makes sightings more difficult.

State police searched the area in a helicopter Monday for any sign of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., a University of Massachusetts student, who had packed up all her belongings at school before she disappeared.

Murray, who didn't tell her family or anyone at school where she was going, was driving east along Route 112 when she failed to make a sharp left hand curve. She was unhurt, but disappeared before police arrived and hasn't been seen or heard from since. Scarinza said the area leads into rugged, mountainous terrain that covers many miles.

Scarinza said state police have talked to Vermont State Police about a girl missing in Vermont to see if there might be a connection, but "based on what we know, there does not seem to be any correlation whatever."

Murray's family has spent considerable time searching the area and asking people in New Hampshire and bordering Vermont if they had seen her.

The woman's father, Fred Murray, still searches every weekend. "I'm happy the police are doing what they can," he said. He said the pledged reward money for information leading to her safe return has reached $40,000. He said he thinks she might have been abducted by someone who lives in the area. Scarinza said it is a possibility.

"Until we know the answer, I would never say that that's not possible, but ... there's no evidence to suggest that," he said.

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Newspaper Articles # 68
« Reply #68 on: December 12, 2019, 01:52:14 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 22, 2004

Letters To Editor

Something to hide?

To the Editor:

Just read the article regarding the Maura Murray family being warned about trespassing and being threatened with arrest.

Sounds to me like someone has something to hide and I am appalled that the police would buy into it. Especially as far as not letting the family know what property owners are going to charge them with trespassing, so they know where not to go.

That letter pretty much ends any type of investigation that might be done the way that it is worded. I have not been impressed with the overall response of the police and this just adds to it.

Robert S. Farnham

Alton Bay, N.H.

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Newspaper Articles # 69
« Reply #69 on: December 12, 2019, 01:54:06 pm »
Boston Herald / The New Hampshire Union Leader / Unidentified / Nashua Telegraph

April 21/22, 2004

Notes: Unidentified newspaper has an alternative headline in italics.

New search for student finds nothing

Mystery <> UMass student has been missing since Feb. 9 car crash.

Witnesses say Maura Murray was involved in a traffic accident prior to her disappearance

HAVERHILL (AP) - Another search for a missing University of Massachusetts student has failed to turn up any sign of her whereabouts.

State police in a helicopter searched the Haverhill area on Monday. That’s where Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., was last seen the night of Feb. 9.

Lt. John Scarinza said the area had been searched before, but had been covered with snow. He said he did not know exactly when ground searchers would go back into the woods.

Murray’s family has spent considerable time searching the area and asking people in New Hampshire and bordering Vermont if they had seen her.

Murray, who didn’t tell her family or anyone at school where she was going, was driving east along Route 112 when she failed to make a sharp left hand curve near The Weathered Barn and crashed. She was unhurt, but disappeared before police arrived and hasn’t been seen or heard from since.

Her cell phone, bank account and credit cards have not been used since the accident.

Meanwhile, people living in the area disputed a police report that they had filed complaints about family and friends trespassing on their property while searching.

“The one neighbor wrote the letter saying it was all the neighbors,” said Steve Loud, who lives near The Weathered Barn. “I said they can park on my land,” Loud said. “I will do anything I can to help.” Another neighbor, John Boutilier, also said he will do anything he can to help find the woman. “I don’t care if they come on our land,” Boutilier said. “I don’t have any problem with that. I think it’s a most stressful situation for (Fred Murray).”

Faith Westman, who owns The Weathered Barn and lives across the road from it, filed a complaint with Haverhill police about people parking their cars in the parking lot next to the barn. She said she also complained about people walking on her property. “After two months, what are they looking for?” she said. “Have we not covered enough? We really debated about saying something. We really can sympathize with the family.”

Every time the police have parked near her barn or searched her property, they asked permission first, she said.

“The family has never consulted us,” Westman said.

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Newspaper Articles # 70
« Reply #70 on: December 12, 2019, 01:55:58 pm »
The Caldedonian-Record

Tuesday, April 27, 2004

Missing Woman's Dad Urges Public's Help - Wants Aid Getting FBI Involved

By Gary E. Lindsley

Maura Murray's father wants people to become involved in his quest to have the FBI join the investigation into his daughter's disappearance.

Murray's father, Fred, and other relatives have long clamored for the FBI to play an expansive role in the search for Maura.

Maura disappeared after she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, about a mile east of Swiftwater, the night of Feb. 9.

She hasn't been seen since. And her ATM card, credit card, bank account and cell phone have not been used since her disappearance.

"I am asking for (people living in Vermont and New Hampshire) to contact the FBI and ask them to become involved," Murray said. "None of the young women in Vermont and New Hampshire are safe. This could happen again."

The discovery of a woman's body in a swampy area of Manchester, N.H., Saturday, Murray said, is even more reason to have the FBI involved.

Sgt. Nick Willard of the Manchester Police Department would not say Monday whether the woman has been identified.

Willard said the woman's identity will be released once the next of kin have been identified.

He said the New Hampshire State Attorney General's Office will be having a press conference today regarding the discovery of the woman. Members of the Attorney General's Office could not be reached for comment Monday afternoon. Murray is concerned about a Vermont woman's disappearance as well.

Brianna Maitland is a 17-year-old who disappeared the night of March 19 after leaving her job at the Black Lantern in Montgomery.

Murray, like Brianna's father, Bruce, does not understand how state police in both states have ruled out any connection between the disappearance of their daughters.

"They said the victims did not know one another," Murray said. "I told them the connection isn't between the victims, but the perpetrator. I asked (New Hampshire State Police) why not let the FBI decide whether there is a connection. Also, there may be an Upper Valley murders connection." He was referring to a series of murders which occurred in the late 1980s.

"They said they have all the resources they need," Murray said, referring to state police. "I told them they are not getting the job done. They said they are. And I said they weren't because they have not found Maura." Murray has suggested the state police conduct a search of areas off of Route 112 on Route 116.

"I asked them to do a direct appeal to the public," he said. "They said they will wait until May." Murray told them that wasn't acceptable. Waiting another month will make it more than three months since Maura disappeared.

"I would think people other than the Maitlands and us would be screaming for the FBI," he said. "We don't want to wait for another body to disappear. There's an unidentified guy still out there. You have another potential horrendous situation."

Murray also is asking for help from residents living in the area where his daughter's accident happened to become involved because he believes a local person may have been involved in Maura's disappearance. "Like it takes a thief to catch a thief, it takes a local to catch a local," he said.

A $40,000 reward is being offered for any information leading to finding Maura. Maura's Web site is http://www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.

The Maitlands have announced they are offering a $10,000 reward for finding their daughter.

The Maitlands have created the Web site http://www.bringbrihome.org as a way to help find their daughter.

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Newspaper Articles # 71
« Reply #71 on: December 12, 2019, 01:57:50 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 30, 2004

Ceremony Planned For Murray Accident Site Public Urged To Attend

By Gary E. Lindsley

Family and friends of missing University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray will hold a special Circle of Hope ceremony simultaneously throughout parts of the country at 1 p.m., Sunday.

Murray, who is from Hanson, Mass., has been missing since she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9.

Her father, Fred, will be joined by Jennifer Henry of Essex, Vt., and Leslie Grima of Franconia, N.H., for a ceremony at the accident site Sunday.

Simultaneous ceremonies will be held by Maura's boyfriend, Billy Rausch, in Lawton, Okla.; Rausch's parents, Bill and Sharon, in Marengo, Ohio; friends and family in Hanson; friends at UMass at Amherst; and by her sister, Julie, in Fort Bragg, N.C.

Twenty-two blue balloons, signifying Maura's 22nd birthday Tuesday, will be released at each site.

There also will be blue ribbons, buttons and a large laminated photograph of Maura.

Sharon Rausch said blue ribbons and balloons are being used because blue is Maura's favorite color.

At the accident site, there will be a large laminated photo of Maura. And Henry hopes to tie a blue ribbon around the tree where Maura had her accident.

Maura left her Amherst dorm the afternoon of Feb. 9, driving a black 1996 Saturn, which Rausch said was not operating on all of its cylinders.

As Maura rounded a sharp left-hand curve past The Weathered Barn in the town of Haverhill, she lost control of her car and went off the right side of the highway into some trees, causing minor damage.

Butch Atwood, a school bus driver, was returning home from taking students on a skiing trip when he spotted Murray's car.

He offered her assistance and said he would call police and emergency medical services for her, but she asked him not to.

Atwood, who lived about 100 yards east of the accident site, said Maura did not appear intoxicated.

He drove up to his house to call police and EMS. Between the seven to nine minutes he left Maura and Haverhill Police Sgt. Cecil Smith arrived, Maura disappeared. She has not been seen nor heard from since.

May 9 will mark three months since Maura disappeared.

Her father said he will be releasing the blue balloons and "hope for the best."

He said the balloon casting and Circle of Hope ceremony is going to be symbolic. He is hoping others, including area residents, join him for the ceremony.

However, he also is asking people not to park in the driveway of The Weathered Barn nor people's driveways.

The Rev. Lyn McIntosh will be leading the Circle of Hope ceremony at the accident site.

Grima said she has become involved in the ceremony and search because she is a nurse.

"It's just something I believe in," she said, referring to the search for Maura. "I think it's awful things aren't happening quicker."

Her sister, Jennifer Henry, also is a nurse.

Henry will be bringing ribbons not only symbolic of Maura, but also of Brianna Maitland, 17, Sheldon, Vt., who disappeared after her own car accident in Montgomery, Vt., the night of March 19.

Henry also has been involved in trying to help find Maura. She laments the fact she disappeared so far from home.

"If one of my children went missing in another town, I wouldn't have the hometown advantage ... support," she said.

She noted how hundreds of people have come out to help search for Brianna, which has not been the case for Maura.

"We want to get the local people involved," Henry said.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 72
« Reply #72 on: December 12, 2019, 01:59:42 pm »
Seventeen Magazine

About May 2004

Girl Still Missing One cold winter night, Maura, 21, just picked up and left her college campus-and vanished without a trace.

Route 112 near Haverhill, New Hampshire, has lots of twists and turns, but none are quite as wicked as the 90-degree swerve across from the Weathered Barn, a dilapidated former antiques store.

And at 7:30 P.M. on February 9, 2004, Maura Murray, 21, found out just how difficult it can be to navigate that tum when she completely missed it.

Maura's '96 Saturn careened off the road into the woods, barely missing a tree. She was fine. The car wasn't. The radiator was damaged, and the wheels sank into a few feet of packed snow. About five minutes later, a school bus drove by. Butch Atwood, the driver, was off-duty and headed to his cabin just up the road. "Are you okay?" he shouted to Maura in her car. "Should I call AAA?" Maura rolled down her window and shivered from the 12-degree chill. She mumbled that she'd already called AAA for a tow. Atwood thought she seemed like she'd been drinking. "Okay," he said, "I'll call the police and fire department. Why don't you come to my house? You can get warm and wait there."

"No," Maura replied firmly, "I'll wait here."

Atwood thought it was pouible that Maura might have been scared of him-he weighs 350 pounds and has a grizzled beard -so he didn't press the point.

Instead, he drove the 100 yards to his cabin and called the police himself. About 15 minutes later, Atwood saw the police pull up to Maura's car.

When they looked inside, they found an open can of Skyy Blue malt liquor in the front seat. In the back was a suitcase filled with clothes; a stuffed monkey and a diamond necklace that her boyfriend, Bill Rausch, had given to her; two textbooks; and another book-Not Without Peril, an account of people who died climbing New Hampshire's Mount Washington, bookmarked at a chapter titled ''A Question of Life or Death."

But Maura was nowhere in sight.

TAKING OFF

No one knows where Maura was going three hours earlier when she got into her car at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where she was a junior studying nursing. She didn't tell her friends, her family, or her boyfriend that she was leaving campus at all.

The only thing she said to Bill, in an e-mail she'd sent at 1 P.M. that day (after she'd failed to return his two phone calls and an e-mail he sent the previous day) was, "i love you more stud. i got your messages, but honestly, i didn't feel like talking to much of anyone, i promise to call today though. Love you." Four hours after she e-mailed Bill, Maura did write a note to her boss at the campus art gallery before she took off.

In it, she said that she had a family emergency and had to go out of town for a week. According to the police report, she had also checked out information about Stowe Mountain and printed out directions to Burlington, Vermont (which is in the opposite direction from where she'd crashed). Then she packed her stuff, left her dorm, took $280 out of an ATM, bought a can of Skyy Blue and a bottle of red wine at a liquor store, got in her car-and started driving.

EARLY WARNING

Maura had always seemed like she had it all together. She was ranked fourth in her high school class (she scored a 1420 on her SAT), and enrolled at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Then, in fall 2003, Maura transferred to UMass Amherst because she decided she'd rather heal people than kill them, says her father, Fred Murray.

Maura had always shown athletic prowess too, and in high school her reputation as a star runner (she ran a five-minute mile) was known throughout Massachusetts.

But when Maura didn't win a race, which was rare, she'd get really quiet. Even though you could tell she was beating herself up inside for not winning, if you asked her whether she was upset, she'd shake her head no. Maura was like that: She kept things to herself and few people ever saw her cry.

That is, until a few days before she disappeared. Four days earlier, on Thursday, February 5, Maura had called her older sister Kathleen, 26, at around 10:20 P.M., during a quiet patch at Maura's second job manning a dorm security desk. "I was telling her all about this fight I'd had with my fiance'," says Kathleen. "Maura kept saying, 'Don't worry, he's a good guy. It'll work out." After they got off the phone, Maura was sitting at her desk doing her job. Then, according to police reports, she inexplicably burst into tears in front of a coworker-and wouldn't say why.

ANOTHER OUTBURST

Two days later, on Saturday, February 7, Maura's dad drove up to Amherst to help Maura buy a new car.

Maura and her father spent the day at car dealerships and then hit the Amherst Brewing Company for grilled chicken salads. At 10 P.M. her dad wanted to call it a night, so he had Maura drop him off at his motel, then drive herself to the dorm in his car.

About an hour later, Maura arrived at her friend Sara Alfieri's dorm room to hang out. For the next three hours, Maura, Sara, and a couple of friends sat around talking and listening to music while drinking Skyy Blue malt mixed with a little bit of wine. A couple of times, when there were pauses in the conversation, Maura mentioned that she wanted to return the car to her dad that night. "It didn't make any sense," says Kate Markopolous, who was there. Why would Maura, who'd had a few drinks and seemed tired, go to the trouble of driving all the way to her dad's motel in the middle of the night, when she didn't need to?

At 2:30 A.M., Maura left Sara's room, telling everyone she was going to go upstairs to her room. But instead, she got in her dad's car and started driving back to his motel. On the highway, the car jumped a sandy embankment and hit a guardrail. The front of the car's radiator crumpled, so Maura called AAA to tow the car. The police arrived and wrote up a report-but didn't give Maura a ticket.

When Maura told her father about the accident the next morning, he was upset. "The first thing I asked was, 'Are you all right?'" he says. As Fred Murray called garages, Maura sat there crying. "She kept repeating 'I'm sorry' over and over," he says. "I think she felt like she had really let me down." At 2 P.M., Murray dropped a still-teary Maura off at her dorm in a rental car. "I said, 'Maura, it will get fixed. Don't worry,'" he says. Then Maura got out, and her dad drove away.

DESPERATE SEARCH

The next day, on February 9, the New Hampshire police arrived at the scene of Maura's second accident-the one on Route 112. The police, fire department, and local residents searched area roads for her. They also left a message for the Murray family to let them know that there had been an accident. When Maura didn't turn up the next day, the police called again and told them she was missing.

Fred Murray drove up to New Hampshire and got a room at the Wells River Motel, near the accident site. As the police continued their search, Murray, along with the rest of his family and Maura's boyfriend, combed the area too. "I can't explain how it feels to be walking up an embankment, thigh-deep in snow, and then there's a big hill in front of you, and you have to walk up it because you see footprints in the snow and you might find your sister's body at the end," says Kathleen.

Two days after Maura's disappearance, dogs had tracked her scent to the road, about 100 yards away from the site. Her family thought that maybe someone had picked Maura up, so they printed up 15,000 flyers with her picture, and a crew of volunteers began tacking them to every signpost and gas station within 50 miles. But weeks went by, and no one came forward. So the Murrays are still searching for Maura.

QUESTIONS REMAIN

There is still no sign of Maura. "The only thing that makes sense is that a bad guy got her," says her dad.

But police disagree. "There is no evidence that she was abducted," says New Hampshire State Police Sergeant Thomas Yorke. Police have told newspapers that they suspect Maura intended to kill herself, but they've reached no conclusions. "As far as we're concerned, she's a missing person," says Yorke.

Maura's crying, along with her atypical drinking (her family and friends say she wasn't a drinker) and the two car accidents just before she disappeared, raises the question of whether she was buckling under some emotional pain. "I don't know what could have been going on that she didn't tell me about," says Bill. "As far as I knew, everything was fine."

"I may go to my grave never knowing where she's gone or even why she left school," says her father. "And as far as I can tell, no one else knows either."

Caption: Fred Murray printed "missing" flyers. They were posted as far away as Florida.

Caption: On February 9, 2004 year Maura crashed her car while driving along route 112.

Caption: Maura with her boyfriend Bill, in 2003.

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Newspaper Articles # 73
« Reply #73 on: December 12, 2019, 02:01:35 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

May 2, 2004

Missing: the story in NH

By Pat Hammond

There are scores of New Hampshire folks reported as missing right now. The ages and the reasons will vary, of course. And so will the outcomes.

The missing have received considerable attention in the wake of the disappearance -- and grim discovery -- of Amie Lynn Riley. The 20-year-old Manchester woman was found dead last week and her mother is trying to bring about changes when it comes to missing adults.

John Healy knows something about missing people. He owns and operates Litigation Intelligence Services, LLC, in Warner. A Certified Master Investigator, Healy retired from the New Hampshire state police at the rank of lieutenant.

"People go missing for a variety of reasons," Healy said. "Police involvement in these things is limited only due to the fact of the sheer volume of missing persons reported regularly. They just do not have the resources to fully investigate each case.

"Missing could mean a runaway teen, an adult who has disappeared, a kidnap victim, etc. There are lots of definitions and reasons. I think this is an area that is covered by a generic term and that is the problem," Healy said. "It is not a generic happening.

"People may be missing against their will, they may be lying low on purpose (such as deadbeat dads), or they may have just lost contact due to the passage of time," Healy said.

But sometimes the case is solved with the discovery of a corpse.

"I was recently asked to work on a missing person case on the Seacoast," Healy said. "I was going to peruse the bills and data left behind as well as the computer hard drive.

"The day I was headed over there," Healy said, "his body was found, close to his home, an accidental death."

The NCIC protocol

If Amie Lynn Riley's name had been entered into the FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database immediately after her mother reported her missing last August, that would not have altered the tragic ending of her short life, but her name would have been in a national database in the event that her body had been found in a place far away from New Hampshire.

Charlotte Riley of Chester is channeling her grief over her daughter's death into a mission to require police who process missing persons cases to enter the names into the nationwide database within a "reasonable period of time."

"I want a mandatory timeframe for entry of the names into the NCIC file," Mrs. Riley said yesterday. "It must be within a reasonable amount of time and, for me, that would be one week, not three months."

It was three months before the Manchester Police Department entered Amie's name into the NCIC. Amie's body was found a week ago -- eight months after her disappearance -- and her death has been pronounced a homicide.

Different for adults

"The general public feels that when someone goes missing you go to the police and report the person missing and can use NCIC, but that is only true if the person is a juvenile.

"If the missing person is an adult," Mrs. Riley said, "it is up to the person at the police department in coordination with the state police to decide if the person is really missing."

Federal law requires that missing persons meeting any of the following criteria must be entered into the NCIC system. The criteria cover any person of any age who is missing and:

has a physical or mental disability or is senile, subjecting himself or others to immediate danger

the disappearance was not voluntary

the person's physical safety may be in danger

the disappearance came after a catastrophe.

Erin Bruno is the case manager for the Nation's Missing Children Organization & Center for Missing Adults (NMCO), based in Phoenix. She has provided support to Charlotte Riley during the family's months-long ordeal.

99 in New Hampshire

"The most current statistics that we have are from 3/07/04 from the FBI's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database," Bruno told the Sunday News in an e-mail last week. "There were 46,315 active cases of missing persons over the age of 18 nationally and 99 active missing person cases of all ages in New Hampshire.

"The national number has been pretty stable over the past three months with a fluctuation of less than 300 people," Bruno said. "In February 2004 there were 12,510 cases of missing adults that were entered into the system and 13,827 cases that were canceled. The total canceled reflects newly entered cases and previously entered cases."

An FBI-NCIC source said that as of April 1 there were 45,980 active adult files. Of that, 24,443 are male, 21,534 female and there are three cases in which the gender is unknown.

Federal funding

A non-profit agency providing nationwide assistance to law enforcement and families of missing persons, NMCO was formed in 1994 to provide search and advocacy services to children. In 1995 it expanded its charter to include services to missing persons over the age of 18.

The U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Assistance granted the agency $1.57 million in 2002 to establish the first national clearinghouse for missing adults, providing services and advocacy to families of missing persons.

"Currently there is not a law that requires law enforcement to take a report on a missing adult, so there is no guarantee the (local) police department would be able to open a missing person investigation," Bruno said.

Two missing-person cases have stumped New Hampshire authorities in recent years: Tina and Bethany Sinclair of Chesterfield and Maura Murray of Hanson, Mass.

Tina Sinclair, then 34, and her daughter Bethany, 15, were last seen in February 2001 in the Chesterfield home of convicted sex offender Eugene Van Bowman, where they had been living.

Murray, a University of Massachusetts student, withdrew money from an ATM on Feb. 9, 2004, and e-mailed a professor that she wouldn't be in class all week because of a family problem. Around 7 p.m. she crashed her car into a snowbank on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., several miles from the Vermont border.

Police said a witness offered help but she refused and told the witness not to call police. Searches have proved unsuccessful.

It's not illegal

State police Sgt. Robert Estabrook is with the Major Crime Unit. "I get a list of missing persons periodically from NCIC," he said on Friday. "As of today, there are 56 missing (New Hampshire) people of all ages in our file. Our stats are probably more up-to-date than what NCIC has.

"It's not illegal for an adult to be missing," Estabrook said, "if they want to be. We are a clearinghouse for that. We send out a letter and a form after 30 days to the local police department to ask if the person is still missing. The police department checks off choices, such as 'the person has returned,' on a form and returns it to us."

"If the case is still active after 30 days," Estabrook said, "we would request dental records." Estabrook's office continues to communicate with the police department from time to time to make sure files reflect current information.

The 56 file cards include people missing from as long ago as 1978 but most disappeared within the last two years.

Asking questions

"Police officers are trained to ask specific questions with regard to a disappearance and are searching for indications that there might be foul play," Manchester Police Department spokesman Sgt. Mark Fowke said.

But some people choose to disappear, Fowke said. "As adults, we are free to come and go as we please. In an interview we ask if there is any reason why they should have run off. People do turn up."

Fowke scanned recent missing persons files on Friday and said, "There was one suicide but the majority of the ones I looked at were brought to a conclusion where we located an individual."

Outcomes unclear

Bruno, of the Nation's Missing Children Organization & Center for Missing Adults, said statistics on the outcomes of missing persons cases are "still a little ways off because we are still very young as the national clearinghouse and the numbers don't actually reflect the total population yet."

Charlotte Riley will be pursuing her crusade to change the NCIC rules on both the state and the national level.

"If it takes the loss of my daughter to do this," Riley said, referring to requiring police to enter the name of a missing person into the NCIC within a reasonable time period, "and me to be an advocate, then this is my mission in life.

"How can we fix it?" Mrs. Riley asks herself. "Is it going to be more work for the police? Yes, it's more paperwork, but we're not talking about pet seals, we are talking about real people."

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Newspaper Articles # 74
« Reply #74 on: December 12, 2019, 02:03:26 pm »
Boston Globe

May 3, 2004

Circle of Hope - Story in Caption

By Justine Hunt

Friends and family of Maura Murray gathered at the track at Whitman-Hanson High School yesterday to release balloons for Murray, who has been missing since Feb. 9 after a car accident. Globe Staff Photo / Justine Hunt

 

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