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Author Topic: Newspaper Articles  (Read 3038 times)

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 45
« Reply #45 on: December 10, 2019, 08:53:07 pm »
The Patriot Ledger

Wednesday, March 3, 2004

Leads fruitless, police stalled in Murray probe

By Joe McGee

Police investigating the disappearance of Hanson native Maura Murray have discovered that the disturbing phone conversation Murray had four days before leaving the University of Massachusetts at Amherst was with her sister.

According to her family, Murray called her sister, Kathleen Murray of Hanover, at about 10 p.m. Feb. 5, four days before she packed her belongings and headed north to New Hampshire. But what was said should not have upset the 21-year-old, Kathleen Murray said.

We didn't really talk about much. I had been fighting with my fiance', and we talked about that, but I don't know why she would be upset about that, Kathleen said.

Maura Murray's Saturn sedan crashed on Route 112 near Haverhill in northern New Hampshire at about 7 p.m. Feb. 9, hours after Murray left campus. She was gone when police arrived about 10 minutes later.

There were no footprints in the snow, and search dogs could not pick up her scent.

With the investigation well past the search-and-rescue phase, police are at a standstill trying to determine why Murray, a promising student and athlete, appears to have walked away from her college life.

A number of fresh leads have developed during the past three weeks, but none have proved fruitful, according to New Hampshire State Police Sgt. Bret Beausoleil. Nobody knows if Murray wandered into the woods and perished or if she was kidnapped.

The more time that goes by, the more concerned you get, but there is nothing we have found to point one way or the other, Beausoleil said.

Murray left UMass on the afternoon of Feb. 9. She cleaned out her dorm room as if she were leaving for good; did a MapQuest search for directions to Burlington, Vt.; took $280 in cash out of her bank account; and E-mailed her bosses and professors to say she would be away for personal reasons.

Kathleen Murray said she talked to her sister regularly to chat. Like all of their phone conversations, the one on Feb. 5 was about regular stuff, just-trying-to-get-through-the-day' kinds of things, she said.

When I heard she was crying after that, I couldn't understand why, especially because it's not like her to cry, she said.

Last week, Kathleen Murray and her brother Fred found a pair of women's underwear on a roadside in Haverhill. DNA testing had not been completed as of yesterday.

Sgt. Beausoleil said another tip, from a woman who was walking on Route 112 in Bath, N.H., on Feb. 9, also could not help investigators develop a criminal case.

The woman reported a suspicious man in a red pickup truck with Massachusetts plates eyeing her near the Stage Stop general store in Bath at about 7 that night.

According to the woman, the man left when she went into the store and headed east toward the accident scene. Ten minutes later, the woman saw Haverhill police go by in the same direction, responding to the accident.

She didn't have a license plate number, so that doesn't give us anything, Beausoleil said. We don't feel confident it's connected.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 46
« Reply #46 on: December 10, 2019, 08:55:29 pm »
The Boston Channel

March 4, 2004

Family, Friends Pray For Woman's Safe Return

Maura Murray Last Seen Feb. 9

DUXBURY, Mass. -- Family and friends of a missing Hanson woman say they will not give up the search for the college student.

University of Massachusetts student Maura Murray, 21, disappeared in New Hampshire nearly one month ago.

NewsCenter 5's Pam Cross reported that Murray's family, frustrated by police efforts to find her, say they plan to search on their own in northern New Hampshire.

In Duxbury Thursday, a small group of Murray's mother's friends held a Mass to pray for her safe return.

The simple service, led by a priest, was small, prayerful and emotional. Murray's mother and grandmother sat in front.

Murray was last seen Feb. 9. After she left her UMass dorm, she had a car accident in Haverhill, N.H. But before police arrived to help, she disappeared, leaving her car behind.

With no evidence of foul play, authorities say it's a missing person case, but her family disagrees.

"She was abducted. She would have called. She would have called. She didn't run away. She was abducted," said Murray's mother, Laurie.

A week ago, Murray's sister found women's underwear a few miles from where Murray's car was left. The underwear is being tested for DNA. This weekend, Murray's brother and sister will search again.

"I don't like them taking the investigation in their own hands, that scares me, too. Because my daughter was out walking in the woods by herself," said Laurie Murray of her other children.

Friends say there is little they can do, except offer support to the family.

"We have no idea. We are not giving up hope. We hope Maura is found and we are praying for her safe return," said family friend Maureen Walsh.

Murray's mother feels strongly that her daughter has not stayed away of her own free will. But with few clues to go on, she said she found comfort and hope in Thursday's service.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 47
« Reply #47 on: December 10, 2019, 08:57:51 pm »
The Patriot Ledger

Tuesday, March 9, 2004

Mysterious Miss: Closest friends say missing UMass student kept deepest feelings to herself

By Joe McGee

AMHERST - Kate Markopoulos considers herself one of Maura Murray's closest friends and yet knows she had a mysterious side.”I really didn't know (everything) about her, so now I don't find it so hard to believe'' Murray's disappearance from the University of Massachusetts, she said. She is struggling these days to figure out why Murray packed up her dormitory room a month ago today and took off for New Hampshire. Murray, a Hanson native, crashed on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., that Monday night and hasn't been seen or heard from since. Theories include that she is hiding out, was kidnapped, or wandered away disoriented and perished in the rugged, snowy woods. But what made her leave campus in the first place? She took care of stuff on her own. That's Maura,'' said Markopoulos, a senior history major from upstate New York who ran track with Murray for a year.

Murray, an excellent student and athlete at Whitman-Hanson Regional High School, enjoyed challenges like hiking in the White Mountains. When she scored 1420 of a possible 1600 on her SATs, everyone knew she was headed for big things. After graduating in 2000, she was accepted to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where her older sister was a cadet. She had excellent marks and was a great runner,'' her boyfriend, Army Lt. Bill Rausch, said. Rausch met Maura through Julie Murray, his classmate at West Point. She was a top student, in great shape and, of course, extremely beautiful,'' Rausch said.

For Murray, life appeared good at West Point. Things change at West Point. Then one day things changed. Military life wasn't for Maura, after all. Rausch said West Point does that to people. His class started with 1,200 and finished with 900. That's the great thing about West Point. It forces you to grow up quick and figure out exactly what you want,'' he said. To Murray's father, Fred Murray of Weymouth, it was a surprise but not a total shock that she wanted to pursue a nursing degree at UMass. He graduated from the school and Maura's mother, Laurie, is a nurse. The decision to leave West Point after her freshman year wasn't a rash one, Rausch said. The couple researched the transfer and it was a smooth transition. The couple figured that making new friends at UMass would be hard for Murray. After all, she would be entering her sophomore year and social cliques were already set. One day, UMass track coach Julie LaFreniere introduced Murray to her teammates. Markopoulos remembered it as the typical, awkward group introduction. At first, she noticed Murray was quiet and at times elusive.''

Planning marriage, starting career Their birthdays are 11 days apart. Their friendship blossomed last year when they turned 21. Then a new Murray came out - someone who could be somewhat flirtatious'' when she drank. All along, however, she was focused on settling down with Rausch and starting a career, said Markopoulos. She held two jobs so she could fly to Oklahoma, where Rausch is stationed at Fort Sill. She planned to move there after graduation. When Rausch visited Amherst during vacations, they'd do what many couples do on the weekends: hiking in the mountains, shopping for antiques and visiting book stores in Western Massachusetts. Basically, any time together was time well spent,'' Rausch said. Their life together was beginning to take shape. We really considered ourselves engaged. We actually were looking for rings over Christmas break,'' Rausch said.

On the afternoon of Feb. 9, Murray acted like she wanted to drop everything she worked hard for in life. She packed up her belongings in her room on the fourth floor of the John F. Kennedy residence hall, including wall decorations. She left messages for professors and bosses, lying about a death in the family. Then she loaded her Saturn sedan, a car that friends said she hadn't started in weeks, and took off. Her dorm mates didn't even notice she was gone. I didn't even know she lived here,'' said Kelli Martinson, a freshman from Hull who lived five doors down from Murray.

Can't figure out what went wrong. Even after four weeks, E-mails continue to go back and forth between friends from Hanson and friends at UMass, trying to figure out what went wrong. Nobody has been able to offer frustrated investigators much about their friend's background. Katie Jones, Murray's childhood friend and a student at Western New England College in Springfield, said although they've lived a few miles apart, they never visited each other at school. She was a very secretive person,'' Jones said. She never even told us about transferring to UMass until after it happened. Sometimes we think there might be more to that story than we know,'' she said.

Sophomore Sara Alfieri is just as puzzled. She and Murray met while working at art galleries on campus, drawn to each other because of their sarcastic attitudes and love of things ironic. Kept biggest problems to herself. She was so funny. She loved the web site The Onion. Her favorite movie is. Bottle Rocket,'' Alfieri said.

Despite being so close, Murray never talked about her friends at home, a group of seven girls at Whitman-Hanson who Jones said were inseparable. Murray kept even her biggest problems to herself. She didn't say a word to Alfieri about getting into an accident in her father's car the day before she left Amherst. The accident happened only an hour after they were hanging out in Alfieri's dorm.

Alfieri said Markopoulos, Murray and a few friends were drinking into the late-night hours of Feb. 8. Fred Murray was staying in a hotel on Route 9 that weekend. He was in town to help his daughter find a new car. Father and daughter ate dinner at the Amherst Brewing Co., a popular watering hole, that night. Then Markopoulos showed up for a drink. After about an hour, they left, the girls dropped Fred Murray at his hotel, and headed to Alfieri's dorm.

Everyone's left wondering. At about 1 a.m., Alfieri said she was passed out from drinking. Markopoulos was still up with Murray and they were talking about going home at about 2:30 a.m. But Murray wanted to go to her father's hotel, according to Markopoulos.

I told her just to go back to her room and meet him in the morning, but she wouldn't listen,'' she said. About an hour later, Murray cracked up her father's Toyota Corolla on Route 9. Alfieri found out the next week from news reports about her friend's disappearance. I thought that was so weird. I talked to her that day and she didn't even say anything,'' said Alfieri Now everybody is wondering about what they don't know about Maura Murray. If she can't figure it out after three years of friendship, Markopoulos said nobody might ever know.

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 48
« Reply #48 on: December 10, 2019, 09:00:13 pm »
The Caldedonian-Record

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

Missing Woman Investigation

Potential Evidence Discounted

By Gary E. Lindsley

Maura Murray's friends and relatives were breathing a bit easier Tuesday after learning underwear found off a road in the town of Haverhill did not belong to her.

Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, turned up missing the evening of Feb. 9 after she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill. The accident scene was about one mile east of Swiftwater.

"The DNA (tests) came back yesterday ... negative," Sharon Rausch said. "We are very glad. We are very hopeful." Rausch is the mother of Billie Rausch, Murray's fiance-to-be.

Murray's sister, Kathleen, found a white pair of underpants lying on top of the snow on a secluded trail off of French Pond Road Feb. 26.

Kathleen turned them over to the Haverhill Police Department who in turn handed it over to the New Hampshire State Police.

Maura's hair brush and a toothbrush were provided to the state police crime lab in Concord along with the underwear for testing.

Although it turns out the underwear did not belong to Murray, and that provides a glimmer of hope, Rausch said the family is also realistic. "None of us believe she is willfully in hiding," she said. "But we are hopeful."

Rausch said Murray has money in her bank account. However, that money has not been touched. Her credit cards have not been used. Nor has her cell phone since the accident at around 7 p.m. Feb. 9.

Rausch said she will never give up hope. She said she was praying on her way home from work Tuesday that something would help lead them to Murray.

She recalled the miraculous story of how Elizabeth Smart had been found and returned safely to her family in Salt Lake City, Utah, in March 2003 after being held captive by a couple since June 5, 2002.

"I lost my father when I was 9," Rausch said. "My mother died when I was 31. Both of those events were very hard. But nothing has been as hard as this."

Although Murray and her son had not yet married, Rausch, with her voice quivering, said Murray's disappearance is even more difficult because she is like a daughter to her.

Whenever Murray enters a room, she said, her big, dazzling smile just brightens it up.

According to Butch Atwood, a First Student school bus driver who lives about 100 yards from where Murray lost control of her 1996 black Saturn after rounding a sharp left-hand curve near The Weathered Barn on Route 112, Murray refused help from him when he stopped.

In a renewed effort to get the word out about Murray's disappearance and jog people's memories, Rausch said 15,000 8- by 10-inch color posters of the 21-year-old have been made up.

Bethlehem Fire Chief Jack Anderson, who is also the president of the Twin State Mutual Aid Fire Association, tentatively has agreed to have firefighters throughout the twin states help distribute about 1,000 of the posters. "We will try and help through our 26 towns," Anderson said. "It's a good cause. We have to find that girl." He said he feels for Murray's family and friends.

Rausch said she also has enlisted the help of Beth Drewniak of Hanson, Mass., to help distribute the posters. She said Drewniak's daughter grew up with Murray. "We are hoping $40,000 will (jog) someone's memory," she said.

The posters show a picture of Murray with her classic big smile and dimples. It says $40,000 will be paid for any information leading to her safe return.

She is 5 feet, 7 inches tall, weighs 115 pounds, has blue-green eyes and curly brown hair.

People with any information should call the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636. Anyone who may have see Murray can also call the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 49
« Reply #49 on: December 10, 2019, 09:02:35 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

March 26, 2004

Effort to find missing woman continues

HAVERHILL (AP) -- In a renewed effort to find a Massachusetts woman missing in northern New Hampshire, family and friends have begun distributing thousands of new posters and have announced a larger reward.

Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson, Mass., disappeared Feb. 9 after a minor accident in Haverhill.

Her family has printed 15,000 new posters carrying her photo and has announced the reward leading to her whereabouts has risen to $40,000.

Firefighters in 26 Vermont and New Hampshire communities in the Haverhill area are being enlisted to help distribute the posters.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles # 50
« Reply #50 on: December 10, 2019, 09:04:57 pm »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

March 28, 2004

Murray's father wants FBI to help

CONCORD (AP) -- The father of a missing University of Massachusetts nursing student has asked Gov. Craig Benson for help to get the FBI involved in the case.

Fred Murray of Weymouth, Mass., wants the governor to urge New Hampshire State Police to call in the FBI for help in finding Maura Murray.

She has been missing since the evening of Feb. 9 after a minor accident in which she failed to make a curve on Route 112 outside Haverhill.

"The finest resource in the world is available and you, sir, should direct" state police to seek FBI help, Murray said in his letter. "There are corollary cases in Vermont also and this entire situation begs for central coordination and investigation by an agency which is not bound by the confines of configuration of Grafton County and the Connecticut River."

Murray referred to Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., who disappeared after she left work late on March 19. Her car was found about one mile from the restaurant in Montgomery, Vt., where she worked.

Murray said the FBI offered its assistance during the week of his daughter's disappearance, but state police declined the offer.

State police Lt. John Scarinza has said state police have enough resources to conduct the investigation.

Benson's office released a statement that said he "has complete faith in the efforts of the New Hampshire State Police in the manner in which this case is being handled."

The office included a letter from state police Col. Frederick Booth that said investigators have contacted Massachusetts police, Vermont State Police, FBI and many surrounding county and local police agencies.

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Newspaper Articles # 51
« Reply #51 on: December 10, 2019, 09:07:19 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

March 29, 2004

Vermont Woman Turns Out Missing After Car Crash

By Gary E. Lindsley

Another young woman has turned up missing after a car accident on a dark, rural highway - this time in Vermont.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., has disappeared after being involved in a one-car accident late at night on the East Berkshire Road in northern Vermont.

This comes on the heels of the disappearance of Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has not been seen since she was involved in a one-car accident on a dark stretch of rural Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., Feb. 9.

Maitland was working at the Black Lantern in Montgomery March 19, when she clocked out at 11:20 p.m. and headed to her friend's house in Sheldon, where she was living. She had even left her friend a note saying what time she would be home from work.

She never made it.

Her car was found by police early the morning of March 20, with its rear end in an abandoned building. The car was about a mile from the Black Lantern, where Maitland is a dishwasher.

However, Maitland's parents were not notified about the accident although the car is registered to the mother, Kellie.

It wasn't until Tuesday, March 23, when Brianna's friends contacted the Maitlands, that they became aware something was wrong.

"They asked us if Brianna had moved back in with us," Bruce Maitland said. It was the first he and his wife had heard she was missing.

The Maitlands contacted state police in St. Albans to file a missing person's report. Troopers told them an all points bulletin would be put out about Brianna and her 1988 Oldsmobile.

State police did not draw any connection between Brianna and the car, until Thursday morning, nearly a week after the accident. The Maitlands were called about the Oldsmobile. Bruce Maitland said it was her car.

The Maitlands don't understand why state police did not call them after finding the car because the car is registered in Kellie's name.

"That was a huge error on their part," Bruce Maitland said. "I asked why we weren't notified. They said the telephone number did not match the address. All they would have had to do was look in the telephone book."

He said the state police have been very leery about sharing information with the family. "I gave them a good lead, the only one they have," he said. He did not want to publicly divulge what it was because he didn't want to compromise the investigation.

The Maitlands have also turned something else over to state police, a woman's jacket found near the accident scene. "It had a wallet with a woman's name and credit cards," Bruce Maitland said.

He said it appeared the woman was from California and had recently moved to Vermont. It also appeared she was a certified ski instructor.

With his daughter missing, as well as Murray, now finding this woman's jacket, Maitland is worried there may be someone in the area preying on young women.

Kellie Maitland is upset because state police have said they believe her daughter just took off.

She said a co-worker supposedly told troopers Brianna had said she was going to take off on a short trip.

Kellie Maitland does not believe that because she said her daughter was doing really well. She had recently passed her GED with flying colors, and worked at the Black Lantern and as a hostess at KJ's Diner in St. Albans.

"Her jobs are going well," Kellie Maitland said. "She has been upbeat. Everything seemed fine."

She also doesn't believe her daughter hit a patch of ice and slid off the road into the building. "I saw the pictures (of the accident scene)," Kellie Maitland said. "I know it was not her doing."

And she also does not believe Brianna just took off. "There weren't any keys in the car," she said. "And her two paychecks were on the front seat untouched."

Also, her ATM card, medication, makeup, clothes and contact lenses were still at her friend's house.

"She is very pretty," Kellie Maitland said. "I saw her earlier in the day (March 19). I had taken her shopping to get her dress slacks. She had a good time."

Brianna is 5 feet, 4 inches tall, weighs 105 pounds, has hazel eyes and medium length brown hair.

She also has a nose stud in her left nostril and a faint scar in her left eyebrow.

Kellie Maitland said her daughter, if she were planning a trip, would have come to her for money. She doesn't understand why state police are treating this as a young woman taking off.

"I don't want anyone else going through what Maura's family is going through," Kellie Maitland said.

State police in Vermont have not been available to talk about the Maitland investigation. Detective Sgt. Heidi Glynn was unavailable for comment Friday and Sunday.

When Sharon Rausch heard another young woman has turned up missing, under similar circumstances, and that state police are treating the case as a missing person rather than a criminal investigation, she was upset.

"It's like living it all over again," said Rausch, whose son, Billie, is Maura Murray's fiance-to-be. "I feel so sorry for her."

New Hampshire State Police had not heard about Maitland's disappearance in Vermont.

People with information about Maitland should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.

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Newspaper Articles # 52
« Reply #52 on: December 10, 2019, 09:09:41 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

March 31, 2004

VSP Forensics Team Studies Missing Teen's Car

By Gary E. Lindsley

A forensics team from the Vermont State Police lab in Waterbury began poring over a missing teenager's car Tuesday to obtain possible evidence, including whether foul play may have been involved in her disappearance.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, has been missing since she left the Black Lantern in Montgomery at 11:20 p.m. March 19. Her 1985 Oldsmobile sedan was found partially ensconced in an abandoned building off of East Berkshire Road, about a mile from the Black Lantern where she worked as a dishwasher.

Lt. Thomas Nelson, who is in charge of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation at the St. Albans barracks, said the forensics team began its investigation around 2 p.m. Tuesday.

Nelson said one of the things the team will be looking for is any sign of a struggle which may have occurred the night Maitland disappeared.

"The initial investigation did not show there was a violent struggle," he said. "We hope it's not a crime."

The Oldsmobile was discovered by a neighbor around 1:22 a.m. March 20, according to Nelson. The vehicle had sustained minor damage.

"It looked like it had been backed into the building," he said. "It did not look like a regular accident."

Kellie Maitland, Brianna's mother, also believes her daughter was not in an accident. She believes someone else was involved and forced the car into the building.

Maitland, and her husband, Bruce, are upset because they were never notified the car had been found, although Kellie is the registered owner.

The Maitlands were told by Brianna's friends March 23 she was missing and they filed a missing person report. State police did not mention anything about the car being found.

It wasn't until Thursday, nearly a week after Brianna's disappearance that investigators made a connection between the car and Brianna's disappearance, according to the Maitlands.

Nelson said he cannot say why the Maitlands were not notified March 20 when the car was found.

The reason could have been, according to Nelson, that the car was on private property and it didn't look like it had been involved in an accident.

"Oftentimes, people do leave their cars beside the road because maybe they had too much to drink," he said.

Also, it wasn't apparent to investigators Brianna had been the last person to drive the vehicle. However, the Maitlands said Brianna's paychecks were in the car.

Nelson said a couple of ground and air searches have been conducted of the area around the accident scene, although the area between the accident scene and the Black Lantern has not been searched. The searches have involved K-9 units and a helicopter from the Vermont National Guard.

"Troopers have done walks through the fields," Nelson said. "The search has been concentrated." So far, he said, nothing has turned up.

Regarding a woman's jacket which the Maitlands found in the area near the accident scene, Nelson said he does not believe there is any connection to Brianna's disappearance. However, he also said investigators haven't located the owner of the jacket yet.

When asked if investigators were looking at a possible connection between Brianna's disappearance in northern Vermont and the Feb. 9 disappearance of 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student Maura Murray, Nelson said they have not made any direct connection between the two cases.

"We never rule anything out," he said. "We will talk to (New Hampshire State Police)."

Murray, who is a resident of Hanson, Mass., disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after she had a car accident on a dark stretch of Route 112 in the town of Haverhill, N.H., about a mile east of the hamlet of Swiftwater.

Murray failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve past The Weathered Barn.

In another development, the Klaaskids Foundation, which was established in 1994 after Polly Klaas was abducted and murdered, has offered the Maitlands assistance searching for their daughter.

The foundation's search center director Brad Dennis has spoken with them about how he can assist them.

Dennis said the foundation also is working on contacting news groups nationally to help with finding Brianna.

Nelson said he would be more than willing to talk with people from the foundation's search center.

People with any information about Brianna, who is 5 feet, 4 inches tall, weighs 105 pounds, has hazel eyes and medium length brown hair, should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Brianna has a nose stud in her left nostril and a faint scar in her left eyebrow.

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Newspaper Articles # 53
« Reply #53 on: December 10, 2019, 09:12:03 pm »
The Caledonian Record

Friday, April 2, 2004

K-9 Teams To Search For Murray

By Gary E. Lindsley

HAVERHILL NEW HAMPSHIRE - Family and friends say they have not given up hope that 21-year-old Maura Murray, of Hanson, Mass., will be found.

Although an official air and ground search was declared concluded by New Hampshire Fish and Game and Troop F State Police officials in February, K-9 teams from the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association will resume their search of the Haverhill area this weekend.

Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Murray's fiance-to-be, said she, her son and Murray's family have not given up hope she will be found and safely returned.

However, Rausch said they also know a lot of time has elapsed since Murray's black 1996 Saturn was found off the road near The Weathered Barn along Route 112, about a mile east of the hamlet of Swiftwater, Feb. 9.

This weekend, like last weekend, K-9 teams from the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association will conduct a search of the area surrounding the accident site.

Rausch said one of the teams is Marilyn Greene, a team trainer and private investigator, and her K-9, Buddy, from Guilderland, N.Y.

Fred Murray, Maura's father, said he was impressed by the teams when they searched the area last weekend. He will be returning to the accident scene this weekend to search areas not being searched by the K-9 teams.

On another front, Rausch is enlisting the help of University of Massachusetts at Amherst officials. Maura was a junior nursing student there.

Rausch is asking them to send an e-mail message to the university's 40,000 students through a blind e-mailer between April 15 and 20.

The e-mail will read, "Please help us find Maura. Please forward this to all the contacts in your address book."

The e-mail will contain information about what Maura looks like as well as information about the accident which she was involved in the night of Feb. 9.

"It will literally (reach) hundreds of thousands of people," Rausch said.

She is holding off sending out the e-mail right now because about 15,000 posters are being distributed in Vermont and New Hampshire, as well as at UMass.

Rausch also wants to do something special for Maura's 22nd birthday May 4. Initially, she wanted to have balloons released.

However, she said the family and friends will ask people to tie blue ribbons around trees as well as to their car antennas.

The following message also will be released May 4: "Maura's family prays for her safe return on her birthday."

Maura is 5 feet, 7 inches tall, weighs 115 pounds, has blue-green eyes and curly brown hair.

She is soft-spoken and is an avid runner, logging between five and six miles daily.

People with any information should call the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636, or the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.

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Newspaper Articles # 54
« Reply #54 on: December 10, 2019, 09:14:25 pm »
Pittsfield Berkshire Eagle / Portsmouth Herald / Boston Globe / The New Hampshire Union Leader

April 4, 2004

Note: The Portsmouth Herald has additional paragraphs and some alternative wording in italics and the New Hampshire Union Leader has some additional words in italics as well.

More searches set for Mass. woman

Family still hoping to find missing woman

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) — Family and friends continued their search this weekend for a Massachusetts woman who disappeared after a car accident in northern New Hampshire in February.

"I'll never give up hope,” the missing woman’s mother, Laurie Murray, said through tears yesterday.

Although state officials ended their search weeks ago, K-9 dog teams from the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association resumed searching the Haverhill area for any sign of Maura Murray, 21, of Hanson. Mass.

Police have said there is no evidence of foul play and are treating the disappearance as a missing person investigation.* Numerous searches, using dogs and helicopter, turned up no sign that Murray wandered into the snow-covered woods and led police to sat Murray may have wanted to get away on her own for a while.*

Searchers found no signs of struggle at the scene, and it appears Murray was planning a getaway. She lied to professors about a death in the family, and said she would be gone from class for the week. Then she packed her belongings as if she was moving out. Police said Murray may have wanted to get away for a while.

Her mother said she doesn’t buy it.

From her home in Hanson, Mrs. Murray said she doesn't buy it.

“Two months, and there have been no clues, nothing. Isn't that odd." she said. Laurie Murray, whose daughter attended the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, said she planned to travel to the Haverhill area today to deliver a message to police.

The distraught mother/Mrs. Murray said she planned to travel to the Haverhill area on Sunday to deliver a message to police.

Mrs. Murray said she also wants to help distribute new fliers announcing that the reward for information leading to Maura Murray has risen to $40,000 Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Murray's boyfriend, said she her son and Murray’s family have not given up hope she will be found and safely returned.

“She's not a runaway,” she said. “ She was abducted. She would never not call her family."

Fred Murray, the missing woman’s father, said he was impressed by the teams when they searched the area last weekend. He was returning to the scene this weekend to search areas not being searched by the K 9 teams.

Meanwhile, Rausch is enlisting the help of University of Massachusetts at Amherst officials. Murray was a junior nursing student there Rausch is asking them to send an e mail message to students this month reading: “Please help us find Maura. Please forward this to all the contacts in your address book." The email will contain a description of Murray and information about the accident on the night of Feb. 9. "It will literally (reach) hundreds of thousands of people," Rausch said.

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Newspaper Articles # 55
« Reply #55 on: December 10, 2019, 09:16:47 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 8, 2004

America's Most Wanted Producers Decline To Profile Missing Woman Case Seventeen Magazine To Publish Story

By Gary E. Lindsley

The television show "America's Most Wanted" will not profile the case of a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student who disappeared the night of Feb. 9 after she was involved in a one-car crash on Route 112 in Haverhill.

Maura Murray, a resident of Hanson, Mass., and a junior at the UMass Amherst campus, was driving a black 1996 Saturn at about 7 p.m. when she failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve and went off the right side of Route 112 after driving past The Weathered Barn.

Jeremy Cohen, managing editor for "America's Most Wanted," says Murray's case will not be profiled on the Fox network's TV show.

"I know about the case," Cohen said. "I have been aware of it since it happened. Unfortunately, we can't do many missing cases at all."

He says the show devotes most of its missing people air time to cases involving children.

"As for adults," Cohen said, "we only do it when there is clear evidence of a crime."

Unless it's clear to the show's producers a crime has been committed, a case won't be aired.

"It's been our experience when we can't tell our viewers what to look for, we don't get a response," he said. "We save our space on our show (for a case) only if it would be successful. Unfortunately, we turn down a lot of cases."

While "America's Most Wanted" officials are refusing to profile Murray's case, Seventeen, a magazine geared toward 12- to 24-year-old girls and young women, is very interested.

Members of the magazine's staff have been interviewing Murray's friends and family members. Elizabeth Dye, a spokeswoman for Seventeen, said there isn't a run date yet for the story, though she feels it should resonate among the magazine's subscribers.

"We feel like other young women can learn from circumstances from everyday situations," Dye said. "We also believe there is a community of readers out there who may be able to help."

She said Seventeen's readers will be able to identify with Murray.

Dye said Seventeen's circulation is 2.1 million readers, but she estimates the magazine actually reaches about 14 million people through its presence in doctors' offices, libraries and other venues.

Fred Murray, Maura's father, has been searching the area where his daughter had her accident every weekend since he was notified. He was not happy with the decision of "America's Most Wanted."

"I am really disappointed," Murray said. "It has an extensive audience and is so influential."

Lt. John Scarinza of New Hampshire State Police Troop F and Haverhill Police Chief Jeffery Williams both have said they, too, would welcome the TV show profiling the case.

If the show did profile Maura's disappearance, he said, maybe someone somewhere in the country, who may have been traveling through the Haverhill, N.H., area the night of Feb. 9, may recall seeing something. Or they may remember having seen her get on a bus somewhere.

"It's just the national scope of it," he said. "Plus, it would put pressure on the state police to call in the FBI. You have two close to one another, geographically and chronologically."

Murray was referring to not only his own daughter, but also to Brianna Maitland, 17, who has been missing since leaving work late the night of March 19. Maitland's car was found with its rear end in an abandoned building about a mile from the Black Lantern in Montgomery, Vt., during the early-morning hours of March 20. She hasn't been seen since.

Murray, though, is happy Seventeen magazine will be profiling his daughter.

"I will take any help I possibly can get," he said. "Everything helps."

Sharon Rausch, whose son, Billy, is Maura's boyfriend, is also glad Seventeen is interested.

"I am thrilled," Rausch said. "This has been in the works for awhile."

She said the magazine had sent an e-mail to Maura Murray's Web site, www.spbowers.com/mauramissing.html, leaving a message they were interested in publishing a piece.

Maura is 5 feet, 7 inches tall, weighs 115 pounds, and has blue-green eyes and curly brown hair. Anyone with information should call the New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636, or the Haverhill Police Department at 603-787-2222.

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Newspaper Articles # 56
« Reply #56 on: December 10, 2019, 09:19:09 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 9, 2004

Vermont, N.H. State Police Rule Out Connection Between Disappearances - Search Resumes For Vermont Teen

By Gary E. Lindsley

Vermont and New Hampshire state police say there isn't a connection between the disappearances of two young women within the past couple of months.

They say both disappeared after their vehicles were involved in motor vehicle accidents, but that is the extent of the similarity.

Maura Murray, a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student from Hanson, Mass., has been missing since she was involved in a one-car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., the night of Feb. 9.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., has been missing since she left work at the Black Lantern in Montgomery the night of March 19. Her car was found the next morning with its rear end partially inside an abandoned building about a mile from the Black Lantern on the East Berkshire Road.

"We have been in contact with Vermont State Police several times," said Lt. John Scarinza of New Hampshire State Police Troop F.

He said there aren't any similarities other than Murray and Maitland disappeared after accidents.

Lt. Thomas Nelson of the Vermont State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation at the St. Albans barracks, also said there isn't a connection.

Bruce Maitland, Brianna's father, said the family and friends will be conducting another search for her this weekend.

Maitland said a command center will be set up at the East Franklin Store. A search will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday. The phone number at the store is 802-933-4100.

The family received help with a major search last weekend from Brad Dennis of the Klaaskids Foundation Search Center. The foundation was established in 1994 after Polly Klaas was abducted and murdered.

Maitland said the experience was invaluable and will help the family conduct another search this weekend.

During the search last weekend, duct tape and clothing were found and turned over to state police. However, Nelson says none of it was connected to Brianna's disappearance.

Maitland said a lot of tips have been received. He praised VSP for doing a good job, although he believes they made mistakes in the beginning.

On the other hand, Fred Murray, Maura's father, is upset with the response of New Hampshire State Police in its investigation into his daughter's disappearance and what he says is law enforcement's reluctance to get the FBI fully involved.

Murray is going to be speaking with Scarinza today to appeal to him to bring the FBI in. He also is asking for the public's help.

"I am appealing to the public," he said "I want people to walk their fence lines and their property. Get help if you need it."

"She could have ducked up a driveway and around a house," Murray went on to say. "And I am not just appealing to people in New Hampshire. I am also appealing to people in Vermont, especially since a young girl in Vermont is missing."

When members of Maura's family searched her 1996 black Saturn after her disappearance, they found information indicating Maura may have intended on going to the Stowe and Burlington areas in Vermont.

People with information about Maitland should call Vermont State Police at 802-524-5993.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.

Whitman-Hanson Express

July 12, 2007

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Newspaper Articles # 57
« Reply #57 on: December 10, 2019, 09:21:32 pm »
The Caledonian-Record

April 10, 2004

Murray's Family Enlists Help From Psychic Profiler

By Gary E. Lindsley

Maura Murray's family has enlisted the help of a nationally known psychic profiler to help them find her.

Murray, a 21-year-old University of Massachusetts at Amherst nursing student from Hanson, Mass., has not been seen since she was involved in a one-car accident in Haverhill, N.H. Feb. 9.

Carla Baron of Los Angeles, Calif., has come up with a theory about what happened to Murray the night her car failed to negotiate a sharp left-hand curve after driving by The Weathered Barn.

Baron, along with Maura's father, Fred, want to reserve some of the information so New Hampshire State Police can have a chance to act on it.

She believes Maura was picked up by someone passing through the area where the accident occurred.

"I believe she is no longer with us," Baron said.

She has told Maura's father she believes Maura met with foul play.

Baron, a psychic profiler who helped lead police to finding the body of a man who had committed suicide in a cornfield in the Midwest, has provided Fred Murray with a description of the person who picked her up as well as the type of vehicle.

She has also told him in what kind of an area Maura can be found.

"I have been in touch with Maura," Baron said.

Maura met with foul play the same night as the accident, she said.

What really concerns Murray, is what else Baron has told her. She has told him there is another woman who can be found near Maura who has fallen victim to the same person. And, Baron also told him there have been others.

Murray does not want too many details released right away to the public until the state police have had time to analyze the information and search possible locations.

Baron has been able to obtain somewhat of a description about the man as well as where she can possibly be found by talking twice with Maura's father via the telephone for a total of about 21/2 hours.

"It's called remote viewing," she said, referring to how she obtained the information about what happened to Maura by talking to her father.

Murray said he spoke with Lt. John Scarinza and others from New Hampshire State Police Troop F Friday.

"I gave them my theory that someone picked her up," he said.

He asked them, again, to bring in the FBI and make a direct appeal to the public for any information they may have in helping find his daughter.

"I asked him if he would accept help from a nationally known psychic," Murray said.

He said Scarinza mentioned they had been contacted by other psychics.

"They said they would accept help from a psychic," he said.

Murray is hoping state police and Baron talk soon.

Baron has appeared in episodes of "Psychic Detectives" on Court TV and will be seen in a segment of ABC's "Primetime" at 10 p.m. Thursday.

Anyone with information about Murray should contact New Hampshire State Police at 603-271-3636.

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Newspaper Articles # 58
« Reply #58 on: December 10, 2019, 09:23:54 pm »
Boston Globe

April 11, 2004

Missing student's kin skeptical of psychic

By Peter DeMarco

Maura Murray's parents have reacted with skepticism to a nationally known psychic profiler who believes the missing college student was abducted and murdered after vanishing from a rural New Hampshire road on Feb. 9.

"I don't believe her," said Laurie Murray, of Hanson, whose daughter disappeared without a trace after crashing her car into a snowbank in Woodsville, N.H. "I don't believe in [psychics] at all."

Murray's father, Fred Murray, of Weymouth, said he was not sure whether to believe California profiler Carla Baron, who said she has had psychic visions of his daughter's abduction and death.

But with law enforcement officials at a loss to explain his 21-year-old daughter's disappearance, Fred Murray said he is willing to listen to anyone offering help.

"About five or six psychics have contacted me. I have no idea whether they know what they're talking about or not," he said. "If they're wrong, they're wrong. It's worth a try, [as] the police seem to be out of ideas and there's no information coming forward."

Murray, who believes his daughter was abducted, said he contacted Baron a few weeks ago after being told of her strong track record with missing persons cases. The California psychic said she has helped dozens of police departments with homicide and missing persons cases over the past 20 years.

Baron said yesterday that after speaking with Fred Murray on the phone, she saw visions of Maura Murray and received messages from her in the form of thoughts.

Baron said she believes Murray hitched a ride with "a clean-cut looking man" in a truck following her car accident the night of Feb. 9. The man then sexually assaulted her and buried her body in a sparsely wooded area that may be a construction site, Baron said.

Her assailant, Baron added, has killed at least one other woman whose body is buried close to Murray's. "He happened to be driving by her. It was an opportunity. That's the thrill for him -- he never knows where the thrill will be," Baron said.

Baron equated her visions to snippets of a movie film, in which she perceives some details but not others. She could not say where Murray was picked up by her assailant, or whether Murray had hitched previous rides.

The psychic said she also was not sure why Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and former college track star, abruptly packed her belongings the day she disappeared and drove to New Hampshire without telling any friends or family members of her plans.

Fred Murray said he met with New Hampshire State Police on Friday to inform them about Baron's psychic reading. At his urging, Baron said, she left her contact information with investigators.

Baron, who was featured with psychic John Edwards on the 2003 Court TV program "Psychic Detectives," and has made several television and radio appearances, acknowledged that her readings are often met with skepticism.

While in some instances she has led invesigators directly to victims, she said, on other occasions her input is merely a starting point for an investigation.

"Hopefully we can start talking," she said. "Even if there is one little piece of information I have that can assist them in finding where she is, it's [worth it]."

New Hampshire State Police have said they have yet to find evidence of foul play in Murray's disappearance. The lead investigator on the case, John Scarinza, could not be reached yesterday.

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Newspaper Articles # 59
« Reply #59 on: December 10, 2019, 09:26:16 pm »
Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise / The New Hampshire Union Leader / Nashua Telegraph / Portsmouth Herald / Lowell Sun

Sunday, April 11, 2004

Note: The Lowell Sun includes additional detail, in bold at the bottom.

Missing UMass student’s family turns to psychic

HAVERHILL, N.H. (AP) — The family of a Massachusetts woman missing in northern New Hampshire for two months turned to a psychic to try to get some answers — and they didn’t get good news.

The psychic said she believes the young woman is dead, the victim of a serial killer.

University of Massachusetts nursing student Maura Murray has not been seen since she was involved in a one-car accident in Haverhill on Feb. 9.

Police have said there are no signs of foul play, but her family, and now nationally known psychic Carla Baron say they believe someone picked Murray up after the accident and harmed her.

Baron, of Los Angeles, believes Murray was picked up by a man passing through the area.

“I believe she is no longer with us,” Baron said.

Baron, a psychic profiler who helped lead police to finding the body of a man who had committed suicide in a cornfield in the Midwest, has provided Murray’s father, Fred, with a description of the person she believes picked up the woman, as well as the type of vehicle.

Fred Murray said Baron also told him there is another woman’s body near his daughter’s — a victim of the same person. And, Baron told him there have been others.

Murray told the Caledonia Record he does not want too many details released right away so police have time to analyze the information and search possible locations.

He said he spoke with Lt. John Scarinza, who has been in charge of the case, on Friday.

He asked police, again, to bring in the FBI and make a direct appeal to the public for any information they may have in helping find his daughter.

He said Scarinza mentioned police had been contacted by other psychics.

Meanwhile, Vermont and New Hampshire state police say there is no connection between the disappearances of Murray and a young woman over the border in Vermont.

Both disappeared after the next being involved in traffic accidents, but police say that is with its rear where the similarities end.

Brianna Maitland, 17, of Sheldon, Vt., has been missing since she left work in Montgomery, Vt., the night of March 19. Her car was found the nest morning with its rear end partially inside an abandoned building about a mile away.

 

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