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Author Topic: Newspaper Articles  (Read 2447 times)

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles #162
« Reply #165 on: December 15, 2019, 08:29:25 am »
The Caledonian-Record

December 29, 2005

Father Sues State, Police Over Missing Daughter

By Gary E. Lindsley

New Hampshire state and law enforcement officials are facing a lawsuit filed against them by the father of a missing 21-year-old Massachusetts woman.

Maura Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, was last seen after her car crashed on a sharp left curve near the Weathered Barn on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H., Feb. 9, 2004. She disappeared before police arrived.

Murray left her Amherst dorm room the morning of Feb. 9 and headed north into New Hampshire. She was traveling along Route 112 in Haverhill when her car crashed.

A passing school bus driver saw and spoke with her. Between the time he spoke with her and left, and Haverhill Police arrived, a span of 10 minutes, she disappeared.

Her father has been seeking police records regarding the accident scene and her disappearance for nearly two years.

He has sought the information under the New Hampshire Right-To-Know Law as well as the federal Freedom of Information Act.

Murray has filed a lawsuit in Grafton Superior Court.

According to The Associated Press, Murray has been highly critical of police and met with Gov. John Lynch earlier this year to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation. He's now sued Lynch, Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, state police and other law-enforcement agencies seeking the release of information tied to the investigation, such as accident reports; an inventory of items taken from her car; a copy of his daughter's computer hard drive; and a surveillance tape from a liquor store where she made a purchase.

"I actually do hope to get the records," Murray said. "It is a missing person's case, not a criminal investigation, according to police. I need the records because I am still actually searching for her."

He is seeking injunctive relief stemming from an improper denial of records by an agency or official covered by the Right-To-Know Law, according to the lawsuit. He is not seeking anything but the information about his daughter's accident and disappearance.

Murray said he has been told by police and the state attorney general's office that information cannot be released because there is an ongoing investigation.

[Attorney General] Ayotte told The Associated Press Wednesday that she had not seen the lawsuit, which was filed last week, but that "we have shared whatever information we feel we can share without jeopardizing the investigation." She said that Maura Murray is still being treated as a missing person, but "it was a suspicious disappearance. We've treated the case very seriously."

"... The case continues to be pursued vigorously. Mr. Murray's had frequent contact with both my office and members of the state police. In fact, I personally met with him along with lead investigators of the state police last spring and he was assigned a victim's witness advocate from my office," who has been in contact with him regularly, Ayotte told The Associated Press.

Jeffery Strelzin, a New Hampshire senior assistant attorney general, would not comment about the lawsuit.

"I cannot comment on it because it is pending litigation," said Sheriff Doug Dutile, of the Grafton County Sheriff's Department, also named in the suit.

Murray's lawsuit seeks to determine whether the state agencies have violated the state information law.

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has determined that the Right-To-Know Law applies to all state executive branch agencies and departments, according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit maintains that public records, including investigative reports produced by law enforcement, must be produced unless they fall under on one of the statutory exemptions of the law.

The exemptions include: disclosure interferes with enforcement proceedings; deprives a person of a right to a fair trial or an impartial adjudication; constitutes an unwarranted invasion of privacy; or discloses investigative techniques and procedures.

The lawsuit alleges that state officials have denied requests for information because the case is an ongoing investigation, or would constitute an invasion of privacy.

Murray claims because state police have from the beginning classified the case as being a missing person's investigation, not a criminal investigation, the information under New Hampshire law must be provided.

A hearing on Murray's request has been scheduled on Jan. 18 at Grafton County Superior Court.

"We need to narrow things down and go in a fruitful direction," Murray said. "Do I expect to get [the information]? I don't know. I hope they don't have any influence over the court."

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles #163
« Reply #166 on: December 15, 2019, 08:29:56 am »
Nashua Telegraph / Portsmouth Herald / Boston Globe

December 29, 2005

Note: Variations in the Portsmouth Herald are in Italics

Father sues state, police over probe

Man wants data released in daughter's disappearance

Father sues for records

Maura Murray disappeared in ’04 from Granite State

Father of Missing Woman Sues N.H. for Records of Case

HAVERHILL (AP) - From the moment his daughter disappeared Feb. 9, 2004, Fred Murray believed she was a victim of foul play.

Maura Murray, a 21-year-old nursing student at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, vanished that night after a minor car accident on Route 112 in Haverhill. Police searched the area repeatedly, but said they have no evidence of foul play.

Murray has been highly critical of police and met with Gov. John Lynch earlier this year to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation. Fred Murray, however, has been highly critical of police, and he met with Governor John Lynch earlier this year to ask for his help in getting records of the investigation.

He’s now sued Lynch, Attorney General Kelly Ayotte, state police and other law-enforcement agencies seeking the release of information tied to the investigation, such as accident reports; an inventory of items taken from her car; a copy of his daughter’s computer hard drive; and a surveillance tape from a liquor store where she made a purchase.

A hearing on Murray’s request has been scheduled on Jan. 18 at Grafton County Superior Court.

Ayotte said Wednesday she had not seen the lawsuit, which was filed last week, but that “we have shared whatever information we feel we can share without jeopardizing the investigation.”

A hearing on Murray's request has been scheduled for Jan. 18 at Grafton County Superior Court.

She said that Maura Murray's case is still that of a missing person, but that "it was a suspicious disappearance."

"We've treated the case very seriously," Ayotte said.

But Fred Murray contends he hasn't been made aware of "any specific efforts the governmental authorities have taken in pursuing this matter within the past several months." Murray also questions whether the investigation into his daughter’s disappearance is ongoing, saying he hasn’t been made aware of

"The most compelling reason favoring disclosure in this case centers on the fact that Maura could very well still be in danger, and disclosure of the information compiled by authorities could help locate her," the lawsuit says. according to the suit.

She said that Maura Murray is still being treated as a missing person, but “it was a suspicious disappearance. We’ve treated the case very seriously,” she said.

According to the lawsuit, Fred Murray was denied the records “on the grounds that production called for confidential records created . . . or would constitute an invasion of privacy.”

“Although (investigators) have continued to dispute the notion, Fred Murray’s familiarity with his daughter leads him to believe that it is likely that Maura Murray was the victim of foul play and may even still be in danger, rather than she went missing of her own accord.”

Ayotte said between state police, the Fish and Game Department, other law-enforcement agencies and her own office, thousands of hours have been spent on the investigation.

“The case continues to be pursued vigorously,” she said. “Mr. Murray’s had frequent contact with both my office and members of the state police. In fact, I personally met with him along with lead investigators of the state police last spring and he was assigned a victim’s witness advocate from my office,” who has been in contact with him regularly, she said. Police also have said that they talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear.

Maura Murray’s case will be featured on the ABC news magazine “20/20” next month. The case will be featured on the ABC newsmagazine "20/20" next month.

Police have said that they talk with Murray on a regular basis when new leads appear.

A $40,000 reward is being offered for "any information leading to Maura's safe return," according to a Web site being maintained for her at http://www.mauramurray.com. A $40,000 reward is offered for information leading to the woman's safe return, according to www.mauramurray.com.

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Newspaper Articles #164
« Reply #167 on: December 15, 2019, 08:30:25 am »
The Boston Channel

(INCOMPLETE?)

January 4, 2006

Private Investigators Renew Search For Missing Woman 21-Year-Old Disappears After Car Accident In New Hampshire

BOSTON -- A group of private investigators agreed Wednesday to join the search for a missing Massachusetts woman who disappeared last year after a car accident in New Hampshire.

NewsCenter 5's Amalia Barreda reported that Maura Murray disappeared in February 2004 after walking away from an accident that she had in Haverhill, N.H. The mystery of what happened to the 21-year-old University of Massachusetts nursing student still lingers.

"It's a real mystery. A young lady, seemingly with everything going for her, just vanishes off the face of the Earth," private investigator Thomas Shamshak said.

Shamshak said that Murray's family has reached out to the Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts, and the group decided to respond for free.

"They're in the throes of a crisis. I could not imagine something like that happening to me. When I look into these peoples' eyes they want some closure, they need some help. That's what we're offering. That's all we can offer is some hope and bring some peace to this crisis," he said.

Murray's father, Fred, has battled with New Hampshire authorities. He said officials have not done enough to find his daughter. The Murray family is suing the state for access to evidence gathered during the investigation.

Shamshak said that he does not expect that dispute to get in the way of his investigation. He said that his group, which is made up of retired law enforcement officials, hopes to bring a fresh set of eyes to the case.

"The investigative firepower that we're bringing to this is considerable. I mean, we're talking about a small department up there that had to rely on state police, and they could only go so far. It's a missing persons case," he said.

Shamshak said that 12 retired law enforcement professionals from throughout New England have already had a strategy meeting. He said that they would stay with the Murray case as long as it takes to solve it.

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Newspaper Articles #165
« Reply #168 on: December 15, 2019, 08:30:50 am »
Boston Herald

January 4, 2006

Page 4

PIs working for free to find UMass Student

By Jessica Fargen

A team of a dozen private investigators is taking a fresh look at the case of missing college student Maura Murray after her family charged that New Hampshire authorities didn't do enough to find the woman they last saw two years ago.

"We still don't know where Maura is or what happened to Maura," said Helena Murray of Weymouth, whose husband is Murray's second cousin.

The family has exhausted searches of the wooded area where Murray disappeared. They hired a psychic profiler and are suing the state of New Hampshire for access to evidence such as videotapes and accident reports.

"We'll have more eyes, more hands, more ears and we quite frankly don't know a lot about what the police did," Helena Murray said.

Once known for promoting child ID kits and parental awareness, the Molly Bish Foundation has reached out in the past year to the Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts.

Together, they persuaded private detectives to work for free on three other cold cases involving murdered or kidnapped young women dating back to 1984.

Murray, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, disappeared the night of Feb. 9, 2004, after she crashed her car into a tree in Haverhill, N.H.

"It's a real mystery," said Thomas Shamshak, who is part of the investigative team.

"Maura vanished. Could Maura be alive? Yeah, I think the family would hope that she went someplace else and may be living. But there's also the possibility she's not alive."

Helena Murray is hoping for some good news.

"We hope they can just look at things differently than we have," she said. "They can take all the information we do have - we don't have a whole lot - and see if they can come up with any answers."

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Newspaper Articles #166
« Reply #169 on: December 15, 2019, 08:31:14 am »
The Republican

Thursday, January 5, 2006

Missing student search revived

By Holly Angelo

Northampton - A dozen private detectives from four states have teamed up with the Molly Bish Foundation in an attempt to help solve the case of Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts-Amherst nursing student who disappeared nearly two years ago in Haverhill, N.H.

About a year ago, the Molly Bish Foundation and the Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts Inc. partnered to offer free investigative services to families dealing with unsolved crimes. The Murray family, who live in various places in Massachusetts, is the latest to be helped.

"We'll be developing an investigative plan," Thomas P. Shamshak, an investigator with Licensed Private Detectives Association of Massachusetts and the public safety consultant for the Molly Bish Foundation, said yesterday. "We're going to reinterview everybody."

Shamshak said that means going back to the UMass-Amherst campus, where Murray, 21, of Hanson, was a junior nursing student. Before she disappeared on Feb. 9, 2004, she packed up her dorm room and e-mailed her professors to tell them she was going home for the week because of a death in the family, but there was no death in the family.

She disappeared on Route 112 in Haverhill after crashing her car into a tree. A witness told police Murray was unharmed after the accident, but when police arrived on the scene minutes later she was gone. Her car was undrivable.

"It really is a mystery. This young lady is seen, and in a matter of minutes she vanishes from the roadway," Shamshak said. "It's right up there with the Molly Bish case."

The foundation is named after Molly Bish, who disappeared from her lifeguard post in Warren in June 2000. Her remains were found in Palmer three years later, and her death remains unsolved.

The Murray family has been critical of the police investigation. Last week, Fred J. Murray, Maura's father, sued several state offices and law enforcement agencies in New Hampshire seeking the release of police reports and other information and items tied to his daughter's case. The family could not be reached for comment yesterday.

Lt. John K. Scarinza, commander of State Police Troop F in Twin Mountain, N.H., said several detectives continue to investigate Murray's disappearance daily. The investigation is technically titled a missing person case, but has been investigated like a criminal case.

"Certainly if anyone, whether it be a private citizen or anyone else, develops legitimate information that will help find Maura Murray, I welcome that," Scarinza said yesterday. "I think it's important people realize she left school voluntarily. She had a destination in mind. What we don't know was what that destination was."

Scarinza added, "It is also crystal clear the family's initial impression was she was in distress and was maybe considering suicide.

"May she be a victim of a crime? That's absolutely possible," he said.

Shamshak, who is the former police chief in Spencer, said he has spoken to Murray's friends, family, acquaintances and boyfriend. He said detectives from Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine will use all public records associated with the case. He said the New Hampshire state police have done a "considerable amount of work" on the case, but the volunteer detectives have the time to re-examine leads.

"When things go cold, that's where we step in," Shamshak said. "Anything that is generated from us will certainly be passed along to law enforcement."

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles #167
« Reply #170 on: December 15, 2019, 08:31:48 am »
The Patriot Ledger

January 5, 2006

New eyes look for missing woman: 12 volunteers could act as ‘catalyst’ in search for student from Hanson

By Joe McGee

A team of private investigators is joining forces with the family of Maura Murray to help find the missing 22-year-old Hanson woman.

John Healy, a retired New Hampshire State Police trooper, is leading the 12-man group of volunteers. They are already focusing on a few leads police might not have looked into, Healy said yesterday.

‘‘There are a couple of remote parking areas and fishing areas two to three miles from the highway and those areas may not have been searched yet,’’ Healy said.

Murray disappeared on Feb. 9, 2004, after her car was involved in a minor single-vehicle accident on Route 112 in Haverhill, N.H.

Nearly two years later, the effort to find her has been re-energized, not only by the volunteer group but by national media attention and a recently filed legal petition.

The Murray case will be featured on the ABC-TV news program ‘‘20/20’’ next month. The segment will be titled ‘‘Vanished.’’

Murray’s family has been at odds with New Hampshire authorities. The family says police have not done enough to keep them informed about the investigation.

Murray’s father, Fred Murray, has filed a court petition seeking access to police records.

On the one-year anniversary of Murray’s disappearance, he hand-delivered a request for documents to New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch. It was rejected.

‘‘Essentially, he (Murray) has asked for the investigative file,’’ said Jeff Strelzin, New Hampshire’s senior assistant attorney general.

Strelzin said New Hampshire authorities consider the information confidential.

‘‘We’re going to oppose that request,’’ he said. ‘‘We’ll lay out our argument in court that essentially this is a confidential file and not something that should be released.’’

Healy said his team includes retired state troopers, two former police chiefs, a former federal agent and sportsmen familiar with the White Mountains region.

Healy was put touch with the Murray’s through the Molly Bish Foundation and the Licensed Private Investigators Association of Massachusetts, an industry group that has been working on the case of missing Brockton woman Jennifer Fay.

The association’s executive director said the New Hampshire team will add a new set of eyes to the search and act as liaison between the Murray’s and police.

"They can pave the road because they’ve worked both sides of a case ... so they can act as a catalyst," White said.

Healy said Strelzin was informed that the private search team is working the case with the goal of assisting authorities.

The Fay case will provide a blueprint for the investigation, he said.

‘‘We’ll have dogs as well as ground-penetrating radar available,’’ he said.

Healy said he has worked on several missing-person cases in remote parts of New Hampshire. He said there is a long history of people getting lost in the densely wooded White Mountains.

‘‘Sometimes it’s suicide and sometimes it’s homicide, but those are rare. Mostly it’s people getting lost, especially in February, when hypothermia can set in really quickly.’’

Sharon Rausch, the mother of Murray’s boyfriend, said the family is hoping for a resolution.

‘‘We all still feel that the odds are that Maura isn’t living, but it’s important for us to bring her home,’’ Rausch said. ‘‘We loved her, and if someone harmed her, they ought to be brought to justice.’’

Joe McGee may be reached at jmcgee@ledger.com.

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Newspaper Articles #168
« Reply #171 on: December 15, 2019, 08:32:14 am »
The New Hampshire Union Leader / Seacoast Online

January 6/7, 2006

"20/20" report on missing N.H. women to air late Jan., early Feb.

'20/20' report on Murray is delayed

By Associated Press

A national television report on the case of a mysterious disappearance in northern New Hampshire won't air until late January or early February, the network said Friday. yesterday.

Reports last month indicated that a "20/20" report on Massachusetts nursing student Maura Murray would air last night. Friday But Alyssa Apple, spokeswoman for the ABC news magazine in New York, said the program is still being worked on.

Murray was 21 when she vanished after a minor car accident the night of Feb. 9, 2004, in Haverhill, N. H. Fred Murray, her father, believes she was the victim of foul play, but police say repeated searches turned up no evidence to support that.

Fred Murray is suing for access to records of the investigation.

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles #169
« Reply #172 on: December 15, 2019, 08:32:42 am »
Fox News - The Lineup

January 13, 2006

Maura Murray Mystery: We’ll tell you about the recently reopened missing person’s case of Maura Murray, a University of Massachusetts-Amherst nursing student who disappeared nearly two years ago in New Hampshire. Her family has been critical of the police investigation and just last week, Fred J. Murray, Maura's father, sued several state offices and law enforcement agencies in New Hampshire seeking the release of police reports and other information and items tied to his daughter's case. Now, a dozen private detectives from four states have teamed up with the Molly Bish Foundation in an attempt to help solve this mystery.

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Newspaper Articles #170
« Reply #173 on: December 15, 2019, 08:33:07 am »
North Country News

January 13, 2006

Private Investigators Work For Free To Find Maura Murray

In early January, members of The NHLI, and other investigators, began working on the Maura Murray case.

In Feb. 2004 college student Maura Murray disappeared while traveling through New Hampshire. Despite extensive efforts by the State and Local Police and Dept. of Fish and Game, she has not been found.

The Board of Directors of The New Hampshire League of Investigators, Inc. voted, unanimously, to take on the task of helping the family. NHLI is the only Professional Association of licensed investigators in the State.

The volunteers come from the NHLI and three surrounding states and are working with the support of the Molly Bish Foundation and other entities, such as S.T.A.L.K, Inc,.

Team members will follow the path set down by their colleagues in Mass. during their recent investigation into the disappearance of Jennifer Fay over 15 years ago. That investigation has led to several recent K-9 searches.

Some of the volunteers have met with members of the family to review the case and have reviewed all of the press coverage associated with the case. The volunteers then held a team meeting in New Hampshire, on Jan. 3, 2006, to further review the case and determine future action.

The team consists of several Investigators from New Hampshire, one from Vermont, two from Massachusetts and one from Maine. Some are retired from law enforcement, some are career private investigators and one is a retired Fire Chief from New Hampshire. All have offered their services pro bono.

The team has gathered all of the media coverage for study as well as topographical maps of the area and are in communication, regularly with the family. They also hope to serve as an interface between the family and law enforcement.

"There are many things that law enforcement does that they can not reveal, even to the family", said NHLI President John Healy, "We will try to help the family understand these things and the whole process, while letting them know this is still being actively investigated by the volunteers as well as law enforcement."

Members of the team will visit the area in early February to begin the familiarization process.

To learn more about the case visit: Mauramurray.com and to learn more about the Association visit: WWW.NHLI.Net.

It is well known that Maura Murray’s family has stated on several occasions that police have not done enough to find the missing woman. Murray was 21 when she disappeared on the evening of February 9, 2004.

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Newspaper Articles #171
« Reply #174 on: December 15, 2019, 08:33:41 am »
North Adams Transcript / Fitchburg Sentinel & Enterprise

January 19, 2006

Note: The North Adams Transcript has additional information in italics.

Also there are some minor wording variations not noted here.

Father seeks records in case of missing girl

By Associated Press

Haverhill, N.H. — A judge Wednesday took under advisement a Massachusetts man’s request to see the police files in the case of his daughter who disappeared in northern New Hampshire.

Grafton County Superior Court Judge Timothy Vaughan heard the case in Haverhill a few miles from where Maura Murray, 21, disappeared after a minor car accident on Route 112 in February 2004, the Valley News reported.

Fred Murray of Hanson, Mass., believes his daughter was a victim of foul play and has is working with private detectives to investigate the case.

Murray claims police, the attorney general and the governor violated state and federal public information laws by not releasing the investigative files and that New Hampshire authorities have failed to conduct a criminal investigation.

The state disputed that claim and said a missing person investigation has the potential of being a criminal case and thus details that could compromise the investigation cannot be made public.

The state has maintained that it has shared any details that would not jeopardize the investigation into the disappearance of the woman, who was a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

After the hearing, Murray said he needs some of those records in his effort to recreate a timeline of what happened.

Murray said members of his family have received interesting information from people and relayed that information to police.

“We’d like to get these records, to see if any of this is being followed up on,” Murray said. “I’m moving every stone I can find, that I can budge. Maybe I can get a break, finally. I can use it.” he said.

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Newspaper Articles #172
« Reply #175 on: December 15, 2019, 08:34:08 am »
WPRI

January 19, 2006

Judge denies father's records request in case of missing daughter

Haverhill, N.H. A New Hampshire judge has denied a request from the father of a missing woman to review confidential police files in the case.

Maura Murray disappeared after a minor car accident in northern New Hampshire in February 2004.

Fred Murray of Hanson believes his daughter was a victim of foul play and sued to gain access to investigatory files. His suit claimed that police, the attorney general and the governor violated state and federal public information laws by not releasing the investigative files.

Judge Timothy Vaughn wrote in his decision yesterday that release of the records could compromise the case and lead to the destruction of evidence.

Maura Murray was a 21-year-old nursing student at U-Mass-Amherst when she went missing. Her father has hired private detectives to investigate the case.

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Newspaper Articles #173
« Reply #176 on: December 15, 2019, 08:34:34 am »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

January 19, 2006

Dad fights for documents in disappearance of daughter

By Lorna Coloquhoun

HAVERHILL -- The pile of documents relating to the disappearance of a Massachusetts woman nearly two years ago contains 2,500 pages, and her father wants to take a look at them.

Fred Murray, whose daughter, Maura, vanished from a rural road in Swiftwater in February 2004, was in Grafton County Superior Court yesterday morning, asking a judge to release those documents, a move he believes will help him in his own search.

"We want to take a fresh look and start over," Murray said after a brief court hearing on his request for release of information pertaining to the case. "This gives me my best hope and my only hope. There might be something in there that means something to me that might be the key."

Murray, through his attorney Timothy Ervin, filed last month for an expedited hearing on a motion for injunctive relief regarding information investigators have gathered in the time since Maura Murray vanished without a trace after a car accident on Route 112.

Judge Timothy Vaughn did not issue a decision yesterday.

Citing Supreme Court cases, Ervin said the fact that the case has always been categorized as a missing person, rather than a criminal matter, is significant.

"The state has never characterized this as an ongoing criminal case," Ervin said, and investigators have never given any reason as to why documents cannot be released. "The overriding concern is that she has been missing for two years and there is still no information about what happened."

Assistant Attorney General Daniel Mullen, who was accompanied by Jeff Strelzin, the head of the state's homicide bureau, said the investigation is ongoing and that it "could have criminal overtones."

Disclosure of information, he said, could "interfere with the ongoing investigation" and release of investigative material would make it "impossible to proceed."

Strelzin said after the hearing that divulging information from an investigative file could alert potential suspects about what is going on, which could cause them to flee or hide evidence.

A team of private investigators is taking up the case of the disappearance, and Fred Murray said there is basic information he needs, such as dispatch logs, that would help create a timeline of what happened between the time his daughter was involved in a minor car accident and the time the first police officer arrived at the scene.

"I'm standing here trying to move every stone I can budge," Murray said before leaving the courthouse yesterday. "Maybe I can get a break. I could sure use it."

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Newspaper Articles #174
« Reply #177 on: December 15, 2019, 08:35:01 am »
Foster’s Daily

Friday, January 27, 2006

N.H. judge denies father's records request in case of missing daughter

By Associated Press

Haverhill, N.H.— A New Hampshire judge denied a Massachusetts man's request to see police files in the case of his daughter who disappeared nearly two years ago.

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Newspaper Articles #175
« Reply #178 on: December 15, 2019, 08:35:36 am »
CNN

Transcript from Nancy Grace Show

January 27, 2006

"Good evening, everybody. I'm Nancy Grace. I want to thank you for being with us tonight. Tonight, the mystery surrounding a 21-year-old nursing student intensifies. Maura Murray drove into a tree, stepped out of the car unharmed. Police there on the scene in just minutes. Maura Murray is gone, never seen again.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Fred Murray wants to look at 2,500 documents, documents containing e-mails Maura sent the day of her disappearance, to information on what police found in her car the night of her accident two years ago, details Murray believes could solve this mystery.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Tell me what did you, tell me what you didn't do, and I`ll try to go back and see what you didn't do and take a fresh look at it and start it all over. It gives us -- it gives me my best hope. It gives me my only hope.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (voice-over): Murray's attorney claims the family has a right to the files under the state right-to-know law.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Her family knows her better than any other party. A second set of eyes looking at information that is clearly nonexempt may ultimately lead to locating her.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: After two years of hoping and praying, a father goes on the offense in the legal system. Two years ago, a beautiful young nursing student went missing after a minor car crash. She ran into a tree. Well, police got there just minutes after the crash and she is gone, never seen since.

Straight out to Gary Lindsley. He is a reporter with "The Caledonian Record."

Gary, are you with me? I know we've got problems with your IFB. Can you hear me?

GARY LINDSLEY, REPORTER, "CALEDONIAN RECORD": Yes, I can, Nancy.

GRACE: Great. Give me the facts, Gary.

LINDSLEY: Well, as it turns out, February 9th, somewhere around 7:00 or 7:30 p.m., Maura was headed on Route 112 in Haverhill, New Hampshire, and she had the minor car accident.

A bus driver came upon the scene, talked to her, asked her if she needed help. She said, no, she'd already called AAA. He went back to the house and called police.

Between the time he went back to the house and called police, a matter of seven to nine minutes, she was gone. No one's ever seen her since.

GRACE: Was there a record of her calling AAA?

LINDSLEY: No, there wasn't. She had not made a call.

GRACE: So she didn't call AAA?

LINDSLEY: Right. That was a very -- it's a very, very rural area. And cell coverage is very hard in some of those areas.

GRACE: Very rural area...

(CROSSTALK)

GRACE: ... so you said "isolated route." How many people? I mean, this is not a very busy road. How many people would have been going along that road to snatch her?

LINDSLEY: Not too many, because once you get up past the crash scene, there are seasonal residences between the crash scene and Woodstock, New Hampshire.

GRACE: To Diane Dimond, investigative reporter, what else can you tell us to supplement Gary's report?

DIMOND: Well, it was two years ago, right before Valentine's Day actually -- and this young woman, who was a nursing student, she'd also been a cadet at West Point, a girl with her head on straight, you would think -- e-mailed her professors and said, "I'm going to be gone for a week because there`s been a death in the family."

Well, there had been no death in her family. She left the University at Amherst in Massachusetts. And instead of going home, she headed north up to Vermont and New Hampshire. And that`s where this accident occurred.

It struck me, Nancy, and everything that I've researched about this case, she has this accident. Within 10 minutes, the police are there. She's gone. And there's snow all around her car, but there`s no footsteps. It's like a "Twilight Zone" alien abduction thing. I mean, where did she go?

She had diamond jewelry in the car that her boyfriend had given her, a bottle of liquor, some clothes, a book, you know, just the normal things, like she was just going to go home. But she went the opposite way.

To me, it's just heart-wrenching to see that father asking for these documents from the court. I want to look at the police report, he said, so my private detectives can take over. And they won`t let him do it. A judge has now said, no, we will not turn those documents over to you. It could compromise the investigation.

GRACE: To Barbara McDougal and Patti Davidson -- they are joining us tonight. They are cousins of Maura Murray. Ladies, thank you for being with us.

Barbara, what did -- yes, thanks, Liz -- Barbara, what did you guys hope to gain from these documents you were in court fighting for?

BARBARA MCDOUGAL, MAURA MURRAY`S COUSIN: Well, we were hoping that there might be information in them that the police would overlook as meaning nothing but the family it may mean something to us, to have a different avenue to go down in searching for Maura.

GRACE: Right. Yes, it's been two long years.

To Patti, Patti, what do you believe law enforcement has missed in this investigation? Obviously something.

PATTI DAVIDSON, MAURA MURRAY`S COUSIN: I believe they waited too long to get a search team together. They waited 39 hours, and it should have been done immediately after they went to the scene and found her not there.

GRACE: Now, I know that you have joined together with the Molly Bish Foundation. We had Molly's parents on for a full hour around Christmas. Their daughter taken and killed.

Joining us now, Tom Shamshack, P.I. on the Murray search. He's also working with the Molly Bish Foundation. What`s your take on this, Tom?

TOM SHAMSHACK, PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR IN MAURA'S CASE: Good evening, Nancy. John and Maggie send their love.

GRACE: Thank you. Thank you.

SHAMSHACK: All right. The investigative team, consisting of a dozen retired law enforcement investigators, is doing three things. We're looking to do investigative research on what has been written in the public domain. We're conducting interviews of percipient witnesses. And we're conducting a scene investigation, looking at the crash dynamics, and then again looking in the area, what possibly could have happened here.

GRACE: Renee, what else do you know about it?

ROCKWELL: To me, Nancy?

GRACE: Yes.

ROCKWELL: From what I can say, Nancy, is here is another situation where a family has had to hire a private detective. Why? Resources. In 2004, there were over 46,000 people missing in the U.S., 99 in New Hampshire. It's just a situation where I don`t know why the police department would have hid that or prevented them from getting those documents.

GRACE: Well, let`s look at the facts. No footsteps in the snow to indicate where she had gone. The police got there 10 minutes later, no sign of her. She had said there was a death in the family, told her professor she was leaving, no death in the family, and she went a different way. This was a minor crash; she went right into a tree.

Tonight, 603-271-2663, help us find Maura Murray. The reward up to $40,000 tonight."

MauraMurrayEvidence

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Newspaper Articles #176
« Reply #179 on: December 15, 2019, 08:36:05 am »
The New Hampshire Union Leader

January 27, 2006

Dad denied access to records on daughter

By Lorna Coloquhoun

Haverhill -- A superior court judge has denied a request by the father of a missing Massachusetts woman seeking the disclosure of records pertaining to the investigation into her disappearance.

Grafton County Judge Timothy Vaughn issued a five-page decision yesterday, a little more than a week after Frederick Murray sought an injunction for the release of papers relating to the disappearance nearly two years ago of his daughter, Maura.

Murray's attorney, Timothy Ervin of Chelmsford, Mass., said yesterday he would not comment on the decision until he conferred with his client.

Maura Murray, 21, a nursing student at the University of Massachusetts/Amherst, disappeared after a minor car accident Feb. 9, 2004, on rural Route 112 in Swiftwater. By the time police arrived at the scene, the woman was gone and has not been seen or heard from since that night.

In the nearly two years since his daughter went missing, Frederick Murray has sought, and been denied, various logs, accident reports and other information from a number of state agencies, including State Police and the Attorney General's Office.

Last month, he filed for an expedited hearing on his request for an injunction that would order the agencies to disclose the information and that hearing was held Jan. 18. Ervin argued that the information is not exempt from New Hampshire's right-to-know law. The state argued that releasing the information would impede the ongoing investigation.

Vaughn sided with the state.

"(The state) maintain(s) that release of the records could result in the destruction of evidence, chilling and intimidation of witnesses and the revelation of the scope and nature of the investigation," Vaughn wrote.

Murray has been critical of how the investigation into his daughter's disappearance has been conducted. He contends that the information gathered over the past two years could help his own efforts in finding his daughter. A group of private investigators is looking into the case.

"Considering that it sometimes takes several years -- even decades -- for the state to prosecute major crimes, a lapse of two years is not a long period of time," Vaughn wrote. "Release of the records could jeopardize the investigation and lead to, among other things, destruction of evidence, intimidation of witnesses and loss of communications with entities providing confidential information."

Preserving the integrity of the continuing investigation, Vaughn concluded, outweighs Murray's interest in obtaining records.

 

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